"En brus"

Translation:A soda

May 25, 2015

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonesInPublic

For all the Germans: Think of "Brause" to remember it ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/soupandbread

Here, in Ireland, if someone asked me "do you want a soda?" I'd be expecting some fried bread with bacon and eggs!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaysm

Even with pop or coke, this is very much a translation to American rather than English, a dialect answer rather than generic


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarahT14

American English is English. It's at least as standard as British English. (You can argue this point linguistically if you like, but it is clearly Duolingo's practice to accept American English as a least a standard, if not the only standard.)

Pop/soda is probably the single most famous regional variation in American English--it's something every secondary-school student is aware of. If the goal is to teach people to actually communicate with other people, this is at least one variation that does need to be included!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaysm

But they are far from globally useful. In several countries Soda will get you soda/tonic water and Pop is meaningless. At very least the list should accept/inform of all common options.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RuanHarding

I'm from South Africa and was wondering about "cold drinks"? This is what we would call anything drinkable other then water or alcohol. Coke, pepsi, Fanta, Cream Soda, even mixes like 7up or Oros? Does this count as any one of those or simply that of said "fizzy drinks"(anything containing carbon gas like Coca Cola)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

'Brus' only covers what you would call fizzy drinks; carbonated beverages without alcohol.

The reason 'cold drinks' is accepted here is because it has a narrower meaning in some parts of the US.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RuanHarding

Thanks! I understand completely! Norwegian is very similar to Afrikaans so most of it is quite easy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pirustae69

Plainly speaking: You're awesome.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OhBogy

this is refering to soda as breverage, but can this also be refered to as baking soda?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

No, baking soda is called 'natron' in Norwegian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarahT14

Do you accept "pop", also?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luke_5.1991

Yes! I would betray my fellow Minnesotans if we didn't.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WinAR6

They call it pop in only the northern states. I live in North Dakota and when people come from the south, it sounds weird when they say soda or soda pop.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarahT14

It's not quite as simple as that. It isn't just north-south. Some northern states say "soda". And in some southern states, it's all "Coke" (even if it's Pepsi).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WinAR6

Well I'm sorry preteens can't live in every state at once...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarahT14

No problem, you were correct that "pop" is mainly in use in the north (good observation). I was just adding more information because I think it's interesting and useful for language learners. (I've probably lived in more states than most.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Naylor1993

Surely "pop" on its own should be accepted. I've never heard anyone say "a pop".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cobitome

"Would you gimme a pop?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Naylor1993

You would say that to mean a fizzy drink? In the UK it would be 'some pop' rather than 'a pop'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cobitome

What if it was an unopened can?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Naylor1993

That would be a can of pop.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gary_Kotka

So.... 'King of pop' sounds reeeeally funny to some americans? And listening to pop would look really funny holding a glass of carbonated beverage to your ear? </troll> I know, words have different meanings in different parts of a country, state or even a city, but since nobody brought up this aspect, I did. =)

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