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"Non danno caramelle ai cavalli."

Translation:They do not give candies to the horses.

September 27, 2013

77 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wrathful_Midget

Lol :P. I gave my old horses sugar cubes. They love 'em.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mistaF

why can't it be "I [or they] don't give candy to horses [in general]". Io bevo l'acqua can mean I drink water, you don't have to say I drink the water.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nitram.

Perhaps you could use "si" pronoun here, though I'm not sure. Perhaps this one is correct:

Non si dà caramelle ai cavalli. - One does not give candies to horses.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dr.Moir1

That would have been better. I wrote (as an imperative) "Do not give candies to the horses" and it was marked incorrect. But the sentiment is still they. THEY are not supposed to do THIS.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2525

There is no "supposed to" in the sentence. It's simply a report on their actions: They do not give candies to the horses. Non danno caramelle ai cavalli.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JennaHO

I'm confused. I put "I do not" instead of "They do not" and was marked wrong. In the conjugation list "danno" is used for "io." Am I missing something or did they mess up?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Strickster

In the conjugation list for this verb in the present, the conjugation for "io" is "dò", I just checked. So either it was a error, and they fixed it, or you made some kind of mistake when checking.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JennaHO

This was a long time ago, but thank you! It was an error that I reported.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Strickster

Oh, ok, sorry. That's what happens when comments don't have a time stamp, I guess. Still, glad it's fixed


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rakalaw18

Can someone explain "ai" to me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shjasani

Both 'al' and 'ai' are used to say to the. 'Al' is used when the subject is singular - Non dai caramella al cavallo. 'Ai' is used when the subject is plural - Non dai caramella ai cavalli. I think this is correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Franco_Incitti

"Ai" is the combination of "a" and "i" or "to" and "the".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GiovannaContu

I answered "They don't give the horses sweets" why is this wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaraLoureiro

Hi there. I think it's because of the order in which the words appear, not because it's American English. The sencente is 'Non danno caramelle ai cavalli', so you should end your sentence with horses. At least, this is what I've noticed during other lessons.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/o-HELENA-o

Yeah, i know. I answered something like that. Annoying! U got it right, just not PERFECTLY.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sw7Ky

It isn't. Duo's English is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DancingDraft

I think because Duolingo uses American English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VahidR

Can't wait for a situation to use this one in real life.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sara718404

Why is it wrong to include 'le' before caramelle? 'Non danno le caramelle ai cavailli'. Am I wrong in thinking it's usual to always include the definite article?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paupel

I read the conjugation and I saw: io DÒ, tu dai, lui/lei DA Whereas WordReference says: io DO, tu dai, lui/lei DÀ Why this difference in accents? Can someone explain it to me? Thx!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davoskan

How do you say: "You all don't give candy to the girls". My attempt: "Non date caramelle a le regazze". "Ale" or "a le" ? Grazie.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amanthi

Very helpful. Thank you :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jack3361

caramelle is plural?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RafaelVescia

Yep.. LA caramellA (singular) // LE caramellE (plural).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/o-HELENA-o

I said "they do not give the candies to horses" when the answer was "they do not give candies to the horses". And I got it wrong. Of course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmmaLouiseC

Is the definate article really required here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmmaLouiseC

NVM, must be because I used "sweets" instead of "candies" - although I'm sure in other questions the Standard (English-)English form was accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gardenhoser

Why does the "r" in "caramelle" sound like an "r" in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Briguy84

Man I got this one wrong because I thought I heard hai instead of ai.......there has to be a way to differentiate between them!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/awebb253

I slowed down the audio, and she very distinctly says "hai"! It didn't make sense to me, but, she DEFINITELY says "hai"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eltapatio

Formica ayudanos!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/safibta

"Sweets are not given to the horses" - Is this a correct translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2525

No. You're transforming an active sentence into a passive one. That's an entirely different grammatical construction and completely bypasses who is doing the giving.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hello72207

both of you have a long streak


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuisRolando3

Why would somebody do that for gods sake


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BedirhanYilmazz

How would one say "Don't give candies to the horses." if not this way?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2525

For the infinitive DARE, "TO GIVE", the present indicative is:

io do = I give
tu dai = you give (s)
lui/lei da = he/she gives
noi diamo = we give
voi date = you give (pl)
loro danno = they give

For your sentence you need the imperative mood. In this case, since dare is a little irregular, it would be non da' for "tu" and non date for "voi".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ha.di

How can i say "Do not give candies to the horses!" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2525

For tu, that would be "Non dai..."
For voi, that would be "Non date..."

http://www.italian-verbs.com/italian-verbs/conjugation.php?parola=dare
Imperative is at the bottom.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sclare92

Which part suggests it's "they"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2525

The verb conjugation.

DARE (TO GIVE)
io do = I give
tu dai = you give (s)
lui/lei da = he/she gives
noi diamo = we give
voi date = you give (pl)
loro danno = they give


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anne609994

Methinks I also need a text book to sort these conjugations out.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2525

You can use Google Translate to learn the infinitive and then get the conjugation chart from https://www.italian-verbs.com/

Dare is slightly irregular because of what happens with the stem*, but most verbs in Italian are regular and slot into the following templates:

https://i.imgur.com/8atYu1Y.png

* (two other examples of irregular verbs include bere, which is another slightly irregular verb due to what happens with the stem, and andare, which is very irregular due to something called suppletion**)

** (suppletion means it uses different words from different sources; the irregular English verb "to be" is the result of suppletion)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OscarVazqu678746

In the US, it is also said candy in general, and it's just as good as candies. In fact "candies" sounds weird.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2525

"Candy" is one of those nouns that can be both countable (discrete) and non-countable (mass).

"Candy" as a category or concept is non-countable:
He eats too much candy.
Look at all that candy!

"Candy" as specific instantiations or sub-types is countable:
There are too many candies to name.
What are all these candies?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Golly410699

Duo should accept sweets instead of candies for English speakers


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jennyward2

Sweets are the UK translation for caramelle


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SergioRega1

Do not and don't are the same. Duolingo keeps having the same issues about not knowing what is correct and what is not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2525

Duolingo is a computer program that can get a bit buggy when it comes to contractions and the apostrophe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Naseem200170

Does Duolingo provide conjugation lists?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2525

It used to.

There are other places online that conjugate verbs, but you need to know the infinitive. That can be discovered with a bit of Googling, though: translate "to give" into italian for example gives you dare.

From there you can go to places like https://www.italian-verbs.com/ and enter "dare", which gives you this: https://www.italian-verbs.com/italian-verbs/conjugation.php?parola=dare

Most (although not all) verbs are regular, and regular verbs follow a template for conjugation depending on whether their stem ends in -are, -ere, or -ire. There are two different ways to conjugate regular -ire verbs, though, and apparently you just need to memorize which verbs take the special conjugation.


https://i.imgur.com/pDIGQXp.jpg


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RowanWH

Couldn't you please be less USA centric? We don't ask say "candies" in English!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thanatos767

We don't say candies in the USA. Candy is both plural and singular to us.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrucePlumb

Can you explain the alternative form “dànno” some more? Is it the original historical form and is now considered out of date? context.reverso.net doesn’t show any search results for dànno, but verbi-italiani.info gives dànno as the only form. If it is not out of date then DL should accept it without the complaint: “pay attention to the accents”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/glamdring1984

Could 'sweets' please be accepted as well as 'candies'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stewart634775

When do you use 'ai' and 'al', don't they both mean 'to the'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2525

Italian has different words for "the" depending on whether the word is masculine or feminine, singular or plural, and what sound the next word begins with.


https://i.imgur.com/aJ7Qlgb.jpg


https://i.imgur.com/1Uh64MZ.png


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CMSHCJ

Candies is American English, sweets should be accepted as British English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nello.Papi

Why is it translated as "they" do not give? I sai d it was Don,t give ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2525

In English, "Don't give" is the imperative mood, and imperative is almost exclusively 2nd person.

In Italian, because of how the verbs conjugate uniquely, it's very common to omit the subject pronoun without changing the meaning of the sentence.

For the infinitive DARE (TO GIVE) the present indicative is:

io do = I give
tu dai = you give (s)
lui/lei da = he/she gives
noi diamo = we give
voi date = you give (pl)
loro danno = they give

As you can see, "danno" can only mean "they give".

In this case, since dare is a little irregular, the imperative would be non da' for "tu" and non date for "voi".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarlaCulve

if "danno" is they, what is I?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2525

"Loro" is "they", "I" is "io". "Danno" is the conjugation used for the "loro" pronoun.

DARE
io do
tu dai
lui da
noi diamo
voi date
loro danno


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amy297740

Danno also means to damage. so I thought it said they do not damage the horse's candy. It's crazy how in Italian so many words can me and other words as well. Do, dai, da, etc, do not mean damage, so I was easily able to figure it out but it would take me a long time if someone said that to me to figure out they were talking about giving.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2525

English has its fair share of homonyms, as do many other languages.

Also, "danno" meaning "damage" is a noun, not a verb. The verb "to damage" is "danneggiare".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sanan22

I'm trying understand the placement of "non" in the sentence. so how would you negate anything other than the verb in the sentence of this example?

what I mean is for example "not they give candies to the horses" or "they give non-candies to horses" or "they give candies to non-horses"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2525

"non" always comes immediately before the verb.

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