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"La práctica hace al maestro."

Translation:Practice makes perfect.

5 years ago

136 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/bf2010
bf2010
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Duolingo chooses a literal translation, which of course is correct; the English language has a different proverb for this situation "Practice makes perfect"; Duolingo should accept this as correct too.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andrewduo
andrewduo
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Accepted now.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Not only that, it shows above as the English translation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElleLingo

You need to report these issues rather than post here as per the warning in red before you start typing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

Sometimes I feel that my response should have been accepted but I'm not confident about it due to my relatively low level of expertise. So instead of wasting the admin's time with reports from someone who doesn't know what she's talking about, I mention it here to see who does/doesn't agree with me. There will always be another opportunity to report it if it turns out to be necessary.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MJMGruver
MJMGruver
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I agree. I often look at the discussions to see if others had the same thoughts before I report something.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElleLingo

Yes but Duo clearly prefers to get the reports as per the red warning before posting. Duo has decided for itself that it doesn't want the discussion board being clogged up with these yet some people take it upon themselves to override that decision for them which is inappropriate in my opinion.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

@Squeeze... huh? You consider us other relatively low of expertise students like yourself worthy advisors? Hah! We are all in the same boat. One, barely afloat.

When you file a report that is off base the Duolingo peeps will ignore it. So.... "no problemo." -Terminator (pseudo Spanish)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

Quite often there are either multiple people that agree with one another and/or can provide links to support their answers, or native speakers than can confirm whether I am right or not. These are the sorts of answers I look for (and often research as well after I have found them to further form a more complete picture of the truth.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

True. Provided links can be good. The best help comes from Spanish speaking natives of the Americas.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SergeyVinogradov

Not "no problemo", but "sin problema"/"no hay problema". UPDATED from problemo to problema.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iakobski

Sergey, if you're going to correct someone, you should make sure you are correct. The Spanish for the American slang "no problemo" is actually "No hay problema" or sometimes "Ningún problema".

Note that problema ends in an "a" but is masculine.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

"No problemo" is psuedo Spanish and is a joke. Not of my creation however. It's movie thing.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Disco2000_T

@sergey what is wrong with them?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Disco2000_T

@Sergey I'm not sure what your issue with the English and Cyrillic 'transcriptions' is. They're just showing readers how to pronounce the Spanish words. It also seems to be a Russian page, so it's not especially surprising that they've written out the words phonetically in Cyrillic.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SergeyVinogradov

@disko, my issue with those "transcriptions", is that they are wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SergeyVinogradov

@iakobski, thanks for pointing to "o"/"a" ending, I always mix them. But I wanted to emphasize on "sin" vs "no" (or at least "no hay" vs "no"). I'm living in Spain now, and have access to native speakers, they prefer "sin" version. Google translate, spanishdict and other dictionaries for some reason don't show "sin" version, but I wouldn't trust them a lot (look at this one for example - http://tinyurl.com/jqqextr, what are "no eye day kay" and especially "но аи дэй каи" English and Russian "transcription" doing there?)

@Eugene, what's the point of showing example of wrong Spanish in a Spanish-learning forum? People tend to remember, and later misuse such phrases.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SergeyVinogradov

@disco. I'm sorry, are you trolling me?

If you're not, i'll give an answer, but it could have been googled by yourself before asking:

English "transcription", "no eye day kay" - is totally wrong (confirmed with http://www.pronouncenames.com/pronounce/kay and with my colleague from the USA): according to them, American version of this "transcription" will sound like [noʊ aɪ deɪ keɪ], while British like [nəʊ aɪ deɪ keɪ]. Not only it differs from proper transcription of Spanish "no hay de qué" - [no aɪ de ke], but also Brit. and Am. versions differ among themselves, which breaks all the point of writing "transcriptions" in English-friendly way. There's a standard for that - IPA - why inventing something strange.

Russian "transcription", "но аи дэй каи" - looks just like a transliteration from Latin to Cyrillic chars of the previously discussed "English transcription", and doesn't remind "но ай дэ кэ", which will sound like Spanish "no hay de qué".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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Somehow not reporting issues here doesn't seem to improve my Spanish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElleLingo

It won't because they're not related and I don't think anyone was discussing that.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shawnruby
shawnruby
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shut up

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElleLingo

Are you going to send Duo a message telling them to 'shut up' as well? It's their rule, not mine. I just repeated it. You may not use these discussions a lot so a word of advice: people usually keep things civil. This isn't YouTube.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamesw0906

I totally agree. This should be a place where we all try to help one another in gaining knowledge in a respectful way.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dingo8baby

I agree with you, but I dont feel that her original comment was respectful either.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shawnruby
shawnruby
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God shut up

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Furbolg

Why so salty?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rockyc138

I would be worried about telling God to shut up. He is someone you really don't want to mess with

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maxinedev

that's the only translation I see here!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Same here. My guess is that the English must have been changed from whatever it was before.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

I do not understand why you prefer that page since it just pertains to the use of "al."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Terry716536

Yeah but this isn't english it is spanish

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hjh788272

Accepted 24/6/18

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crrrivers

That's the English idiom, but the Spanish version makes more sense. Practice does not make perfect, but it can make one into a teacher.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
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The literal translation is, "Practice makes the master." That seems pretty close in meaning to "Practice makes perfect."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rilianxi
rilianxi
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The literal translation is "the practice does (to) the master".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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I don't thing the English expression is less meaningful than the Spanish one, I could say, when you practice, you don't always become a teacher, and I think "maestro" is not here with the meaning of teacher, but to master something.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roentgen89
Roentgen89
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Indeed; I put "practice makes the teacher" & got marked as incorrect. I have not reported it as I think the idea is to learn the idiomatic expression here.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Atrox9
Atrox9
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And in an earlier lesson, when I translated maestro as master rather than teacher, it was marked wrong.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PedroDuo87
PedroDuo87
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In dutch we say: "Oefening baart kunst."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AustinBlues

That is how I translated it. Now (Sept 14, 2015) that is marked as incorrect

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jack.george

I agree but I used teacher and it is not accepted. Your thinking makes good sense to me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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That's normal, never try to translate word by word an idiomatic expression, it's almost always wrong. When you have this kind of expression, try to find another expression in the language in which you want to translate it, that means the same thing. Practice makes the teacher has no sense in English. The meaning is when you pratice something, you can master this. And there's nothing to do with the teacher or teaching something, even in the Spanish expression.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGarrick62

Given the number of nonsensical statements we encounter on Duo, being able to recognize idiomatic expressions we've not previously seen in a language we don't know is a fairly low probability venture. In this case I had the idiom handed to me in the hover hint. I doubt I'd have guessed it without that.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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Yeah, they should at least warn it's idiomatic. but maybe they count on the forum to do this. We should make the suggestion among the improvement suggestions, but their suggestion management is very poor, even if I persuaded they do their best to improve the site, they're just poorly organized.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Principito_Rojo

You've missed the entire point of the English version of this idiom.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGarrick62

I understand the idiom, but can anyone explain the function of "al" in the Spanish? This would seem to literally translate to "the practice makes to the master." Why do I need "a" following "hace?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maxinedev

When the action of the verb is affecting a person or people (plural), there is always an "a" in front of the subject affected by the action. For example: I visit my father "Yo visito a mi padre", I visit my house "Yo visito mi casa (no "a", because house is not a person). Another example: I saw my family "Yo vi a mi familia" (family is comprised of human beings). I learned that early in the game, and practice turned me into a teacher.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusanHill0

Thanks! your post was helpful! (Now help me remember it!!)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MJMGruver
MJMGruver
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The personal 'a' is used before a direct object that is a person. (Occasionally before animals.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/matthewfbyrnes

I have the same question. That "a" keeps sneaking in places I don't expect it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/demsw

As I understand it, the "a" precedes an object when when the object is animate i.e. a human being (I believe it can also be used with animals too). I am pretty sure this is true, but as soy gringa, you might want to check with a native.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iakobski

With animals, it's only pets. Never use the personal a with an animal that you're going to eat!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/james.ray1
james.ray1
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Yes, because you wouldn't want to think of eating an object that was once animate! (I am a vegetarian).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdhicks1
cdhicks1
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I'll go with that

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

The "a" goes before nouns.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

This is my least favorite sentence.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daveduck
Daveduck
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Finally! A genuine idiom.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PoetryOtter

Can't maestro also mean teacher?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hlok
Hlok
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Yes, often a master of a topic becomes a teacher. You may even call a master, mentor, or boss a teacher. Maestro, Sensei, Mentor, Teacher are all similar terms.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stigg426

Does this translate literally to: "practice makes a teacher/master (of someone)?"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bf2010
bf2010
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Yes, it does "practice makes the master" is the literal translation; and as you can see by the translation given today (June 2013) "Practice makes perfect" is accepted by Duolingo now....

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sallyann_54

Fantastic!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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No, it's not "teacher" it's someone who can master something.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/reddle
reddle
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I can never tell whether the literal or the traditional translation is wanted.

I guess it's true either way.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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The literal translation is never wanted, you can't translate a language word by word, it's always wrong or clumbsy, but you can't get too far from the meaning.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
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Actually, the opposite is true. The literal translation is preferred because it's the closest in meaning (it avoids the chance of interpretation and changing the meaning with personal biases). And it helps you to learn the language quicker by immersing yourself in the words actually being said, helping you to think in the new language. Translation is not the best way to learn a new language, by the way. If you are going to use translation, it's better to do literal translations for the reasons stated.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sharon_Kay

That's the way to teach an idiom!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/homefire

I think an even better translation would be to the English proverb Experience makes the (best) teacher.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jimcook546

"The practice makes the teacher." - Sounds good to me! A little Zen maybe; but it has the same meaning as "Practice Makes Perfect" - Always Remember The Practice! It was counted wrong by DuoLingo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeremy391420

"?La practica? ? Hablamos sobre la practica?" Sr. Iverson.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TerryHMay

Well Duo.... Practise is not a typo as you implied. In many parts of the English speaking world (except the USA) practice is the noun, practise is the verb. I practise my English is a correct example. Dr. Smith runs a medical practice is a correct example. Thus, in the Duo wotld, where languages are learned, "practise (action verb) is important" makes more sense in many English speaking countries and should not be corrected as a typo. Unless you really meant "practice" only, but then the sentence would require more context to make that clear.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Disco2000_T

You're right about the different endings for verb and noun, but 'practice' in 'practice makes perfect' is a noun not a verb. Eg 'I practise (verb) my spanish, 'I am going to do some practice (noun)'. It works the same as advise / advice. 'I advise(verb) her', 'Advice(noun) helps her improve'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/inckwise

So does "maestro" actually mean teacher AND perfect? Or in Spanish do they say and mean practice makes "the master or teacher" and in English we have the idiom? Is that why I got "...hace perfecto" marked wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/haidarahhusain
haidarahhusain
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No, maestro doesn't mean perfect. Here perfect is not the literal translation of maestro. The idiom in Spanish use maestro, the equal idiom in English use perfect.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tuchelu

Error here. Its an awkward sentance anyway so i put, practice makes the teacher. Which is actually what is says.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AgnyLeo
AgnyLeo
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I do not understand why people have to dislike the comments just because they disagree or something. It could not be any more obvious that all of us have different opinions. And some more respect would be great. :)) (no hate pls)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

What comment are you referring to that was disliked ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AgnyLeo
AgnyLeo
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A lot of comments on duolingo are being disliked, i understand the ones which are with hatred towards someone and similarly. But some, in my opinion are dislike unnecessarily. For example, in this comment section : jack.george 's comment (in the beginning) : "I agree but I used teacher and it is not accepted. Your thinking makes good sense to me." As if making mistakes and sharing your own experience is a bad thing. But it has 3 dislikes. 3 isn't a lot, of course, I've seen a lot more than this but I would need to search to provide more examples. But my question would be why dislike it ? Like, what did he do?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

I can't figure out why his comment was disliked three times. It looked fine to me. The only time I dislike a comment is if it is crude, rude, or profane, or if it is ridiculous and unrelated to the Spanish lesson.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AgnyLeo
AgnyLeo
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I'm glad you got my point. The comment can be ridiculous to me, as long as there's no hate, rudeness and all.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/snoblitt

"Practice makes the teacher.", should also be correct

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

This is an idiomatic expression, which I don't think should be used in a course for beginning students, because it is confusing.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
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Why the personal "a" here? It seems "master" here is not an actual existing person but a hypothetical possibility if you were to practice enough. Why personalized a non-existing person?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daveduck
Daveduck
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I don't think that it's the personal "a" here as much as it is a clarifying preposition to indicate which is the subject and which is the object of the statement.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maxinedev

Is this section the "idioms" section?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tjajab
tjajab
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How would you translate the (admittedly strange) sentence "The practice makes the teacher"? Would that be "el maestro" instead of "al maestro"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mark2020
Mark2020
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Your sentence is the literal translation of the Spanish one. The Spanish sentence just needs an extra 'a'. See the other discussions for this sentence.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tjajab
tjajab
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The reason I asked is because I answered exactly that and Duolingo said it was incorrect, telling me that the correct sentence was ("The practice makes the master" or "practice makes perfect"). Even though it is not an idiomatic translation, I thought it would be marked as correct if it (literally) is.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kooptroop

Not Exactly sure, but how is this so? lol i never would have guessed without looking

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/atdabomb

The translation "Practice makes perfect" should be the suggested answer, but how can Duolingo except no alternatives??

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Terry716536

Boy did they really mess this onw up. "The practice makes the teacher." Not, " practice makes perfect."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AyanaARI

No, they did that on purpose. With idioms, Duolingo gives us the equivalent idiom, instead of the exact translation. If you want both, there're plenty places on the internet where you can find hundreds of Spanish sayings and expressions with the English equivalent and the exact translation in English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AyanaARI

Uh oh Duolingo... Your proverbs skill is leaking...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

Indeed. I feel that a lot of the arguments people are having about which translations should or shouldn't be accepted for this sentence would be abated if it was in the idioms lesson.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/george455805

The practice makes the teacher

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EstherBaumann123

I would say practice makes a master ( in England a Master is also a teacher)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Esquilax88
Esquilax88
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does this say the practice makes the teacher? and will these sorts of things pop up every now and then and you have to do your best to know proverbs?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElleLingo

I don't think people should worry about idioms as they're rarely used in day-to-day speech. I think in the beginning and for the most part, people should just focus on memorising the most common words and sentences they will need for general discussion and specific events like interviews, parties etc. and after that, start to focus on 'expressions' that make you sound more native. For example, learn "I know grammar really well" first but then later, start learning things like "I know grammar like the back of my hand" and "I know grammar inside (and) out" because this is how natives actually speak. Being able to speak properly and then being able to use expressions is much more important in my opinion than knowing a few idioms you will occasionally use. I can't remember the last time I used an idiom.

(I realise there is overlap between the meaning of 'idiom' and 'expression' so I'm using 'expression' here to mean 'the set ways English speakers have of expressing something in everyday speech'. I use 'idiom' here to mean 'a phrase that is very specific and unique in how and when it's used'.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

The literal translation is practice makes the teacher. I never would have guessed it meant 'practice makes perfect'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iakobski

Maestro also means master, for example maestro carpintero (master carpenter), maestro de ajedrez (chess master). So if you start at "practice makes the master" it's an easy jump to "practice makes perfect".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/griffindance
griffindance
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This is not an Idioms exercise.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

Since when does maestro mean perfect. If this is an idiomatic phrase, it shouldn't be thrown into a regular lesson.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lilush0_0
lilush0_0
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Me gusta esta versión: 'la práctica hace al maestro' mucho mejor de en inglés! Porque nada 'haces a nosotros perfectas pero podemos hacer maestras Y maestros de lo que quieras si trabajas mucho! (Hope I wrote this right, please correct me if not)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AgnyLeo
AgnyLeo
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Well, not everyone was born and willing to become a teacher. Therefore, I prefer the sentence with the word perfect because in my opinion, it can be applied to anyone :))

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cogbon
cogbon
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Yeah, should probably place this one in the "Idioms" section also...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nicole942077

From the discussion below, "Practice makes perfect" doesn't seem like it is the literal translation. What is the literal translation? Practice makes the master?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/meilonn
meilonn
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There it is! I've been waiting for this moment the entire course!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jaydak

And all of a sudden, this lesson has turned into idioms practice.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/souadelkad

O.k.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ronkisimo
ronkisimo
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is this the personal a in use here?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

Yes.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alicia2017

Practice makes the teacher . --- was NOT accepted

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bdrake1089

In this sentence, is "teacher" not equal to maestro? Because I got it wrong for putting teacher

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.-J.

The other dictionary definition of 'maestro' is 'master'. The correct literal translation is 'Practice makes the master'. Duolingo is using a very loose translation, which I would not have used.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alicia2017

So what happened to TEACHER ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Verlane.
Verlane.
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Now i know i can't trust the audio. The woman says "la practica HACIA el maestro" dont sounds like "hace"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HACKIE1

EL WRONGO, LA PRACTICA NO HACE PERFECTO, LA PRACTICA SE HACE PERMANENTE.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OMichaelMageo

This seems idiomatic, i wonder why it is not in the idioms section!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alethea436961

So if Perfect is accepted, why is NOT teacher accepted? Seems like a good case statement is needed here..

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lani_Mo
Lani_Mo
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If you'd asked me , I would have said this means "The practice/practical was done to/on the teacher" hahaha...thank God this was one of the exercises where Duo wants you to make a sentence out of given words.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SCOTTVELEZ

Shouldn't this be in Idioms, not vocab?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FelizBee

Duolingo also accepts literal translation, Master for maestro, but not the word teacher. Also, i see no warning in red on my screen about reporting these issues rather than posting here. :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

There is no "warning in red" that prompts you to report anything. When you complete an exercise, it tells you if you were right or wrong. In that box are two icons: a speech bubble (the one you used to get here, to the comments page) and a flag. The flag is the icon you use to report issues. Talking or complaining about problems in the comment section will not cause those problems to go away. You must used the flag icon to report them.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/garyspector1

maestro is not the word perfect !

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gower9
gower9
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We have the exact idiom in Polish! "Praktyka czyni mistrza" which literally means "Practice makes the master".

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lo-Chi

A veces la práctica me vuelve loco.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2_Learn_Spanish

Cool! I didn't have to buy the idioms skill to learn a few idioms!

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

Way to have a positive attitude about it, rather than complaining about which lesson this phrase "should" be included in. Have a lingot!

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gorg346283

I tried "Practice makes expert." Which duolingo rejected but while not "Practice makes perfect" it carries much of the flavor of the old quote while keeping more of the sense of the Spanish phrase I think.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bergurgeir

No one is perfect so why practice?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JulianRamirez502

hjnoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooomyurdnw3sgrsvwsebuydfy

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vel449458

Humm.... "La práctica hace la perfección." Please correct.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/felsan82

This sentence should be in set phrases.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/milrecan
milrecan
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Seriously!!!!!

4 years ago