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"Yo tampoco."

Translation:Me neither.

5 years ago

137 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/CastorTroy

Only "Me neither" is accepted, isn't "Me either" also possible?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stigg426

Yes, but one is more correct than the other.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kay337064

But usually when one is more correct than the other, they accept either.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iago
Iago
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"Me either" is kind of slangy, it's not proper English.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArtDK
ArtDK
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"Proper" probably wouldn't include "me neither" or "me either", because the subject should be "I." In terms of what is regularly used, I agree "me neither" is probably more common, but wouldn't be considered correct in, say, formal writing. EDIT: My English friend would say and write "Neither do I."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Howard
Howard
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There is no verb. The disjunctive pronoun, "me," is required.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZitaBriar

Good point; also, I think, since there is no verb used, a more specific English translation would be "nor I".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Or "Neither am I." :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roman2095
roman2095
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However, if the first person is the object of the verb then "me" would be the correct pronoun to use. e.g. Person 1: That doesn't affect me. Person 2: Me neither! ("Neither does it affect me" would perhaps be more eloquent but rarely said).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crisjordan22

good point!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Howard
Howard
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"Nor I" is certainly not more specific, perhaps a little more formal.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MatousAc
MatousAc
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What about "Nor I"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jyjoo
jyjoo
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well, i did some googling, and it seems highly debatable. for instance, http://painintheenglish.com/case/109/ and http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/ask-teacher/34165-me-neither-me-either.html

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jocelyn-H
Jocelyn-H
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Really? That's what I thought, too. My friend kept correcting me a few weeks ago and told me it's not proper English to use "neither". I told her she was wrong, but she still thinks she's right.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredSmith666

"Neither" is a negative eliminating all of two or more subjects. Neither you nor I may have the doughnut. "Either" requires a choice between two or more subjects. Either you may have the doughnut or I may have it. They are not interchangeable. ArtDK is most correct since "me" is an object pronoun and cannot be used properly in either of the sample sentences provided. "Either you can have the doughnut or me can have the doughnut" is clearly ridiculous.
Similarly "Neither you may have it or me can have it" is also silly.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chris.tiano

To put it simply, tampoco = neither, también = either

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

Right, and a more literal translation might help some people: "también = "as well" and "tampoco" = "as little"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dgatchell

I have had such a difficult time remembering the difference between these two words. With your simple hint, I won't forget again. TY!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

So glad to know it's helpful!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa4duolingo
lisa4duolingo
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Due to nesting limitations, I'm posting this here rather than elsewhere, so it will not appear to be a reply to CastorTroy (because it isn't a reply to CastorTroy). (This thread is so long, I don't know if you would even notice that this is nested under his comment, but in case you did, this explains why this post is inserted here.) Comments indicate confusion exists between a couple of words, so it may be good to start with a visual common point of reference:

According to the entries for "ni" and "tampoco" on www.spanishdict.com:

HTH

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brigid
Brigid
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Thanks for your effort at trying to bring some clarity to this discussion!! Have a lingot!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KIluI2

I love Charlie Brown too. Not as some one I want to date but I mean watching the movie. Have you seen "You're a good man Charlie Brown "?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brigid
Brigid
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I haven't. Just all the made for TV specials. =)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KIluI2

Wow,It is a good movie though

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KIluI2

Also,join my club. The code is UQAC9W

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KIluI2

Srsly (srsly=seriously )

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KIluI2

How did you get all that stuff

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrettJ22
BrettJ22
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I would have thought so too. Surely it´s dependent on the context, so independently it wouldn´t matter.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jyjoo
jyjoo
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i thought this was weird, too. also, I thought "Me, either." is grammatically more correct, whereas "Me, neither." is used more in everyday conversation.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iago
Iago
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A poster a bit down on the second URL you gave said it best. "Either" is used in a case like this when there's another word (e.g. "not") to negate it and "neither" is used when there is not.

Sam: I don't like it. Pat: Me, neither. Ali: I don't like it, either.

Me either also sounds clunky and awkward because of the double-"ee" sound (if you pronounce it like that). But "Me neither" is correct as is "Not me, either"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/David1945

I agree. 'me either' is wrong. Either is used when there is a choice 'either you or I', 'Either this or that" and Neither is used when there is a negation. 'me neither' that is we both do NOT want that.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mazdee

My "not me either" was not accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarcMGD
MarcMGD
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I agree that not me either should be accepted

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KIluI2

I mean they are two diffrent words but it could be possible

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wc2a031

That would be me también

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/claire65

I think we could say "neither am I" or "neither do I", which is more grammatical than "me neither"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/linburnlane

I don't run. Nor do I (formal) Me neither (colloquial)

I run. So do I / I do too (formal) Me too (colloquial)

"Me either" simply does not exist. In saying that, I'm confused between Yo tampoco and Ni yo. Can Ni yo be used as Me neither/Nor do I?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gr8rubs

Sí, son igual.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa4duolingo
lisa4duolingo
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I recently read a post from someone who asserts that "nor do I" is expressed in Spanish with "ni a mí" and specifically stated that the disjunctive


Chart of Spanish Personal Pronouns Showing the Disjunctive

form of the pronoun must be used. In fact, it was made in this very same thread by Howard in this post here.

You may also want to look at this post over here.

Regarding the legitimacy of '"me either" there appears to be more than one opinion on this. For the section of the thread related to this topic, I'd begin with Ranchers1 comment here. As for the existence of "me either," you can also visit this post here.

HTH

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bobsledred

I think Duolingo was created by non-English speakers.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyanGunn

Actually, I think it was created with the average american that doesn't know good grammar in mind. :p imagine if they tried "nor I," how many would be asking what that meant :p

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa4duolingo
lisa4duolingo
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Indeed, Ryan Gunn. If you need further evidence of that, view some of the gems I read in the discussion thread for "Ni yo":

"Nor I" seems really unnatural, ...

Who the heck says nor i versus me neither in real life conversation? It's not a Shakespeare play.

Well, I for one say nor I. But then I'm 75, which means I speak Middle English, no?

I'm in high school and I say nor I. Then again, I've also repeatedly been informed that I speak Middle English. :P

I don't get this sentence. When the heck do you use "Nor I" in Spanish AND English??

I don't think nor is a word

Nor i? Is that English?

'nor I' is old english and should be removed.

Nor I who says that

For the record, "nor I" is alive and well even if it isn't used as much anymore. If you didn't see the link I posted to my pseudoscientific research that included "nor I," here it is again:

Ni yo

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SandyBridge
SandyBridgePlus
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It's idiomatically correct. This is a "grammar flaw" that seems to have penetrated so deeply into usage that it isn't a marker for "poor education" any longer.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamaicarose2
jamaicarose2
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I see a pattern: Tambien = tam + bien (good) = too Tampoco = tam + poco (little) = neither So does "tam" mean something on its own?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcselman

I found out that the tam part comes from tan, which comes from tanto. Tanto means 'so much', 'as much' or 'very'. So tambien would be 'as well' or 'very much' and tampoco would be 'as little' or 'very little'.

I usually search for a word with etymology typed after it to find out a word's origins.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dhawal.Vaghela

I would like to know that too. Yo tambien.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NinaJohn

If you reverse the order from "me neither" to "neither do I", it makes sense. "Me either" doesn't make sense b/c it's "either do I" when you rearrange it. The trick is to start thinking in Spanish & to stop translating it in your head all the time!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SandyBridge
SandyBridgePlus
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Except of course that this is a translation exercise. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/357SoaringKites

I am very confused by all the posts - I don't understand advanced grammar in English or Spanish very well. Can anyone explain in simple terms why "neither am I" is not wrong?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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357SoaringKites, "Neither am I." (and also "Neither do I." or "Nor I." ) is the considered-gramatically correct way in standard English to agree to something negative that was said earlier.

For example: 1. PERSON A: I don't like cakes. PERSON B: Neither do I. (Person B could also say, "I don't either.", or "Me, too." in a very informal/slangy way of speaking.)

  1. PERSON A: I'm not tall. PERSON B: Neither am I. (Again, Person B could say, "I'm not either.", or "Me, too." in a very informal/slangy way of speaking.)

Nice username, btw.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/colen35
colen35
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Why would " I neither " not be right? Yo=I

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Howard
Howard
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As I said before, "I neither" is wrong because with no verb, the disjunctive pronoun is required.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rick_k
rick_k
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I love how learning a foreign language forces me to have a better mastery of my own native tongue. I had never heard the phrase "disjunctive pronoun" before. Thanks!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmericaLondon

yo tampoco...lol...I tried to be grammatically correct and input "I am neither" even though the "soy"was not there I figured it was a duolingo error guess not.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

"I am neither" means a completely different thing, as in "I am neither dead nor asleep; I'm merely resting my eyes." Therefor, it is not a correct translation of this sentence.

"Nor I" and "neither do I," on the other hand, should both be accepted. (Whether they are, I'm not sure right now.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MinombreesDJ

Yeah, but "me neither" is not correct English grammar either. And I've been teaching it for 27 years!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelBraxton

very interesting discussion but my question is not on the subject of the sentence. Instead I'd like to know if anyone knows what Duolingo means when in the drop down menu of word meanings for tampoco (and other words in addition to tampoco) the students (you and I) get the following: TAMPOCO - neither, either, not.............either. What does "not.......either" mean. my guess is that the dotted line is for a word to be filled in. Like 'not...him.....either'. Any thoughts on this subject?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MinombreesDJ

I believe your analysis is correct.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa4duolingo
lisa4duolingo
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Estoy de acuerdo con MinombreesDJ, but I'll add a bit more. The following is an excerpt from a free book I serendipitously found online.

If you have Google Play, a tablet or iPad, or even just access to the web, you should be able to read it. The link to the book is below:

Spanish Grammar

BTW, I can't help but notice that GaelBraxton is at a Level 25 and has an XP that is off the charts! ¡Enhorabuena! I would imagine that Gael knows all about "tampoco" by now and then some, but for those of you just starting out, there's a lot more than meets the eye when it comes to the word "tampoco." You may want to chew off just a little at a time. Sometimes more information serves to confuse rather than enlighten.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brigid
Brigid
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Lisa, your contributions to this discussion have been/are great. Thanks and have another lingot for all the work you've put in!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa4duolingo
lisa4duolingo
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Gracias, Brigid. I didn't think there'd be an opportunity for it in a course that's been out for a while, but sometimes a question gets lost in the thread and new people come to duolingo all the time adding new questions. Sometimes the same question(s) get asked over and over again, but for the most part, I'm impressed with the variety of questions that surface. Trying to answer some of them really helps me lock it in for myself, too. Most importantly, I hope it helps someone out there. Again, thank you for the compliment (and the lingot!!)!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rooseveltnut1

I always assumed that "neither" is just a shortened way to say "not either." I'm not really sure what you're asking here.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/justine911834

"neither I" would be correct as well

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AramPirjan

Tam (as) + poco (little): I as little :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

Duolingo doesn't want me to report problems here, but I'm sharing this in the discussion as well, because it should be helpful to others.

As of this post, Duolingo does not accept "I neither." I haven't tried "Nor I," but I hope Duolingo accepts that.

It may not be common, but "I neither" (or "nor I") would be the only proper translation in certain contexts, like when responding to a comment that someone else doesn't do something. "I don't run." "I neither" ("Me neither" would be incorrect, since "me" cannot run; only "I" can run.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MartinCo

I'll contrast the use of "tampoco" and "también". My friend from Spain corrects me all the time because I don't use tampoco when I should.

Tampoco is used in response to a negative statement and is like "me neither" Example: P1: "I didn't like the movie." P2: Me neither. [Yo tampoco.]

In contrast también would have been used with a positive sentence. P1: I liked the movie. P2: Me too [Yo también.]

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vinjudit

And what about 'neither me'? Why isn't that accepted?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa4duolingo
lisa4duolingo
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Though it is true that Spanish has a bit more flexibility in its word order than other languages (e.g., English), I don't believe it is that flexible with short phrases such as this. I think part of why your answer -- neither me -- might not have been accepted may be the fact that correct usage of it in English is so rare. While trying to find a real world example of its usage via the internet, the first thing I noticed was that Google only returned 2,110 news pages with this combination of words. Compare this to the 577,000,000 it returns with a search for the word "the," the most frequently used word in English. That's 273,460 times as many! Whenever you see a difference like that, it should set off a red flag for you that the phrase might not be grammatically correct. And I can assure you, this phrase is often used incorrectly.

To give you an idea of just how much, I went through 18 pages of results before I found a news article that used it correctly. Most of the publications that used it were not major publications with world-renowned reputations, but still, it was surprising to see so many use it incorrectly. Until I got to a New York Times article most of the articles I saw used "neither me" when they should have used "neither I." In English, "I" is a subject pronoun; "me" is an object pronoun. Those who are in the news business should know better.

Regardless, though the New York Times is not infallible, it is usually a pretty reliable guidepost for learning how to use English well and that includes adhering to standard rules of grammar and usage. The example I found from the New York Times is below, but I have to acknowledge something here. Although I am certain that writers for the New York Times know when to use "neither me" and "neither I," the example actually comes from the lawyer of one of America's finest authors, Harper Lee. I've pasted it below, but have added bolding and italics for educational purposes.

“If Sam discovered the ‘Go Set a Watchman’ manuscript at that time, he told neither me nor Miss Alice nor Nelle,” Ms. Carter said in the statement, using the name that family and friends call Ms. Lee.

Oddly enough, though Harper's lawyer does use "neither me" correctly in one sense, upon closer reading I now see that she uses a "neither ... nor" construction to negate more than two things, something most grammarians would frown upon. Oh well, it isn't the most egregious faux pas of English language usage. And, after looking through 18 pages in search of the proper use of "neither me," I'm not going to go look for more. Despite that, if you'd like to read the rest of the article, the link to it is below:

"Harper Lee’s ‘Go Set a Watchman’ May Have Been Found Earlier Than Thought"

You may also be interested in watching the film that was based off of Harper Lee's most famous book. Below is a link to a trailer for it:

MOVIE TRAILER TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD 1962

As a side note, To Kill a Mockingbird is considered a classic work of American literature and has been required reading for many U.S. high school students.

Now that I've established that you and I are both on the same sheet of music regarding the appropriate use of "neither me," let's move on to your question which was basically an inquiry over why "neither me" was not accepted as correct. As I mentioned earlier, and in other posts as well, duolingo does a commendable job of adding multiple alternative answers for the various items it tests users on. It seems unreasonable, however, that the developers should also add seldom used phrases that are often used incorrectly in English. Having said that, I would imagine that if the words for this prompt had been reversed --

"Tampoco yo," instead of "Yo tampoco," --

"Neither I," should have been the preferred translation with the slight potential that an alternative may have been added for those who prefer to incorrectly translate a subject pronoun (I) with an object pronoun (me).

Hope that helped.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vinjudit

Thank you, Lisa. It definitely did. And you are right about Google and the frequency of usage. I was taught "Neither me" 30 odd years ago (it was even in an English course book), but I can't remember meeting it in real life - ever.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vinjudit

BTW. I gave you a Lingot. ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Foomancrue

Is that a joke?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Howard
Howard
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https://www.duolingo.com/kallen129

me neither.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mjacobs

Why not "neither do I"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iago
Iago
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Because that would have to be in response to a specific thing... for example, "I don't like this food." "Neither do I." There it would be acceptable, but "They didn't tell me about it!" would not make "Neither do I" an appropriate response, whereas "Me neither" would still be fine.

With that response you are making undue presumptions on the context.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

I instinctively agreed with you before realizing that yours is an assumed context, too. mjacobs is right; without a specified context, either (any contextually correct) translation should be accepted.

mjacobs example is a more full way of saying "nor I," which should also be accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeoDennis

I think that is ok too

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Synesthete24

Now it is.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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I think "Me neither" is said in response to a negative statement: "I don't like golf." "Me neither."

But "Me either" is used just as much although it probably isn't grammatically correct.

I am glad that Señor lago (above) told us "Tambien" can be used for "Me too." I had that word in my brain as "also." "Tambien tenemos una buena seleccion de libros." Glad to know that I can response to "Necessito una cerveza." with "Yo tambien."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iago
Iago
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It would be "Yo también" or, in another case, such as responding to "Me gusta este restaurante" it would be "A mí también." The word también by itself wouldn't make much sense :þ Other than that I think you've got it.

Oh, also, it's an upper-case i, not a lower-case L :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Howard
Howard
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I've never heard anyone say "Me either" except perhaps as a joke. Is doesn't make sense to me.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

"También" does indeed mean "also," which is exactly why "yo también" means "me/I also/too."

If you want to consider the etymology, take a look at "también" as if putting "tan" and "bien" together, and look at "tampoco" as if putting "tan" and "poco" together. También = "as well" and tampoco = "as little."

On the side: I've also never seen "me either" be used, but I'm sure it's a colloquial thing. Neither (see what I did there?) "me neither" or "me either" are technically correct grammar, and that's okay.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iakobski

why is "not me either" marked wrong?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Howard
Howard
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It would be possible, but not normal, except in a specific context (i.e. if one person said "Not me" another could add "Not me either."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mark49948

@Iakobski, I agree "not me either" is the same as "me neither" since both convey a negative conjunction (one being done with a single word, and the other with two words < but same net result > The format of your reply is not dependent on what another party may have said, so I agree with your response Iakobski

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa4duolingo
lisa4duolingo
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Iakobski posted the above quite some time ago and since he is now at a Level 20, I would think he is well past this by now, but for those of you who have a similar question, here are my two cents.

My first thought when I saw this was Wouldn't "no a mí tampoco" be a better equivalent for "not me either? " I know the following are synonymous,

me neither
me either
neither do I

but once you begin straying from the literal and/or primary meaning of a word, original intent can start to get "lost in translation." It can become similar to a good old-fashioned round of "The Telephone Game." I sense that the developers of this course and the other courses here at duolingo do feel an obligation to add alternatives when those alternatives adhere to a consensus of opinion on standard rules of grammar. They also add alternatives that are less than standard but commonly used. I don't think they serve the users well when they start adding every possible translation someone thinks should be accepted for whatever reason.

I doubt that was what iakobski was suggesting, but I see many discussion threads with posts containing a tone of malcontent regarding why an answer couldn't be correct. With some, I almost get the impression they'd rather have their answer be considered correct than actually be correct. Some of you will understand exactly what I mean by that. For those who don't, you may not have read enough discussion threads yet. Either way, it's all good. Usually, in the end, what we get out of something is what we put into it.

For whomever stumbled upon this post, I hope it either answered a question you had or gave you some food for thought. And as always, hope it helped.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rebotica

Me too ??

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Howard
Howard
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Different meaning. "Me too" would be "Yo también."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/comradezack

I understand that 'I neither' makes no sense but i've always thought 'neither I' was grammatically proper.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa4duolingo
lisa4duolingo
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"I neither" does make sense, but it does sound kind of odd when not used with "nor." I wouldn't say it doesn't make sense though. Here are some real world examples taken straight from present day newspaper articles (with added bolding for educational purposes):

"I neither expect to be living in the house 13 years from now, nor do I entertain the thought of spending several hours a day on a ladder at age 79."
--From an article in the Seattle Times

"We’ve been talking on the phone every day lately, which sometimes means I call her crying, or more often, she calls at random intervals to dispense career advice that I neither requested nor agree with."
--From an article in the Village Voice

"I Cannot Tell A Lie: I Neither Admit Nor Deny I Chopped Down The Cherry Tree"
--A headline for a Forbes article

HTH

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/writeli

Was “Nor I" accepted?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa4duolingo
lisa4duolingo
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You posted the above a while back, writeli, but it does appear you are still studying Spanish, so I'll go ahead and answer it. From what I've seen, the best translation for "nor I" is "ni yo."

The only answers I am aware of that are acceptable translations for "yo tampoco," as a stand-alone phrase, are "me neither" and "me either" (although some do not agree that "me either" should be considered acceptable because its standing as a grammatically correct phrase is tenuous if not flat out nonexistent to some).

If I am wrong on this or you know of others duolingo accepts as correct answers for "yo tampoco," please post them in a reply to this.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/felixiss

The discussion below doesn't seem to cover the answer 'Nor me' which was marked as wrong although 'Nor I' and 'Me neither' were offered as correct. If these are correct, then 'Nor me' must also logically be correct as Duolingo treats the accusative first person pronoun as acceptable. (And it is correct anyway!).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NormanBerry

Yo also means I but your system has given me wrong again.Norman.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

Be sure to click the "report a problem" button for comments like this! The discussion threads are great for help from peers, but if you want the Duolingo team to correct something, you need to choose "report a problem." (For example, I've reported that "nor I" should be accepted.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MommaDiestel

what about - Me tampoco

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

"Me" is used with verbs to indicate that the action is being done to you, as in "me gusta" (it/she/he pleases me) or "me quieres (you love/want me). Since "tampoco" is not a verb, I don't think "me tampoco" is a sensical phrase.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MommaDiestel

Thank you

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Foomancrue

I tried "Neither do I" And got dinged. I am still unsure what tampoco means.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

Okay, so in practice "me neither" is often used in place of "neither do I" (despite that one is using the first person OBJECT and the other is the first person SUBJECT), so I think most speakers would agree that "yo tampoco" could mean "neither do I." However, technically "neither do I" is a completely different phrasing, which in Spanish should be "hago tampoco," unless I'm mistaken. I suspect this is why Duolingo doesn't accept your translation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Foomancrue

Two follow up questions:: We learned earlier that "Ni Yo" means "Nor I" so if "Yo tampoco" means "Me neither" then... I don't know how to turn this in to a question. And my second question is why can't we all just speak American? Especially on Christmas, the day Americ was born.

So what would the sentence "Yo no tampoco tambien" mean?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

I believe "yo no tampoco bien" can be most closely translated as "I am trolling you, possibly inebriated, on Christmas eve." ; )

Feliz Navidad, amigos.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Foomancrue

Just trying to wrap my ahead around tampoco. Don't give up on me and I won't give up on you. Happy Festivus.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HannahandH

Difference between Ni and Tampoco

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gr8rubs

If you want to say "either this or that" in Spanish you'd say "o esto o eso" literally "or this or that." The negative form "neither this nor that" is "ni esto ni eso" which is literally "nor this nor that". When you want to express the word "also" that's when you say "también" and the negative form is "tampoco". The difference is in how you'd use them. If someone asks ¿Quieres esta manzana o esa? and you really don't want either of them you might say; No quiero ni esta ni esa. (We'd NEVER use that many negatives in English in one sentence.) If your friend says he doesn't like apples "No me gustan las manzanas" and you agree with him that's when you say "Yo tampoco."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mjcm94

Is there a rule to know when I should use "Mi" instead of "Yo", for example would it be incorrect for me to say " mi tampoco"? Thanks in advance

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

In my experience so far, "mi" is used to indicate two things: first-person possession of the object that follows (as in "my"); and a first person indirect object (someone who is receiving something), as in "...para mi."

Also, don't forget that "with me" and "with you" each have their own special words: "conmigo" and "contigo."

As far as I know, all other cases use "yo," for both "I" and "me."

I bet someone else can provide a better, more experienced answer.

(Oh, and "mi tampoco" is incorrect; that would say "my neither.")

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mjcm94

Many thanks for this explaination, I would give you a lingot but I am broke atm

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyeNewton

Happy to help! (But if a more experienced Spanish speaker has anything to correct or add, please do!)

Also, as it turns out, I have 933 lingots, so I think I'll give YOU one. : )

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa4duolingo
lisa4duolingo
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Well, there are rules and then there are exceptions to rules that can assume any number of forms. Perhaps the best rules to learn are those related to the cases. We don't learn cases in English, but we do learn about direct objects and indirect objects which are, in effect, the accusative case and the dative case, respectively.

We also learn about the object of the preposition which is a form of what is called the disjunctive pronoun. It is one of two types of pronouns found in Spanish. The other is called the conjunctive pronoun. In a nutshell, which is about the size of what I actually know about these two types of pronouns, the conjunctive pronouns are those that precede a verb. They take different forms. For a good intro to this topic, click on the link below:

Disjunctive and Conjunctive Pronouns

I added a portion of a chart that lays out the various forms of the pronouns in a separate post. It is something I found on a Wiktionary page. You can find the full chart by visiting any page Wiktionary has for any of the Spanish pronouns. You'll find a sampling of it in this post here, which is further up this thread. I also used it to make a chart of my own. I could keep it to myself, but why not share it? Here it is:

We learn a lot more about our own language than what I've mentioned here and there's a lot more to learn about the Spanish language that will not always have a corresponding rule or form in English. In fact, each language has its own set of fixed expressions that are difficult to translate word for word. However, I think what I put in this post are the aspects of the Spanish language that are most relevant to the question you asked above.

BTW, I think tyeNewton did a good job of addressing your question and since he's at a Level 22 and I am at an 11, there's a good chance he knows twice as much as I do, but I saw an opportunity to contribute, so I did. Hope it helps.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Benzy911
Benzy911
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So annoying ! Guys help me out to not write "I" instead of "Yo" when I'm on spanish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/trenton

"I" too (just a joke ),. It takes practice. Proof read when writing in Spanish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Benzy911
Benzy911
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there's only proof read ?! let's say you're speaking to someone..

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/trenton

You were speaking of writing. It's still, practice, writing or speaking. IMHO

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brayan.nunez

I am not chinese and you are not chinese either.. can I use "neither" instead of "either" for my sentence? thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MehreenSuzaan

sounds like a yogurt brand

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamGeelhood72582

I didn't get why the answer was, ;neither do I

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamGeelhood72582

I didn't get why the answer was neither do I.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KMonster4

I had "me neither", but said I was wrong, the answer "me either" I then put "me either" it is correct but then says it is also fine to write "me neither"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sansan858784

So how can we say "me either" in other way?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lrnrlynx

Me: I dont always understand DUO.

DUO: Yo tampoco.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/happyaxelo

why not mi instead of yo

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/w23pfaff

this question is terible

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chris913144

Isn't neither not either?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kama410
Kama410
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Commenting to follow this.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/English_2016

Hello, my name is Renato, I´m currently looking for people to practice ( speak ) my English and Spanish, ( language partners ), I can help you practice your Portuguese ( Brazil ); My Facebook = ( Re Gue Za ); Thank You.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mark49948

I replied "Not me either" : which seems should be acceptable.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JACQUELINE537531

I agree not good English

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nancyhall4

I answered correctly

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/john414534
john414534
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My clumsy finger hit the wrong button before I could finish typing and I am having trouble continuing now.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Caelan_Jolley

¿Por qué usar “yo” y no usar “me”?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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Nor do I, Nor did I, Nor am I, etc etc etc

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/whitehall6407

How about, "Not me either"?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lando77089

I typed in neither I for my answer and it said it was wrong and that the correct answer was actually neither do i. That does not make any sense. How did do get in that sentence if there aren't even any verbs in the Spanish?

3 months ago