"Tá bia ó fhear."

Translation:A man wants food.

3 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/artiguesmommy

Certainly did not catch the "fhear" in this. Learned something new. But now I wonder about the pronunciation of "bhfear".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trodaire

Eclipsed words change the pronunciation from the original letter to the new letter(s). In this case bh makes the v sound. The f is now not pronounced making it "vear" though the pronunciation would be "var". Unfortunately I dont have an IPA keyboard.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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I thought bhfear would be okay too, is that because it's in the indefinite?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Magh-Roith

i believe so. nouns are lenited if they follow ó and other prepositions. Fear, lenited is Fhear. Bhfear is the eclipsed form of fear.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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Yeah, I figured that out about a month after writing the question. :) But thank you for replying, I appreciate it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
becky3086
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Oh look something else new!! That we have never seen before!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CMitchCarroll

Why is the fh silent here?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sean.mullen
sean.mullen
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Fh is always silent in Irish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
becky3086
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How does this even say "wants"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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Irish doesn't really have a verb for wanting. Instead, a preposition is used. So if you want to say that a person x wants a thing y, in English you would say "x wants y", but in Irish you say "is y from x".

Another way to look at it is that it says "is y (away) from x" - that is, "x is lacking y".

The preposition is ó, and means "from". And , as you know, means "is". So if you want to say that somebody wants food, it goes like this:

  • tá bia ó fhear = a man wants food (fear is lenited)
  • tá bia ón bhfear = the man wants food (fear is eclipsed)

And then, like other prepositions (you've probably seen ag already), ó also changes form when you use personal pronouns, like this:

  • tá bia uaim = I want food
  • tá bia uait = you want food (singular you)
  • tá bia uaidh = he wants food
  • tá bia uaithi = she wants food
  • tá bia uainn = we want food
  • tá bia uaibh = you want food (plural you)
  • tá bia uathu = they want food

It's definitely confusing at first but with some practice it's not that weird. :) I encourage you to read the tips notes sections on the first prepositions skill, it's all very well explained there.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
becky3086
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Still don't understand and I ALWAYS read the tips section. Most of the time it isn't understandable until you get into the lesson. I get all these last ones that were listed. We used all those in the lesson but we never used "o" for anything in the lesson. I don't know when you use it or why and I definitely don't understand how "a man wants food" can be written both ways. Is there a difference between them or do they mean exactly the same thing? If they mean the same thing, which one is more commonly used?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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Generally speaking, ó is for indefinite nouns, ón is for singular definite nouns (since it's a contraction of ó + an), and the uaim/uait/etc are for pronouns.

I don't really understand what you mean about both ways, though, could you please clarify? Or are you talking about tá/teastaíonn both being able to mean "want"? If it's the latter, it's debated whether you can use both or how, since different native speakers do it differently. There are discussions about exactly that all over the forums. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
becky3086
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I have no idea what indefinite nouns are or singular definite nouns are...I do no understand why "the man wants food" can be written both these ways. (I actually get the need and want difference). tá bia ó fhear = a man wants food (fear is lenited) tá bia ón bhfear = the man wants food (fear is eclipsed)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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Definite means you're talking about a specific thing, and indefinite about a generic.

So the definite of man is "THE man", and the indefinite is "A man". That's why they're different - one is for THE and one is for A.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/richard547513
richard547513
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This is what makes it difficult to listen to a native speaker. fhear is pronounced "ar". When you see it written down you know what it is but hearing it it just gets lost.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie-Clai133496

Why is it " ó fhear " , lenition, from a man and "ón bhfear" eclipse, from the man.

If that's just the way it is, is it the same in the Ulster dialect I wonder ?

1 day ago
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