"De elsker bygda."

Translation:They love the village.

May 26, 2015

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adysah

I heard Norwegians don't use "elsker" very often, and it is much stronger than "love". I noticed though on duolingo it's used almost as often as "liker" and for trivial things such as the one in this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fveldig
Mod
  • 316

It's much stronger when said to people. The rest of the time it means roughly the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElectorDark

The audio is a bit confusing — it sounded like "vi elsker bygda", without "de"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lqvaughn

Can "de" mean "they" and "the"? and if so, how to you keep them straight?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luke_5.1991

It's all about context. Before an adjective, "de" means either "the" or "those," but before a verb, it means "they."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grrrlinde

So what is the indefinite form? En bygd?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Regney
  • 2339

It's a feminine noun, so if you're in the habit of using the definite form, 'bygda,' you should go with 'ei bygd'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Error440044

I got it wrong and it said that "bygda" means "the hamlet". I've never heard that word used for anything other than the play.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Regney
  • 2339

By definition, hamlet means a small settlement, generally smaller than a village.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbadob

Sadly, hamlet is not a diminutive of the word ham like I thought it might be. It is related to "home", though.

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Reconstruction:Proto-Germanic/haimaz

It comes from the Frankish word *haim, through Old French.

[2019/05/03]

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