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  5. "I want to meet them later."

"I want to meet them later."

Translation:Jeg vil møte dem senere.

May 26, 2015

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlsEenPoffertje

Is there much of a difference between "senere" and "seinere"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iorua

They mean exactly the same thing. You will find many word pairs like these in Norwegian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlsEenPoffertje

Ah, okay! Tusen takk! :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ahoyitstalbot

You're Dutch, right? By your username. Dutch is one of my top 5 prettiest languages!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hmada993

Is seinere Nynorsk?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pele_

Veeery late answer, but no, seinere is not nynorsk. "Senere" and "seinere" are both accepted forms of the word in bokmål, while "seinare" would be the nynorsk equivalent.

https://ordbok.uib.no/perl/ordbok.cgi?OPP=sein&ant_bokmaal=5&ant_nynorsk=5&begge=+&ordbok=begge


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MonikaS777

What is the difference between "møte" and "treff" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukeYoung6

I think møte indicates more of an arrangement, and treff is more of the first contact, becoming acquaintances and such. However that is just a guess based on the contexts they are used in in my experience, I have wondered that myself.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jorun-la

It depends on the context. The verb "å treffe" is maybe more a short meeting where you just say hi, while "å møte" might imply that you're talked a little bit longer. You will definitely be understood if you mix them, so you should not worry about that!

"Møte" as a noun is just like the word "meeting" in english. "Jeg har et møte med kollegaene mine" = "I have a meeting with my colleagues".

(Another fact about "å treffe" that might confuse you even more: "Å treffe" could in another context also mean "to hit" as in "Jeg treffer målet" = "I am hitting the target".)

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