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"Hun drar fra ham."

Translation:She is leaving him.

3 years ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Noelinho

Is this purely in a physical context, or does the metaphor work in Norwegian as well (i.e. another way of saying a couple are breaking up)?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vildand91

Hm, you could use it for that, but most would understand it as a physical context. But, if you change "drar" with "går" it would be a metaphor for breaking up that is very commonly used. "Hun går fra ham" -> "She is leaving (walking away from) him"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RunaNasafi

Yes, I think so, it was like personal feeling mix up with learning app!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/catm934

I think of drar as 'setting out'... So it makes sense to me as:
"drar til"= setting out TO (going); "drar fra" = setting out FROM (leaving);

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jess.Schoolcraft

That's incredibly helpful. Thanks!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0Whiteraven0
0Whiteraven0
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Duo

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vianne_Rocher

To leave as in "split up" with him- the most correct way would be "Hun forlater ham".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Semantiq

Couldn't "She goes from him" work?

I understand some context would be lost, but even so?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m.g.doyle

It does have that meaning, but that's not really an English usage.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aattilio

Why is the following not accepted? "She is leaving from him." ( =from his place) Is that not grammatically correct in English? (I'm not a native speaker.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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No, for once in English we don't use the preposition in this case. "She leaves his place." or "She leaves him." but you can use "from" with the word " go": "She goes from there to here."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aattilio

thank you

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IlyaMaxisG

All you talking about lesson and nobody cares about a "poor guy"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mprdo
mprdo
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Ilya, he may be well rid of her. 6May17

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JegHeterKordian

If I heard correctly "ham" is not really that much used in Norway and "han" should be correct. Is that true?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xeins1
Xeins1
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I believe "ham" means him, and "han" means his.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/katyushayeka

r.i.p

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/forkMe

Please tell me that "fra" in this case is either possessive or reflexive noun this time, I am still getting confused of it, to not saying "She is leaving from him"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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You cannot translate word for word from one language to another "drar fra" means "leave". The Norwegian verb requires the preposition, while the English verb does not this time. "fra" does mean "from", which we do use with the verb "goes", but not in this context.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chris882231

Bummer

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveV17
DaveV17
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About time! I been telling her for ages she could do so much better than that dog.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Patrick238912

Shouldn't 'fra ham' mean some like from him?

1 month ago