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https://www.duolingo.com/kelvin5473

Interesting maps for Spanish language

kelvin5473
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The first one is of the different accent/dialect groups. I think it gives a pretty good idea of what type of spanish to expect in these areas. Interesting fact: The Caribbean accent of Spanish was HEAVILY influenced by the Spanish of the Canary Islands and to a lesser extant Andalusian spanish.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c3/Variedades_principales_del_espa%C3%B1ol.png

This next one is of the use of the voseo in Hispano America. As shown by the map most countries have populations that use the voseo.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e0/Voseo-extension-real.PNG

This map shows the use of Español vs. Castellano when referring to the language. Im not sure how accurate this map is but i do know that castellano is most common in argentina.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/32/Castellano-Espa%C3%B1ol-en.png

The next map is of the Chavacano language in the Philippines which is a Spanish based creol. The second image contains a Chavacano sentence that any spanish speaker could easily understand. There is also a video if anyone wants to hear what is sounds like.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/37/Chavacano_language_map.png/300px-Chavacano_language_map.png

http://image.slidesharecdn.com/aprendechavacano-00ortography-130906034602-/95/aprende-chavacano-00-ortography-18-638.jpg?cb=1378439644

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tarnY9zIWQ8

This last map is of the the pronunciation of s, c followed by e or i, and z in Spain. The dark blue is your typical "lisp" sound. Though not really a lisp just a way to distinguish s from z and soft c. The z and soft c are the "lisp" sound. Then you have seseo in the light blue. Seseo is the latin american way of pronouncing s, soft c, and z aka what your learning in duolingo. Lastly you have ceceo which from what i understand is pronouncing the s as z and the z as s. Also i read ceceo is kind of frowned upon. also note that many of the original colonist from spain came from the seseo speaking south.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/15/Ceceo-seseo-distinci%C3%B3n_en_el_espa%C3%B1ol_de_Europa.png

3 years ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/airelibre
airelibre
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The use of castellano is mostly political. For instance you see that in the Galician Basque and Catalan areas they use mostly castellano because they believe that their languages (galego, euskara and català) are also "Spanish" in that they are spoken widely in Spain. I believe that in Argentina and other countries they use castellano because they are not in Spain so why would they be speaking Spanish.

Ceceo is pronouncing s, c, and z a bit like English "th". It is only frowned on by people who associate it with people of a lower social class.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kelvin5473
kelvin5473
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I wasn't sure about ceceo since what i was reading was a little confusing. yea in Spain it may be political but in the americas it may also be because castellano was the original name for spanish and it spread to some parts but not to others kinda like voseo. Thanks for the info!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pabos95
pabos95
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To what I know is the contrary, voceo was used in all the Spanish empire, but then came the tu and the parts that had most connection with Spain ( such as Mexico and Peru) adopted it and others (Central America for example) don't changed. Later in XX Century tuteo use expanded because of Mexican media.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/no.name.42
no.name.42
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From what I've read you only pronounce c and z as th and pronouncing s as th is looked down on.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maryell20

Interesting thread all around, but this one from the Grinning Smiler stops me in my tracks. I recall my one year of high school Spanish and to the best of my recall this c & z dialect comes closest to what we "received." It was high class and/or educated class I was told and "that's how you want to speak". (circa mid century) And it was called "Castilian."

Some years later I wondered, well how about the highly educated people in, say, South America. This has all left me still wondering just how I want to pronounce things. Right now, I am "hit and miss" and tend towards the c & z thing, with not being sure about the s. A big Thank You to all for sharing your thoughts, especially to GS, and also the originator who supplied the maps.

3 years ago