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"No recuerdo mi clave."

Translation:I do not remember my code.

4 years ago

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/lphoenix

Being a drummer and percussionist, I was intrigued that "clave" would mean a code, since the claves I play are round wooden sticks and can be extremely crucial to sustain throughout a number. So now I find my dictionary also defines clave as something that is "key" -- as in crucial or critical, as in "the key to happiness," along with being a harpsichord, or a clef. These meanings make me feel this noun is a crucial key to a cosmic code.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hejmsdz
hejmsdz
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Hi, fellow musician! Clave has one more musical meaning that drummers may not care about: a key [signature], the central, most important note (pitch) of a piece. A song can be in the key of G major, sol mayor in Spanish. By the way, I was surprised that they use those do, re, mi names, whereas the rest of the world has the letters c, d, e and so on.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Herb13
Herb13
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Compañeros músicos, your comments are absolutely fascinating. I'm mainly a keyboard player, but learned to play percussion at a fairly early age. My first percussion instrument besides the piano? Claves! Now I know it's a key as well as something crucial or critical. Love the key to a cosmic code inference. Of course, as músicos, we already knew that :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rooseveltnut1

And there is the percussion instrument the clavichord. Just saying.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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When I was a child taking private piano lessons and learning do re mi in elementary school I never understood the two ways. Do re mi are just ways to refer to the scale degrees tonic submediant mediant etc. It is called solfège and is a variante of something developed in the eleventh century. It was based on the first sounds of the words in a latin hymn although the ut was changed to do and when a seventh note was added it was originally si. I have heard that there are some people who use a fixed solfège where do always represents C not just in the key of C but I havent seen it. But solvège is common in Romance and Slavic languages.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/krael1
krael1
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I don't know about the rest of the world, but in french it's also do re mi...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hejmsdz
hejmsdz
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Ok, that was an exaggeration - countries where Romance language are spoken use the solfège, but English speakers, as well as Slavic and Germanic nations, prefer the letters. I'm Polish and dealing with some notes in English and German made me think it's "rest of the world", but in fact, that's not the case.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/whgodwin
whgodwin
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England and Wales also know do, re, mi... These are relative names of notes in the heptatonic scale -- they do not correspond to C, D, E. FYI!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98
LICA98
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well in Russian do re mi are also used... - -

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DolevFreun

Greetings from a flute and piano player in Israel, where they also use Do Re Mi!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lierluis
lierluis
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What's the difference between clave and código?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth261736

My guess is that código is more complex like computer code or the codes used during the war for espionage or secrets. Clave seems like it may be something similar like a door code or password.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rooseveltnut1

That's is correct.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth261736

Thank you. Have a lingot.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mateomijo
Mateomijo
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Thanks for the explanation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdhicks1
cdhicks1
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Synonymous meanings abound:

clave=code (concept/password/music)

codigo=code(access/conduct/law/business and science)

contraseña=password

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JellyLady1

Just a little insight. Many of the Spanish speaking students in my ESL classes use "clave" for the "key" or code number when wiring money, and codigo for zip code when filling in demographic information on forms.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

in earlier examples DL used clave for "KEY code" and I thought it was a contraction of "codijo" and "llave" but noe it is JUST "code"? Why not just use "codijo" for code if it is not meant to be "key code" ie ( a series of numbers you punch into a lock, safe, etc) as opposed to a code, which could mean key code, a coded message, etc.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

the "hints" say clave can also mean " to drive something into something"?? is that true? Is it a verb ? Does it mean to drive a car into something, drive a nail into something,....?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Syzygy6

"Clavar" means "to nail/hammer" something.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EricSmith253391

"Clavo" means "nail."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaered
chaered
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https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Spanishdict translates this sentence as "I don't remember my password". I'll try that next time.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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2 minutes later ... Duolingo accepts "I don't remember my password".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OneVerce

"clave" deberia reemplazar con una palabra mas conocido como "contraseña"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeredithNa
MeredithNa
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From the other discussions, this means code as in password/PIN number etc.

However, can this mean "code" as in something you live your life by?

For example: "Forget the code! They're more like guidelines anyway!" "Olvide el clave! Son mas como directrices de todos modos!" (I had to use Google for that - sorry)

Or the Wiccan Code (the proper word is Rede as it comes from Middle English) "And it harm none, do what ye will" "y perjudica a nadie, haz lo que quieras"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jedimark64
jedimark64
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I forgot my key... No?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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No.

The concepts are the same, but if you're looking for agreement from other people about what a computer program should allow, then I'm happy as a programmer to tell you Duo is not that smart and that you need to work closer with the program.

The original is a negation. Yours is affirmative. Theirs users 'remember'. Yours isn't even a synonym, it's an antonym. I haven't yet seen Duo accept an antonym.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OttenhoffJohn

Should "I don't remember my PIN" have been accepted? If not, what is the translation for PIN?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/virharding

I said PIN and got it wrong also. PIN is always "clave" on ATMs. I guess all PINs are codes but not all codes are PINs.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EdUC6R

The female speaker mumbles excessively

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexanderEBoyer

I was taught in my Spanish class that key was "llave". Any truth to this?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BartMilner

My understanding is that llave is always physical, and usually made of metal whereas clave is not used in the sense of "I have lost my keys". It looks as if both (and the English word) derive from the latin clavis, but that's only a guess.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/clave uses "la clave del éxito" as its first example, and I see similar uses frequently in nacion.com (the Costa Rican newspaper) where it is very common.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alicia2017

There is INCONSISTENCY between the audio and the Text with this statement Two questions ago I responded wth the answer above in TEXT and it was marked WRONG because I did not use DE, yet in the audio it is accepted

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jumcbee

The pronunciation of the word "clave" is difficult to understand.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim294818

its codigo and i'm sticking with that!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/indra1081

And yet their own translation for clave is key and when I used that I was told it was wrong. Lame...

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Seaquaker2

I put in 'keycode' for 'clave'. DL rejected this!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EDK-Learner
EDK-Learner
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Why is "I do not remember my key" incorrect? I thought "codigo" was the word for "code." In many computer applications, you have to type in a key word or number to gain access and people often forget their keys.

3 months ago