"Du er en kvinne."

Translation:You are a woman.

May 28, 2015

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elbose

Anyone know if kvinne and queen are etymologically related? They sound similar and 'queen' as far as I'm aware is not related to any of it's latin language counterparts.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ungewitig_Wiht

Yes they are. Someone asked this on Swedish (woman is kvinna) and since the North Germanic languages are essentially a dialect continuum, the words kvinna and kvinne are almost certainly related; therefore both are related to queen (originally queen was spelled cwen before pronunciation changes and adoption of Q)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elbose

Sorry, couldn't wait for a response - anyway Wiktionary suggests it is - http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/queen :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tieeemen

So for female nouns, when do you use 'en' or 'ei'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeminiFireRat

En is masculine and ei is feminine. You can replace feminine with masculine though. Ei kvinne and En kvinne are both correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peter1368

du er ei kvinne ....ikke sant ?


[deactivated user]

    Du er ei kvinne and Du er en kvinne are equally correct. However, in a listening exercise you have to type what you heard and not what you usually associate with that noun.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Waylon63300

    I keeps marking qrong when im right


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeffreyJ.P

    Du is known as You gender neutral.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saritaanin1

    Why the 'en' pronounced like N and the 'er' pronounced like R (not ar in arrow)?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex837814

    I'm guessing there's even less verb conjugation in Norweigan than in English. Seems like "er" is cognate with "are", but is also used where us English speakers would say "am" or "is".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex837814

    I'm pretty sure "du" is a cognate of "thou", which I've read was pronounced something like "dthoo" in Old English. And it was spelled as "þu".

    Learn Norwegian (Bokmål) in just 5 minutes a day. For free.