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  5. "De er helt fantastiske!"

"De er helt fantastiske!"

Translation:They are completely fantastic!

May 28, 2015

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VitGryfny

Why 'hel' has -t at the end? What is neuter here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DennisThom9

Because "helt" is not an adjective in this sentence. That's just a general rule in norwegian. When the adjective does not comprehend with the subject of the sentence, then it should be a -t at the end. Don't know the details of the rule, but check google for answers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruce-CallMeSoda

I don't understand your use of the word "comprehend" here. What does "comprehend with the subject" mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ms_World

It's the wrong word, that's why. I believe they meant 'correspond'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/odi_et_amo

I think it is because helt is actually an adverb formed from an adjective. It just looks like a neuter adjective.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jug89

Can someone explain this little more?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferTauber

In English adverbs are formed from adjectives by adding -ly. Complete > Completely. In Norwegian an adverb is formed from an adjective by using the neuter form of the adjective. Hel > Helt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yakuul

Same thing in Croatian/Serbian! Love learning those random similarities!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/natkoba

In Croatian adverbs are not formed by adding -t. Usually by -o. Not sure about Serbian. I guess most Slavic languages have similar thing with -o ending.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luka-cola

Fantastiske is a fantastic word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaurentMontesi

I keep hearing something like "hjelt". Is it supposed to have a "i" sound in "he" in norwegian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soma292731

I often hear that kind of sound too when there's a "he" letters combination. What about the verb å hete then? It sounds like there's indeed an i sound between the h and the e letters


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/katawalker

somehow I thought that one would only put the e in the end when something follows, like fantastiske mennesker...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruce-CallMeSoda

I think the "e" here is because the subject is plural. De = They (plural).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fool444luv

so........not just a little fantastic, then?...:)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heithr

I am wondering why totally is not an acceptable translation for helt? Totally and completely are synonyms, as are utterly, fully, and wholly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BafouillCharabia

totally is accepted now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/3Rav3n3

I just used totally and was marked wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SanctMinimalicen

Can this word be used for "fantastical", i.e. imaginary, quixotic, non-existent?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alek_d
Mod
  • 480

Yes, but most would interpret the word as it is in the sentence in isolation to mean "fantastic" or "terrific".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SanctMinimalicen

That makes sense. Thanks for putting up with my obnoxious questions! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rogermaioli

Isn't "really" the most natural English translation for "helt" here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alek_d
Mod
  • 480

What about completely/totally/wholly/absolutely/entirely that we do accept. "Really" would be closer to "virkelig".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErikEllefs

Wholly gets my vote to help remember it. That's what i thought of too!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rogermaioli

"Totally" and "absolutely" seem pretty natural as well. But "completely" and "wholly" sound jarring to me. (Maybe it's just me?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GregHolmes7

Reminds me of the TV show "Absolutely Fabulous" ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruce-CallMeSoda

Another sentence in this unit is "Jeg liker hele deg". Many discussion questions were posted there asking why that one is "hele" and not "hel". None of those questions have been answered. Can someone explain why it is "hele" there, and "helt" here?

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