"Ĉu la kafo estas bona aŭ malbona?"

Translation:Is the coffee good or bad?

3 years ago

57 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MultiLinguAlex
MultiLinguAlex
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First, ĉu standing alone means really?, but not standing alone, ĉu introduces and signalizes a yes/no question.

Second, putting mal in front of an adjective reverses its meaning (bona - good, malbona - bad). Hope this helps!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Camryn-B

But "Is the coffee good or bad?" Isn't a yes or no question..?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mathso2
Mathso2
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It is however a closed question.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JobMaven

So does that mean it is used for yes/no questions and those whose answers are limited to the choices within the question?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Si1vanu5

Yes. "Coffee, tea or juice?" or "Do you want coffee?" would be closed-ended questions. "Do you like coffee?" could be either open-ended or closed-ended depending on the situation. If your at the breakfast table and the person asking is holding a pot of coffee... Or are you with a group of people discussing beverage choices... Ĉu indicates that the questioner is waiting for a quick, simple choice.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyleKane1
KyleKane1
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A closed question is one that has a limited number of responses due to what is said in the question. A yes/no question is a good example of closed questions so in that case, one would use ĉu. It's like Polish, with ce; the rules are exactly the same.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/natsukilove2

It's technically called a polar question though I think closed question was a good way to explain the ambiguity.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdinaB.

THIS IS GOOD TO KNOW

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sf2k
sf2k
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great, thank you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jaiveersingh
jaiveersingh
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So "mal" is like "un" in English yeah ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MultiLinguAlex
MultiLinguAlex
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No, mal- means opposite of and that are all negative affixes like un-, dis-, in- etc combined.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jaiveersingh
jaiveersingh
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That's what I wanted to know, thank you very much. :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tunglskin
Tunglskin
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Thank you for the explanation! Much appreciated.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dannielle70

Thanks, MultiLinguAlex!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MitchialStones

Thanks

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kiryo
Kiryo
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Romance language learners, don't think of mal- as of something bad: it just changes the word to its opposite meaning, e. g. fermi (to close) - malfermi (to open).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hjulle
Hjulle
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This makes me think of Newspeak: malbona = ungood.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dejo
Dejo
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The reason it makes you think of Newspeak is that George Orwell was visiting his aunt in Paris, who was married to a famous Esperantist by the name of Lanti. They only spoke Esperanto at home and poor George was mostly in the dark, but that's where he got his idea for Newspeak.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zaambeze
Zaambeze
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Lanti (which comes from the French "l'anti", which means "the person who is against [everything]") is the founder of SAT. I attend SAT-Amikaro babilrondoj in Paris to talk in Esperanto with fellow esperantistoj :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sierscarf

That was my first thought as well! Now we just need the qualifiers to make it doubleplus ungood :P

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NicoGiuliani
NicoGiuliani
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My girlfriend and I came to the same conclusion upon seeing the prefix mal. "Is this Newspeak?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NoNameNoFace

Newspeak is suspected to be inspired partially by Esperanto.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheRefep
TheRefep
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So if I'm getting this correct, Ĉu is basically the Esperanto equivalent of Est-ce que?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Camryn-B

That's what I got from it, yes :) Other than the fact that using Ĉu as a stand-alone word is "Really?", it seems to be the same.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tom-Morgan
Tom-Morgan
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I have always, always related it to est-ce in French. It's basically like asking a question phrased as "Is it that the cafe is good or bad?".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShubhamGup411396

I can't believe how easy this language is!!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aeriesan

Ohhhh ok. So is Ĉu required everytime I ask a question?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnCatDubh
AnCatDubh
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Nope, only yes/no ones

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yarjka
yarjka
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This is also the case in Polish (Czy...?) and Ukrainian (Чи...?) and probably several other Slavic languages.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amuzulo
amuzulo
Mod
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Yes, I remember being pleasantly surprised when I learned czy in Polish. I was like, well that's easy! :-D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kiryo
Kiryo
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It was Dr. Zamenhof's source of inspiration :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nunes89
nunes89
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And Turkish (mi...?) :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PALewis88
PALewis88
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Or either/or questions? Like "Is it hot or cold?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Natalia754514
Natalia754514
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From what I understand from other comments, yes, since an either/or question is a closed question.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fridelain
fridelain
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Doubleplusgood

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KiuquTRANG1

it is not wrong any where. it's right

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/masondp

Why does "estas" come after kafo?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnJuanGiovanni

What does Cu really mean? I've been getting different answers from different lessons in Duolingo and from different discussions.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hjulle
Hjulle
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I'm translating "Cxu" to "Is it so that ...?" in my head. It seems to fit most meanings for me. A statement becomes a yes/no-question, a statement containing "or" turns into a (slightly awkward) either-or-question and the phrase alone becomes "Is it so?" which is synonymous to "Really?".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puffdrawer

How would you say "Is the coffee really good or bad?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DarrynTaylor3.14

ĉu estas la kafo vere bona aŭ vere malbona? Or am I wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConorBohannon

Whether the coffee is good or bad? is also a correct translation and is actually a more literal translation than "Is the coffee good or bad?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Julia_Kunis

so putting "cu" (don't have the accent on the c) before a sentence means is? So, Is the coffee good or bad? Hmm... Coool :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dreyes15

It's like an introduction for closed questions. By the way, write it as cxu (with an x right after the accented letter) in case your keyboard doesnt have the ĉ, ĝ, etc.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xinode
xinode
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Wht is there a estas between coffe and good, do i ignore the word in this sentence if so, why?. To me it looks like, is the coffee is good or bad

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sierscarf

I think the "Cxu la" doesn't have as defined of a meaning. Without it, the sentence would read "The coffee is good or bad" and the "Cxu la" turns it into a question instead of an indefinite statement. Someone else correct me if I'm wrong!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Si1vanu5

Ĉu used by itself is translated as 'Really?' or 'Is that so?' When part of a sentence it's usually easier to translate as 'Do/does'. However, as this example shows, there isn't a direct English translation. Ĉu indicates that the questioner is looking for your choice, such as yes/no or good/bad or a/b/c.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ptrknvk
ptrknvk
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Can I say "Is this coffee good or bad?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trent931

i wrote "the coffee is good or bad". it was wrong because of where i placed "is".

Grammatical error or is it that I am looking at how to write it to straight forward?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/csi
csi
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"The coffee is good or bad." is a statement, not a question. Therefore, incorrect.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bossycarl

Why is estas in there? I translated it as, "Is the coffee is good or bad?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mathso2
Mathso2
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The way Esperanto sentence structure works is that to turn something into a question, you just put a "ĉu" on the beginning of the sentence. It doesn't mean "is", it just doesn't really translate to anything, and all it does it changes the sentence. Look at the tips and notes for more information.

Also, when translating it's always good to use plausibility. For example, a sentence with two "is" in the same clause is a bit strange so just assume that it's wrong and see what you could possibly do to fix your translation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbyBarrnNa

ya no entendí alguien expliqueme por que se le pone "ču" al principio

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/musicspaghetti
musicspaghetti
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Malfunction

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eliska516122

To je dobře že jste mi to připomněli

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EduardAlex13
EduardAlex13
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The best thing is that in Esperanto there is no word order so "Ĉu estas la kafo bona aŭ malbona" means the exactly same thing.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/masondp

Good to know, thanks m8

10 months ago
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