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  5. "Ĝi falas kaj dormas."

"Ĝi falas kaj dormas."

Translation:It falls and sleeps.

May 28, 2015

87 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eddysan3

Don't worry guys, the sentence makes sense. It's describing me after I get home from school.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cleridae

Or after I come home from eating at a buffet


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Interrobang3

Whoa, your comment has no votes but has a lingot.

Edit: okay well NOW it has votes


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jendrej

But you are not "it".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/belridetulo

what it is supposed to mean? )))


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stigjohan

Maybe it's a riddle? My guess is "the night", because after night falls, I get a night's sleep ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xneb

Would "Ĝi" be used to refer to animals, and/or can you also use "li" and "ŝi" for animals as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kreuzauge

Jes ĝi is used with either animals or objects, but if you know the gender you of course could use the gender specific pronoun with an animal just as we do in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GXLD.

Does that mean Esperanto has no masculine or feminine?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2674

Esperanto does not have grammatical gender. It does have the ability to make certain words explicitly refer to a male or a female. (Kind of like English.)


[deactivated user]

    And also it was originally suggested to use "ĝi" for a person when their gender is unknown, but many people don't like this practice now.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/proinsias123

    ...and rubs the lotion on its skin.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/farpung

    Maybe peculiar sentences like this are better for learning because we have to imagine a bizarre context, which is inherently more memorable?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zaambeze

    Like English lessons for Brazilians: "the book is on the table" or for Francophones: "Bryan is in the kitchen" :D


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ungewitig_Wiht

    German's "ich schwimme in Milch" has been the sentence that I mock the site's weird lessons with for a while


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ruamac

    Irish Duolingo - 'The pink girls have your crab'.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ungewitig_Wiht

    Can I have that in Irish, I did irish for a little but gave up, off the top of my head it would be "tá do portán ag na cailíní bandearg" or something like that, I'm sure I butchered it though because I don't recall the plural of cailín (and I feel the rest of my Irish has gone similar ways) :þ


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ruamac

    Maith thú! Tá sin ceart! Well done! That's correct! I think you should take it up again! Although 'portan' would be lenited because of 'do' - 'your'. Tá do phortan . . . The Irish Duolingo is obsessed with crabs and pink girls!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ungewitig_Wiht

    Alright I started, attempted to do the placement test, my Irish definitely has been fermenting in the back of my head for a while... haha oh well gotta start somewhere!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ruamac

    Maith thú agus ádh mór ort! Irish Duolingo FB group -https://www.facebook.com/groups/1027044204013606/


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jonathan--

    Closing time at an extraterrestrial bar?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/astropauws

    This sentence seems so weirdly out of place, I don't know when I'd ever use the comparative in English bar speaking of some existential being. Or perhaps a child falling out bed and going back to sleep, ha ha ha.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Novantico

    "A Child Called It"? :P


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrea251

    Who Knows? Maybe Stephen King is going to write a prequel of his famous novel "It" revealing the childhood of a monster. The title could be "It la knabo". :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/astropauws

    Hey, it's not like they're old enough to argue the nuances behind gendered pronouns! >:¬)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
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    • 2674

    I've read that book. What a maddening, heartbreaking story.
    http://www.amazon.com/Child-Called-It-Courage-Survive/dp/1558743669


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dyskos

    And maybe made up.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2002/07/28/magazine/dysfunction-for-dollars.html?pagewanted=1

    There are some very compelling points made in the story. As one can tell, David is quite the exaggerator. It would be a shame if it were true. Though it would be an even bigger shame if it's all a lie, and made in the name of opportunistic greed.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    • 2674

    Interesting. You would think there would be a way to verify his claims, even in broad terms. Like his teachers, or Child Protective Services. There would have to be a record somewhere.

    (But we digress.)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnnyMnemonic85

    Does Falas = lays down ? In English you could say something like "He lays down and sleeps" but the indefinite "it" doesn't make sense unless you're talking about an animal or something similar. Like a robot that "falls down and goes to sleep".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kreuzauge

    Generally in Esperanto you would use the verb kuŝi when talking about lying down or reclining. If you were very tired and dropped suddenly from exhaustion for example you might use fali.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnnyMnemonic85

    okay but does "Ĝi falas kaj dormas." make sense in Esperanto?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kreuzauge

    It is grammatically correct and so makes sense but maybe not much without knowing the context. :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnnyMnemonic85

    But is it not a sentence fragment, or does Esperanto not have sentence fragments?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kreuzauge

    No it is a complete sentence, as neither of the verbs are necessarily transitive. In conversation of course Esperantistoj use fragments all the time! ;)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrmadmonk

    As a band of intrepid adventurers walking through the woods suddenly come upon a monster; it falls and sleeps. They slowly approach not knowing that the monster suffers from narcolepsy.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thaddeus108

    Guys, I found the tabletop gamer!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kreilyn

    OMG!, really close to Spanish!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LimeGreenTeknii

    That's because Esperanto gets a lot of its words and grammar from Latin. So does Spanish and the other Romance Languages.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kiyorezo

    It falls and it sleeps, it cries and it weeps, it is not a sheep, but you dream of it. It it is a chiiiiiiipmuuuunk... a sleeeeepy chiiiiiiiipmuuuunk..... beware of the chiiiiiiipmuuunk.. oohoooooh oooooh!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tracidmartin

    Bob "So when we shoot the lion with the tranquilizer, it falls and sleeps, right?" Pedro "Well Bob, I have never seen a tranquilized lion sleep standing up, so in theory, it would fall, and hopefully sleep."

    This is the only scenario I can think of that "it falls and sleeps" really would be used in. A ridiculous Zoo training movie.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iawesome2--GD

    WHAT FALLS?????? WHAT SLEEPS??????


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LearnerSR

    Duolingo falls and sleeps, in case you didn't know.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/otsogutxi

    Can it be used for "It falls asleep" ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
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    • 2674

    No. "To fall asleep" is an English idiom. As strange as the sentence is, it mean it literally falls ... and it sleeps.

    Besides, in Esperanto, to say something in that format would not have two present tense verbs.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/otsogutxi

    Thanks:) People reply on these sentence discussions really fast!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HannesStef1

    Sounds like some sort of lovecraftian horror (let's just hope it doesn't wake up).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaikaku

    I keep translating falas to "speaks"...

    damn portugese... anybody has the same problem? xd


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YariMsika

    Interesting combination...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChuckWalter

    Why is “it falls and is asleep” incorrect?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

    "Asleep " is "dormanta"

    Wouldn't "It falls and is asleep. " be "Ĝi falas kaj estas dormanta." ?

    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16967/16967-h/16967-h.htm#letterL


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kafi90

    Why it's uncorrect the sentence "It is falling and sleeping"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Colexian

    This sentence isn't very intuitive. It falls and sleeps? Is this the Esperanto way to say something fell asleep?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/soarndt

    According to a comment above, it's not a colloquialism for "falling asleep" or something of that nature. It seems like this sentence is just sort of used to teach.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vityachu

    When would I use this?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrmadmonk

    See my post above.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/byeimgone123

    Rock a-bye baby, in the treetops... ZZZ... when the wind blows... ZZZ... when the bough breaks... down will come baby, cradle and all... ZZZ... wait a moment! where's my baby gone? Arrgh!


    [deactivated user]

      Are all verbs conjugated the same, or is it just in the present?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
      Mod
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      • 2674

      For any given tense, there is only one conjugation.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SirnyaAraV

      My phone didn't have the option for the proper letter, I had used "Gxi" in a previous entry and it allowed it, but this one flagged me for it..


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
      Mod
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      • 2674

      The app is inconsistent about accepting the x-notation, which is a failing on its part. I'm usually told it's a typo, though, not an outright error.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cool101969

      I honestly did horrible on this one...I might want to review this one


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SorenAlder

      WHAT IS "IT?" IS IT THAT CLOWN FROM "IT"? I'M SCARED NOW


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NitaLo1

      So I wrote something then deleted it just as Duolingo started saying it out loud, which created a (kinda creepy) echo.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stephbutler19

      How would you say, " It (like a cat) fell asleep."


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mutienjo

      This reminds me of my cat


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/17maxwellpollack

      Should it be "It falls asleep"?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
      Mod
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      • 2674

      No. "To fall asleep" is an English idiom. As strange as the sentence is, it mean it literally falls ... and it sleeps.

      Besides, in Esperanto, to say something in that format would not have two present tense verbs.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/waldyrious

      Damn, as a Portuguese speaker this one tripped my brain, since in Portuguese "falas" means "(you) speak"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catarina_Pietsch

      Falas for me means speaks. :P All the polyglot people or people who know somethings of a lot of languages sometimes see the same word with a really different meaning. Is frustrating


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      • 2674

      That does trip me up! Thanks to Portuguese, I also immediately think of "speak" when I see "falas". Why Zamenhof decided to borrow from English for that particular word, we may never know.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibuhara

      who is it, and sleeps?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judit-sama

      This is weird... Falas in portuguese is the conjugation of 2nd p.sing. in present of verb "falar" (speak)... But in Esperanto, which is an idiom created by a man and is a mixt among different languajes, I thought it could come from portuguese, but it means "fall". So, which languaje does come from?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
      Mod
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      • 2674

      I would say the Esperanto "fali" comes from the English "to fall".

      I've studied a little bit of Portuguese, so I was also expecting "fali" to mean "to speak".


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rileyh12

      I translated it as 'It falls asleep' ... No?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
      Mod
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      • 2674

      No. "To fall asleep" is an English idiom. As strange as the sentence is, it mean it literally falls ... and it sleeps.

      Besides, in Esperanto, to say something in that format would not have two present tense verbs.

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