"Bonvenon, komencanto!"

Translation:Welcome, beginner!

May 28, 2015

46 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PonyDesu

The best sentence so far! :)

May 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uq.
  • 69

"Welcome, n00b" isn't accepted, I am very disappointed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Siavel

I've taken to calling myself "Novulaĉo", which is the closest I can get to "N00b" in meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/simpy3

Let's just starting adding our own Esperanto slang!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TobyBartels

I reported ‘newbie’. We'll see how that goes!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KennyKivi

Feb 12, 2018 it says it is the correct one


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SergioOQ

"Komencanto" sounds like "comen santo"... that means "they eat a holy man" or "they eat in a holy way" in spanish. I just thought it was funny =)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Flavio_do_Brasil

"Com encanto" in Portuguese means "with charm" or "with delight".

It will be confusing for me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SergioOQ

Well, its almost the same in spanish: "With charm" is "Con encanto".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trielt

Think of "começar".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/m.tastic

Thanks, I'm enjoying my stay quite a lot :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heylucc

I see what you did there, hehe


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PALewis88

Dankon multe! Esperanto estas bona!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZL321

Thanks for the welcoming!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kringlur

I kinda think "welcome, newbie" should also be accepted.... as it's the word we use most often for this kind of thing ; D


[deactivated user]

    Dankon kaj saluton, Duo!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pmton

    Mi amas vin!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bnbnb2

    Esperanto course is most impressing and interesting course ever


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/poppy_with_matt

    i guess "venon" means "come" in esperanto, and bon must mean "good". so welcome is "good come" (which is the same thing as welcome, right?)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phle70

    Basically, yes:

    (from Lernu! (lernu.net))

    • bonveno (bon·ven·o ← ven·i) welcome

      • bona (bon·a) good, okay, nice bone (bon·e ← bon·a)
        well, OK, okay bono (bon·o ← bon·a)
        good

      • veni (ven·i) to come veno (ven·o ← ven·i)
        coming, arrival

    • (-o marks noun)

    • -n (accusative case marker)


    (also: It's possible to (both) Edit (and Delete) comments, (at least) if you use the Desktop interface using a web browser)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/poppy_with_matt

    correct me if im ron


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tomicxo

    I dunno, I think that your comment is a pretty accurate reflection of how the professors in Harry Potter treated Ron…


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wayne.io

    awww hihi giggles


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClaireLaLiberte

    I sense condescension.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ratthew.

    Trying "Welcome, n00b!" as a joke makes me realize that I want an Esperanto word for n00b since n00b comes from English newbie. Plus, komencanto is such a long word. XD


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Siavel

    Well "novulo" would be "new person", but that doesn't quite have the disdain that comes with "n00b". Possibly "novulaĉo" for "terrible new person"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ratthew.

    Dankon! :D I've learned quite a bit more since I posted that, but haven't actually put any thought in to a word like "n00b." I think I like this suggestion.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoJeBo

    Dankon, Duo


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eric_Cline

    I can't tell if the "c" is pronounced "ss" or "ts". Does anyone know the rule?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slug-lord

    'ts' is how all the internet resources describe it. Like the german 'z'.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phle70

    Your question is 7 months old by now, but I'm adding this here in case anyone else has the same question:

    The Tips and notes for the first Esperanto skill, Basics 1 says

    Esperanto c - English equivalent ts (as in pe_ts_)

    There's also a quite good explanation over in English Wikipedia, with descriptions for most of the not-pronounced-similar-as-in-English letters.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaaadz

    why is bonvenon in accusative


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phle70

    I believe it's because it's originally part of a longer phrase.

    From the Tips and notes section for the Esperanto skill Common Phrases:

    Why is it "dankon" and not "danko"?

    When you use an expression like “Thanks” in English you are actually shortening a full statement. As you will soon learn in Esperanto, -n indicates the object of the sentence as you can see in the examples below:

    Dankon = Mi donas al vi dankon.
    Thanks = I give you thanks.
    ("thanks" is the object of the sentence).

    Saluton! = Mi donas al vi saluton.
    Hi!/Hello!/Greetings! = I give you greetings.
    ("greetings" is the object)

    Feliĉan novan jaron! = Mi deziras al vi feliĉan novan jaron!
    Happy new year! = I wish you a happy new year!
    ("happy new year" is the object)

    Someone "ne-komencanto" may be able to fill us in on what the full expression may be ... (my guess: Mi deziras al vi bonvenon! I wish you welcome!)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noah.Sulfridge

    Sounds like the opening sentence to one of my favorite types of... oh nvm.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul565514

    Thanks, I am a beginner myself!

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