"The small woman plays slowly."

Translation:La malgranda virino malrapide ludas.

3 years ago

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/alanxoc3
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It is cool that you just add mal in front of some words to make it their opposite. Easy to remember.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaLowenstein

Yes, that's the beauty of Esperanto!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TylerCarbo
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Reminds me of 1984, newspeach

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kliphph
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crimethink is double plus ungood, the MiniDespair (Ministry of Esperanto) will unperson you and your comments.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TylerCarbo
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Wonderful, I haven't read a comment that has made me laugh quite like that in a long time. Have a Lingot!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Snowjazzy
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Exactly what I've been thinking throughout this whole thing. Scaaary... haha

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RuskiGermans4Eva

Eh, I'd speak new speak if I could...

"The only vocabulary the gets smaller every year."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ungewitig_Wiht

Incidentally that's where Orwell got the idea from.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nudpiedo

Does the order of the words matter? Most if the times I order the sentences as in english or spanish, but this time the suggested answer showed the verb at the end of the sentence.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaLowenstein

Esperanto has very flexible word order. You can say "La malgranda virino ludas malrapide" or "La malgranda virino malrapide ludas", or "Malrapide ludas la virino malgranda" or ....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bakman329
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Could one compound "malgranda virino" into "malgrandvirino", or is this sort of compounding exclusively between adjacent nouns?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaLowenstein

You don't normally make a compound by adding an adjective to a noun, as there is no reason why the adjective shouldn't have its full form. So it is not correct to stick "malgranda" and "virino" together to form a compound. Having said this, there are some compounds formed of an adjective plus a noun, but then the compound has a specific meaning, e.g. "nov-edzino" = bride, as opposed to "nova edzino" = new wife.

If you think "malgranda virino" is too much of a mouthful, you can use the suffix -et- and say "virineto" which means exactly the same as "malgranda virino". The suffix -et- can become an adjective in its own right "eta", so you could also say "eta virino".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bakman329
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Excellent explanation, dankon!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hunterd0721
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Does this verb "to play" (ludi) also mean to play in the sense of instruments? Because when I hear this sentence I imagine a woman playing an instrument slowly.

Or is "to play" (an instrument) a different verb?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chrissphinx

The verb ludas is for both "to play" (an instrument) and "to play" (a game) in Esperanto.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hunterd0721
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Dankon!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcsoton
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Aparently my answer was wrong. I selected both answers for "la malgranda virino ludas malrapide" and " la malgranda virino malrapid ludas". Shurely both of these are correct sentences? if not then can someone explain please how they are wrong? THANKS :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaLowenstein

I see you sent in this question three weeks ago, but no one has ever replied. Both answers are correct, as far as word order is concerned. However in the second answer you've written "malrapid" instead of "malrapide". I assume that's just a typing mistake, but if you wrote that when you were answering the question, it would have been marked wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ruamac
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The same thing happened to me! And, of course, as this is a multiple choice question we're just ticking what's there so can't make any spelling mistakes or typos. This is the question this has happened with.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaLowenstein

I informed the team who are working on the course and asked them to look into this. Today I got this reply: "I checked, and both sentences are starred as preferred translations, so I don't know why the learner didn't get that multiple choice question correct. Let me know please, if anyone sees any similar complaints, and we will contact Duolingo to inquire." So if anyone else has the same problem, please let us know!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zmhunt
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Same happened to me today. Ludas malrapide vs malrapide ludas.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaLowenstein

Thanks for letting us know. I've passed on the information, but it could take a long time before Duolingo acts on it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BelajarEsp

malrapide means slowly or slow?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaLowenstein

"Malrapida" (ending in -a) means "slow", and "malrapide" (ending in -e) means "slowly". But please note than in informal speech English speakers sometimes say "slow" when strictly speaking the word should be "slowly" (like "Put down your gun nice and slow"). This is fine in gangster films, but in Esperanto you can't get away with using an adjective when it should be an adverb.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oxolalpa
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La malgranda virino ludas malrapide is correcti, right?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AryanZaere
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Does this mean that you can make an adverb by using the suffix -e?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaLowenstein

That's exactly how you make an adverb. Adverbs in Esperanto end in -e, adjectives in -a.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeanShorts
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I put ludas before malrapide and it said i was correct--is adverb placement flexible?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaLowenstein

Yes, word order is very flexible. Scroll up - somebody's asked the same question before.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OliverBens1

Could someone remind me when words like granda and rapide end in a or e? I've forgotten how it works.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaLowenstein

Words ending in -a are adjectives, words ending in -e are adverbs. I know people often get confused particularly about adverbs, and in English it sometimes happens that people use an adjective when strictly speaking there should be an adverb. This could obviously lead to confusion when speaking Esperanto, in which the two categories are very clear and distinct. If you need more information about adjectives and adverbs, try these links: http://grammar.yourdictionary.com/parts-of-speech/adjectives/what-is-an-adjective.html and http://grammar.yourdictionary.com/parts-of-speech/adverbs/what-is-an-adverb.html.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OliverBens1

Thank you! :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cnhenthorn

All three answers are marked as incorrect...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Palyne

curious about why 'malrapida' was not right; is slowly not an adjective in this usage? don't adjectives end in A?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaLowenstein

No, it's not an adjective but an adverb, which ends in -e in Esperanto. Adjectives relate to nouns, adverbs relate to verbs. "Slowly" (malrapide) doesn't describe the woman herself, but the way she plays, in other words "malrapide " doesn't relate to the noun "virino", but to the verb "ludas".

1 year ago
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