"Deine Kinder essen."

Translation:Your children are eating.

May 28, 2015

65 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexRttr

So both Ihre and deine mean "your", but former is polite form?

May 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimoneBa

Yes, "Ihre" (capital "I") is the polite PLURAL. "Deine", on the other hand, is the familiar singular.

Confusing at first, I know...

May 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VarHyid

Isn't is also the polite singular? Wouldn't you say "Ihre Kreditkarte is abgelaufen" to one single person politely?

May 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexRttr

have found such useful table

May 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RishabhShaw

What is pl. and pol.

June 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VarHyid

Pl = plural, pol = polite

June 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WelshChad

Very helpful table. Thanks!

June 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neelstark

What about it's?

December 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VarHyid

You mean "its" ("it's" means "it is")? If so, it's actually the same as "his" in German so the sentence: "The child and its toys" would translate to: "Das Kind und sein Spielzeug".

December 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/foki97

they are in fact possessive pronouns not adjective, are they?

January 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elardus

No. One gets both possessive adjectives and possessive pronouns. The table above are indeed possessive adjectives. It does seem to me that Duolingo has it wrong this time....

April 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J-Steven

If your (pl.) is used, wouldn't the plural form "euere" be used each time? When would you use euer?

June 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VarHyid

If the subject is male (your son) or neutral (your child), it's "Euer Sohn" or "Euer Kind", if it's feminine (your daughter) or plural (your children), then it's "Euere Tochter" or "Euere Kinder".

June 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linguaphile_2

Thank for this table, this is awesome and so helpful! The possessive pronouns are finally starting to make some sense.

August 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adelriosantiago

Wow German grammar is soooo structured and logic.

November 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianFWilhem1

sehr gut, danke.

July 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimoneBa

So it is. Sorry I missed that!

May 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexRttr

Thank you for your help

May 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brasil2004
  1. Person Possessivpronomens = mein, meine
  2. Person Possessivpronomens = dein, deine
  3. Person Possessivpronomens = sein, seine oder ihr, ihre =simultaneously polite form
May 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DragosV2

Is there a section in this app where grammar rules are explained in a more formal and comprehensive way ?

January 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pDuoo

Not that I know of. The website has formal lessons before some of the sections.

January 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/b00gster

why is it "diene" and not "euere"? This lesson uses both and I am little confused!

September 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linguaphile_2

Hallo b00gster!

"your" = "dein" (masc.), "deine" (fem.), "dein" (neut.), "deine" (plural)

"your" (plural) = "euer" (masc.), "euere" (fem.), "euer" (neut.), "euere" (plural)

"your" (polite) = "Ihr" (masc.), "Ihre" (fem.), "Ihr" (neut.), "Ihre" (plural); ((notice they're all capitalized, b/c they're addressing someone in a formal manner))

So, it depends on who the 'your' is addressing when saying "Your children eat." (or "Your children are eating.") If addressing someone in an informal manner (a friend, close family member, etc.) = "Dein/Deine Kinder essen." If addressing several 'yours' (talking to both parents/guardians at the same time) = "Euer/Euere Kinder essen." If addressing someone in a formal manner (your parents' friends, authoritative figures, etc.) = "Ihr/Ihre Kinder essen."

This is as I understand it so far. Take a look back, close to the top of this thread, +AlexRttr has posted an excellent chart ('Possessive Adjectives') that has helped me a lot with my Deutsch 'your' questions. (I got all the info. I typed above, from that chart ☺.) Also, scroll down about 20 posts, and check out what +Elardus has to say about the use of your; some helpful info. there as well.

October 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tobiasknz

Why cant i put your child eats

December 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LisaKeane0

because its not singular Child=kind Children=kinder

January 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VarHyid

Because that's singular (one child = ein Kind) and the German sentence is plural (several children = mehrere Kinder).

December 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeepakD5

Was wondering the same

November 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EnBuyukFen1

Can I say thine instead of your?

February 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.Fink

No, the second person singular forms - thou, thee, thy, thine, thyself - are archaic in English, almost never used nowadays, except for quoting old works of literature, sometimes in prayers or hymns addressing a deity (usually the Christian Father-god-aspect or Jesus-aspect), rare appearances in poetry, or for humorous effect (usually by people who do not know the correct archaic usage of the various forms). I understand the Quakers continued to use some of the forms after they fell out of use in the general population; I do not know whether this is still the case in some situations, although I would guess it is not; they use(d) "thee" for both subjects and objects, I believe, and modern third person singular verb endings instead of the traditional second person verb endings - "Thee is reading a book," instead of "Thou art reading a book."

That said, in the old days when "thine" WAS generally used, it still would not have been used in a sentence like this; it would not be used before a noun starting with a consonant like "children", but before nouns beginning with a vowel: "thine uncle" but "thy children". ("thine" was also used in a few other places as a possessive pronoun standing alone, not followed by a noun, as in "That book is thine" or "That is no concern of thine."

February 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EnBuyukFen1

Thanks for the explanation. I feel like english has strayed so much away from its german roots. It has more latin vocab than german.

February 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dexter_dek

Why not euere instead of deine

March 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elardus

Dexter, I suppose it could be but 'euere' would be a different meaning as its would simply refer to 'your (plural)' instead of 'your (singular)'.

April 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thunder_Lighting

Eat your children.

November 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joshuarocks92

Thx for the table

December 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stephen922518

I know its wrong but i read this as. Your children are food.

January 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/l08637

why cant you do You're?

March 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VarHyid

Because "you're" is completely different than "your".

"You're" means "you are" so saying "You're kids are eating" means "You are kids are eating".

"Your" means... well... your, as in:

  • Whose kids are these?
  • These are your kids.
March 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/l08637

Sorry for late reaction but as thanks 20 lingots

March 31, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shimerab

I really have trouble understanding what is being said. Deine Kinder essen actually sounds to me like Deiner Kinde essen. Does anyone else have that problem and will it get better with time?

July 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VarHyid

I'm sure it'll get better with time :) If you're not a native speaker of a language, you won't hear the subtle details in the pronunciation especially if it's being read quite fast, you'll just have to listen to it a lot and eventually you'll easily hear it.

In general, please note that in German "e" is usually pronounced like "uh" if it's at the end of the word so in this sentence you're hearing something like "Deinuh", try to think about it like this and you won't hear an "r" there. As for "Kinder", the "r" is very soft here, almost mute. Germans don't "roll" the "r" (except for some dialects) like Swedes do, for example.

But again, the more you'll listen to it, the faster you'll start noticing the patterns and realize which letters are "silent" and in which cases.

Also, funny fact, you wrote that you hear "essen" while the pronunciation is actually "essn", the second "e" is completely mute so it looks like in this word you've already got used to it and write "essen" while you hear "essn" ;)

July 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shimerab

Thank you. I was getting a little discouraged

July 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linguaphile_2

Thank you for this reply, I liked your explanation of the "uh" sounding suffix for "e" suffixes and not rolling the r's.

August 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linguaphile_2

It will get better with time. Always listen to the sound when doing your lessons, the more exposure you get to the sound of the language the more it will solidify in your brain. Think of young children and how the pick up their native language. It takes time, but children pick up their language by hearing; notice children learn to speak before learning to read and writing comes last. They learn from consistent exposure to hearing people speak the language.

One additional hearing resource, to Duo, that I like to listen to is German radio (in the background while I do other things). You also get to hear other German voices, the voice on Duo is just one voice (and it's a robot) and each voice enunciates a little different. Here's a link to one of the radio stations I like to listen to, Eins Live or 1Live

http://www1.wdr.de/radio/1live/on-air/1live-webradio/index.html

click start at the bottom of the page, expand "Channel, Playlist & Themen" to browse the programs, it's a great station. You could also try watching German shows or movies, if you can find them. Watch German videos on youtube as well. Expose yourself to the sound as much as you can. Good luck to you, and have some fun.

Oh, and if you're not yet, make vocab flash cards. They don't make sound, but you can while you're reading them.

August 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shimerab

Danke. I always appreciate other places to go to in order to try to improve these skills. I also print out the word list of the ones I should know and go through them.

August 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.Fink

When Duo speaks a sentence, I always repeat it back 3 times before going on.

October 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SydneyJaco3

children and kids are the same thing

January 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emily-CB

Could this also be written as "Deine Kinder sind essen" or does it just depend on the context? Danke!

January 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elardus

No Emily. German does not use continuous tense as in English. 'Kinder essen' can mean both 'children eat' and 'children are eating'.

April 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.Fink

No. No "sind" Your children are eating" or "Your children do eat" or "Your children eat" are all "Deine Kinder essen." The "are" in "are eating" is not translated, nor is the"do".

April 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linguaphile_2

From what I've come to understand, I believe it is;

"Deine Kinder essen." = Your children eat.

"Ihre Kinder essen." = Your children ARE eating.

March 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.Fink

deine Kinder - Your (one person) children Ihre Kinder - Your (formal, one person or several) children ihre Kinder - [no capital unless it's the first word in the sentence] her children or their children

Suggest you google something like "German possessive adjectives" - you can probably find a convenient chart of the various forms.

April 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elardus

No kurosan. 'Ihre Kinder essen' could mean both 'your children eat' and 'your children are eating'.

April 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linguaphile_2

Thank you for the clarification. I am not a native German speaker, and I'm just trying to put all the puzzle pieces together. Do you have any tips on how to know when to say "DEINE Kinder essen," or when to say, "IHRE Kinder essen,"? Thanks, much appreciated!

April 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elardus

Yes, it's very simple. Decide who you are addressing; you (singular) or you (plural)? The first (du) needs 'deine', the second (ihr) needs 'ihre'. (Note that 'ihre' could also mean 'her' if you wanted to say 'her kids eat' instead of 'your (plural) kids eat').

April 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linguaphile_2

Thank you very much for explaining this further, the use of "your" is a lot more clear now! ☺

April 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emily-CB

Thanks! For some reason I completely forgot about "Ihre".

April 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AhmadBasee

Ich verstehen. danke,schon.

October 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lenyjowo123

yo bro

September 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lenyjowo123

svenska äger swedish is best

September 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karnnan

Why is 'your kids are eating' wrong? What's the difference between that and 'your children are eating' ?

March 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoorPliers

This audio wasn't working with me

April 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertHJMa

'Your children's food' should be accepted, surely?

May 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jobert1117

My answer is letter-for-letter the same as the correct answer, yet it was marked incorrect.

May 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JulianElMagno

So I got it wrong because I answered "your children eat." Is that incorrect?

June 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KyriakiZac

why not your children eat?

August 11, 2019
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