"La tagoj estas tre longaj, ĉu ne?"

Translation:The days are very long, aren't they?

May 28, 2015

30 Comments

Sorted by top post

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luizjoaquim

The expression "eh?" should be accepted, I guess.

May 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Interrobang3

Canadian detected

June 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kholden83

We do that in Australian English too, it's just not a stereotype like it is for Canadians.

June 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaCa826187

I think Cockneys do something similar but I think it's more like Hey with the H dropped.

July 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheAwkwardBrit

Lol I'm from South London and I can confirm that you're pretty much spot on. E.g. "What d'ya think about that girl then 'ay?"

February 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaCa826187

Good to have it confirmed, cheers.

February 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iheartbieber

You deserve a lingot

August 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UneJamKuqEZi

Can't you say, right?, at the end?

The days are very long, right?

May 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/C.S.S_TRADIV

Yes, but I don't think duolingo would accept it.

January 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimmyL7

It did for me atleast.

March 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eramaeni

Why is "The days are very long, no?" considered incorrect English? Is that a colloquialism?

January 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emmett705338

Does anyone else get tripped up by having just ONE word for 'the'. Like, English is my native language, so it SHOULDN'T be weird haha, but at the same time, most other European languages have more than one, and so it feels weird saying 'la tagoj' - because French is my second language, I keep thinking to say 'les tagoj' grrrrrr

October 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2066

I agree. I don't understand what makes "la" special with regard to agreement.

June 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bartimaus

Actually, having multiple words that mean the same but can't be used interchangeably is a MAJOR struggle for me. Not saying good or bad, but I find it interesting that we struggle with different sides of the same concept.

July 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OOO00OOOi

why is "the days are very long, no?" wrong?

April 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/goodjohnjr

I have the same question.

-John Jr

February 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2066

Because the course contributors haven't added that in yet. Next time it comes up, flag it and say "My answer should be accepted".

February 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/goodjohnjr

I forgot about that option, thank you for reminding me Rae.F.

-John Jr

February 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Langrusse

The days are very long, are not they? (aren't they?)

May 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2066

"are they not?", not "are not they?"

June 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaurentRam2

Tagoj was not part of the 3 offered responses

February 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yohanes517943

I thought it should be arn't they instead of are they not

March 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AntonR1

Don't know what 'tago' was wrong.. It would have been a different meaning, but not an invalid sentence.

September 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AntonR1

*why

September 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2066

"longaj" needs to agree with "tagoj". It sounds like you needed to fill in the blank?

June 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sethdj

Maybe I'm just not good with grammar, but why is it tagoj and nor tagojn? Arent the days the object of the sentence?

December 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2066

No, there is no object here.

"tagoj" is the subject and "longaj" is the subject complement. "esti" is a stative verb, not active, so it can't be transitive. Only a transitive verb can have a direct object.

June 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nocx14

"The days are very long, No?" and "The days are very long, am I right?" Aren't accepted?

December 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bartimaus

Sometimes people don't understand when I'm asking a question, so I'm making it clear, I am asking a question so I can try to better understand.

How does "ne/no" become "aren't they"? I'm not really sure how to word it, which I find ironic in this case, but how do you hear "no" and just pull "aren't they" out of your head? I assume there is a rule for this and I'm just not aware or I'm misunderstanding it perhaps, but it really does confuse me.

July 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2066

In English, we form tag questions by taking the subject pronoun and the auxiliary verb, negating it if it's positive and making it positive if it's negative.

Molly is going, isn't she?
Tom's not doing that, is he?
We aren't leaving now, are we?
You are finished, aren't you?
It does seem to be that way, doesn't it?

In Esperanto (which I believe took it from Polish), the tag question is formed by either "ĉu?" or "ĉu ne?", which can be translated as "is that so?" and "is that not so?" respectively.

July 17, 2019
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