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  5. "La angla estas lingvo."

"La angla estas lingvo."

Translation:English is a language.

May 28, 2015

59 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/no.name.42

Wait, "La Angla" is short for "La Angla Lingvo," so didn't I just say "The English language is a language"?

May 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoeJScott

taŭtologio estas taŭtologio

May 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kreilyn

Acording to me, you can say ''the English is a language!'' in English as well!

May 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/no.name.42

Well you can say it, that doesn't mean it makes any sense to say it. Mostly I wanted to make sure I understood the redundancy of what was being said in Esperanto.

May 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kbalara

If you say ANGLA without LA, it means "a english (thing)" 'cause ANGLA is an adjective. In Eo you say LA ANGLA to mean something like "the English thing", which by context sould be understood like "English language"

LA ANGLA could mean any specificEnglish thing according to context. If I am talking about teas I could say: LA ANGLA ESTAS BONGUSTA.

August 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kbalara

"The English (tea) is delicious."

August 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

I think what they are pointing out is that the word "language" could be implied in English as well. After all, "-ish" is an adjectival ending. Similarly, you could say "Siamese are cats" or "Siamese cats are cats," if someone had been talking about a Siamese as a kind of dog.

June 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paucaste1970

"Prairie dogs are not dogs"

October 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

And prairies are most definitely not dogs.

January 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

In English we do not use the definite article there. We could say "English is a language." or "The English language is a language.". according to more than just me. http://grammar.about.com/od/e/g/englishlanguageterm.htm

June 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/v.ivanov

Consider it part of a possible discussion "Is English a regular language or a creole?" — "(Tamen) la angla estas lingvo" may be part of such conversation :)

August 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Novantico

Why is there "la" before the name of a language? The English, the Spanish...I don't really get it.

May 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elorac72

It's in the notes and tips for this skill - it's short for la angla lingvo. Angla on its own would be an adjective.

I suppose it would be too ambiguous to drop 'la' as well as 'lingvo'.

May 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uq.
  • 67

at least there's a good reason for it

February 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GalacticKe

If the 'la' is dropped, then it becomes an indeterminate phrase: 'an English thing'. We're talking about English, though, which is definite, so we call it 'the English thing', which is implied to be the language.

June 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiamBeans

For one thing, "la angla" is short for "la angla lingvo."

Also, it might have something to do with the fact that Esperanto likes to pull vocabulary from Romance languages. I'm not sure if German does this, but in French you'll sometimes see the definite article appear when you're talking about general nouns. For example, I've seen "English is an easy language" translated as both "L'anglais est une langue facile" and "Anglais est une langue facile."

May 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Latcarf

"Anglas est une langue facile" is not correct French, you need the article. You do not need it when you want to say "Je parle anglais" but I think it’s the only exception.

May 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiamBeans

Dankon! I knew there was an instance where the French indefinite article could be omitted, but I wasn't sure where it was.

May 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thraxnik

It happens a lot in Spanish, too, also with general nouns (often for ideas and concepts).

July 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paucaste1970

Yes, same for Spanish :-)

October 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Latcarf

The question is rather why is there no "the" before the name of a language in English? The Esperanto way makes more sense to me.

June 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IoannesServus

Using "la" and an adjective without a noun is like saying, in this case, "the English one". We know we're talking about a language, so... Bro, if you don't get it, it's 'cause English. You've got to open your mind to a whole new way of expression. Easier said than done, I know. Call me a jerk, but I was raised bilingual, so yes, I admit I have some advantage... Just remember that not everything is a calque on English. ;)

May 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paucaste1970

We do the same in Spanish: "El inglés es una lengua". I wonder if it's the same for other latin languages....

October 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KyledelPue

English is a language lacking the consistency and regularity of Esperanto. English is a language of too many exceptions.

June 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/reborrn

From reading the comments I understand the reason for the "La" in front.

What if you change angla to a noun ==> anglo and say "Anglo estas lingvo." Or does this change to English as in the group of people?

June 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kbalara

ANGLO means Englishman. So ANGLO ESTAS LINGVO is wrong. ANGLO ESTAS HOMO. :D

August 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IamJustintime

So if I'm not mistaken, proper nouns are never capitalised in Esperanto. I should only capitalise a word if it starts a sentence.

July 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Novantico

I believe proper nouns like a person's name or a city can be capitalized, but other things aren't. There's a discussion about it here: https://lernu.net/fr/forumo/temo/5542

July 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IamJustintime

Dankon! :D That was very helpful.

July 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Novantico

Great to hear :)

July 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tomaszym

Well kind of yeah. :D But that would make sence if someone eg. understood Langla to be a name or smth. :-)

May 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/imtonie

will it be correct if you said The English is a language?

June 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Majklo_Blic

In English, "The English" refers to the people of England as a whole, never to the language itself. Confusing, I know.

June 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Novantico

That's pretty much what tripped me up.

June 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Latcarf

No, in English you can’t say "the English", it’s just "English"

June 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GiladTi

shouldn't that be "lingvon"? after all, it's an object...

June 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Novantico

Not in this case. The accusative is not needed after "estas"

June 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GiladTi

ahhh thanks._.

June 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2068

"to be" is a stative verb. It takes a subject complement, but not a direct object. The -n suffix is for direct objects, which only happen with transitive active verbs.

September 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ookamishi

Why ???? There is "la" before angla so it's the English language and not English (alone)

December 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2068

Different languages have different rules. English was not one of the languages Zamenhof spoke. The rules of Esperanto say that the full phrase is "la L lingvo" but can be shortened to "la L". The rules of English say that we only say "L".

(Where L stands for whatever language we're talking about.)

December 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ookamishi

Sorry but I don't understand what you mean! My wrong answer was in English not in Esperanto. I wrote "The English is a language" instead of the right answer "English is a language" and my question was about the article "the". Sorry if my first question wasn't clear.

December 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2068

Yes, I answered that question. In English, we do not say "the English" (or "the French" or "the German") when speaking about the language. We simply say "English" (or "French" or "German").

December 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Koutk18

Why is it "la angla" and not "l'angla"? In French, if 2 vowels are together you replace with an apostrophe. Does anyone know why this does not happen in Esperanto?

September 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/theFIZZYnator

Because we aren't lazy like those French speakers.

October 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MosesPeris

Not very fond of English language.

November 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bore_ito

If "Angla" would be an adjective by itself if you left out "la", then why can't you just add an O to the end, making it Anglo. Wouldn't it be more redundant to say: "La angla estas lingvo" (The english language is a language) rather than: "Anglo estas lingvo" (English is a language)? Or would I be saying "A English is a language"?

May 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2068

"La angla" is idiomatically short for "la angla lingvo". "Angla" is an adjective. "Angla manĝaĵo" is "English food", "angla muziko" is "English music", etc.

"Anglo" is a noun and means specifically "Englishman" (or more broadly, a person from England, just as "franco" means "Frenchman" (or more broadly, a person from France). So saying "Anglo estas lingvo" would mean "An Englishperson is a language".

May 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shep588827

when is it anglan vs angla

January 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

The -n ending is for the object of the verb. Here it is the subject.

January 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hakaboy8

Why doesn't 'lingvo' become 'lingvon' if it comes after a verb? I thought that'd be an indicator for it being accusative

January 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2068

The accusative is for the direct object of a transitive verb. For example:

La knabino ĵetis la pilkon.

ĵetis is a transitive verb because it performs an action on a thing. la pilkon is the thing that received the action of the verb.

If you can ask yourself "What got thrown?" -- indeed, if you can re-work it into the passive voice -- then you're dealing with a transitive verb and its direct object.

esti is not a transitive verb. It's not an intransitive verb, either. Transitivity only applies to active verbs, and esti is part of a class of verbs called stative verbs. They describe the state of something. Anything that comes after a stative verb is called a subject complement. It reflects back on the subject of the sentence.

John looks tired. "tired" describes how John looks (appears).
The coffee smells wonderful. "wonderful" describes how the coffee smells (the aroma it gives off).
La angla estas lingvo. "lingvo" specifies "la angla".

January 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

In most languages, this use of the verb "to be" is called a copula. The word that comes after it is not really an object, like a word coming after "to send" or "to hit" would be. Rather, it's usually in the subject form, because the "to be" is really more like an equal sign, so "la angla = lingvo," in a way, and both words are consequently in the same case (grammatical form of the noun).

January 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RachelElia6

Talk about "dammed by faint praise." Esperanto is easy, French is beautiful and German is not ugly. But all Duolingo has to say about English is 'its a language."

April 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pinkfungi

damn it i said the english is a language and it was marked incorrect

November 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2068

In English, we only say "the English" when referring to English people. "The English are interested in the royal family".

We'll say "the English language", which is what "la angla" is short for (notice how it ends in -a), but just "English" for short.

November 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M.T.4

I'm thinking this is some sort of the "the + adjective" structure in English which can also used for plural nouns like "the English (people)". Can La angla sometimes mean that depending on the context?

July 30, 2019
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