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"Ĉapeloj mojosas!"

Translation:Hats are cool!

May 28, 2015

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crispycraker

Are they as cool as bowties?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tomaszym

They are so cool that the font used by duolingo get nervous when trying to render them and this affects look of a whole letter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaizinM

Bantkravatoj mojosas!

Bow = banto

(Neck)tie = kravato


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/otakufreak40

"Fezoj mojosas."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zaukaj

If you think hats are cool, check out TF2.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/traevoli

Dankon! Mi konsentas ke mia filmo "Ĉapeloj" mojosas:

https://youtu.be/z-LeLbjOYE4

Thanks! I think my film "Ĉapeloj" is pretty cool, too!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/desivy38

Can you make any noun a verb? Like to be a boy? Knabas?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohannesP3us

as long as it means anything, then yes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mastersword83

Apparently "Krokodili" means "to speak your native language where Esperanto would be more appropriate" so yes


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fajro

And "aligatori" means paroli another language (not your native one) where Esperanto would be more appropriate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

But "krododili" is idomatic. It ultimately has nothing to do with "krokodiloj" in the conventional sense. However, see my other comments in this thread. You can turn a noun into a verb if the noun has an associated action.

If we understand krokodiloj to be people who speak a national language when Esperanto is more appropriate, then krokodili means simply "to do the thing that krokodiloj are known to do.

This doesn't work with knabo because there isn't just one thing that boys are known or defined as doing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

No.

A verb generally means "to do the action associated with the root." For this to work, the root has to have an action associated with it.

  • martelo (hammer) - marteli (to hammer)

"Mojosa" is a special case. It's a recently coined word designed to be extra slangy, so you can say "mojosas" as in "to give off coolness." I do not recommend overgeneralizing this "rule."

For example - rapida (fast) - rapidi (to hurry) - kuraĝa (brave) - kuraĝi (to demonstrate courage.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/draquila

Basically, yes. Roots technically have no part of speech.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/traevoli

Actually, roots are sometimes used by themselves as expletives. "Fek!" for example.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/draquila

But that does not make the root an interjection. It's just a root.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brandmari

No, not all hats are cool. Fezzes are cool.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/texas2pugs

Does anyone know where mojosa comes from?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Claudia581500

M J S.... Mo Jo Sa. Estas la komencajn literojn de Moderneco, Juneco kaj Stileco. ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Majklo_Blic

Mojosa fabelo, fraĉjo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rafaelnelvam

Is "mojosi" a verb then?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/esperisto

"mojosi" ends with "-i". it is a verb. The part of speech can be transformed. But, roots have their intrinsic (or inherent?) part of speech. For example, pork-, is a noun root. ir- is a verb root. ven- is a verb root. But they can be transformed to other parts of speech, say, porka, iro, and veno.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NailahM93

Kept forgetting the word for cool ; just realized I can think of it like cool = has mojo = mojosas :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/taketeisqueen

So can mojosas be used in this context as well as temperature context, like in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/traevoli

No. For temperature you would use (mal)varm(eg)a.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Klaus_nthr

ĉapeloj estas mojosas homo

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