"Lakto estas blanka kaj ĉokolado estas bruna."

Translation:Milk is white and chocolate is brown.

3 years ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/TuLaim
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Milk is white, chocolate is brown, this Duolingo course never lets me down.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
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Chocolate is brown. Milk is white. Why can't I get all the answers right?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZL321
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What about chocolate milk and white chocolate? :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pokachu
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Chocolate milk - Ĉokolada lakto; White chocolate - blanka ĉokolado.

Ĉokolada lakto estas bruna kaj blanka ĉokolado estas blanka.

I believe this to be true according to what I have learned thus far.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-Zorua-
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White chocolate isn't really chocolate, since it only contains cocoa butter.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Skapata
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Same as milk chocolate, since it doesn't contain enough cocoa.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rippler
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Seriously? I've been living a lie.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Niconico455

I have a question, why after estas it doesn't go with -n? (sorry for my bad english)

3 years ago

[deactivated user]

    Nouns and adjectives after "estas" never take the accusative ending.

    Li estas knabo.

    Lakto estas blanka.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Rippler
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    In case anyone's wondering, the official terms are predicate nominatives (for nouns) and predicate adjectives.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/HannesStef1

    I like my chocolate black.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/lyubomirv
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    So in Esperanto you don't need 'La' in front of 'lakta' and 'ĉokolado' in this case?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/alfredo-martin
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    I wonder the same. Since I'm a Spanish speaker, we generally put definited articles (él, la) before nouns when we talk about general things, like "La leche" to reffer any milk in the world o "El chocolate" to describe any chocolate in the world. But since the point of view of an English native these words don't need articles, unless you are describing a specific milk or chocolate. I guess the logic would be the same in Esperanto, but maybe I'm wrong.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/lyubomirv
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    Exactly what I want to know. My native language is Bulgarian an we also 'define' the general things (we don't have definite articles but we have an equivalent thing). So is Esperanto more like English in this case? Or is the sentence wrong? Can any advanced speaker answer?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Eversome

    I believe it works similar to the English language. "La" refers to something specific or known. When it is omitted, the noun is presumed to be general or indefinite, depending on context.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
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    It's essentially optional. See my answer here.

    https://www.duolingo.com/comment/9026466

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/elijahmartincek

    Does Esperanto not need a comma to separate two independent clauses?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Beaver_Bruh

    You learn something new everyday :P

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/GuniadaMaxima

    I have a question, could you say "lakto estas blanka kaj ĉokolado bruna"? Or is it necessary to write the verb in both sentences?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/KaptianKaos8
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    This is how cooks address the "Roses are red, violets are blue," but either way I don't know what more obvious.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Josenaldo..

    I have a cousin named Bruna; it'd be funny if I asked her "Kio estas via nomo"

    2 months ago
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