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"Miaj propraj ŝtrumpetoj estas blankaj."

Translation:My own socks are white.

May 29, 2015

59 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YairGuri

My own socks are white. My stolen ones, however, come in a variety of colours...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yanior

this is some kind of tongue twister lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YariMsika

Why is the esperanto comments section so distracting!!! XD


[deactivated user]

    Because we have fun


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vitor.lu

    You must be German then :P


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RomajiAmulo

    ... Americans wear lots of white socks


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/draquila

    Do non-German Europeans not wear white socks? In America, most men wear white socks in casual situations and black socks to weddings, funerals, etc. Colored socks are easy to find but mostly worn by women.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vitor.lu

    It's an European joke that you can recognize the German tourists by their white socks visible through their sandals... I believe in most of the rest of the continent white socks are something only possible to use in some sports, never as a normal piece of clothing, even less with sandals :P

    But hey, stereotypes are never a good guide.. ;)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lane24

    Interesting- socks with sandals, often times white sweat socks, is also an Pacific Northwest regional thing in the US. So, there's always the off-chance the tourists could be American. lol


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristiaHall

    I was just going to say that Americans in the Pacific Northwest seem to do this a lot also, ha ha.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dirosissaias

    In Greece there is a jock about German tourists wearing socks with sandals. Normally we wear them without socks (because the point of sandals is to keep your feet cool in summer)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Philo-Phin

    I thought the point of sandals was to show off your pedicure. ;-P


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hirtiganto

    Or Polish if they are combined with sandals


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnKing147785

    In this case, why would you say "miaj propraj" when you can just say "miaj"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    • 2670

    It's the same as the Engish "my" vs "my own".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnKing147785

    I know it just seems like adding "own" is redundant in this case when "my" is all you need.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    • 2670

    It's not at all redundant. It's emphatic.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dnepropedrovsk

    "propraj ŝtrumpetoj" feels funny in the mouth when you say it


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laffesta

    And my borrowed ones are black!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BruceWegne

    En unsono multaj homoj portas blankaj sxtrumpetoj. Miaj propraj sxtrumpetoj estas blankaj. En la hejmo mi ofte portas sandaloj kun blankaj sxtrumpetoj. En la vintro mi ofte portas sandaloj kun verda lana sxtrumpetoj, cxar gxi estas pli varma.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BruceWegne

    Mi ne povis sxangxi " verda lana sxtrumpetoj". Gxi devus legi "verdaj lanaj sxtrumpetoj".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tacit-blue

    there's probably a better place to ask this (although I don't know what that place would be) but does anybody have tips on pronouncing ŝtrumpeto? its already super hard to do a rolled r when it comes after a t, but for some reason having it proceeded by a ŝt makes it seem practically impossible


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adrian729689

    If you can say 'mushroom' you should be able to put in a 'T'.

    'mushtroom'.

    Then drop the 'mu' and tell it to your North English girlfriend.

    'shtroom,pet...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/masukomi

    the speaker doesn't roll the r and I don't see a reason why you would be expected to. It sounds kind-of like it though because you're going from the middle of your tongue against the roof of your palate, forcing it away with an air burst then hitting the tip of your tongue against the front of the palate. It isn't actually multiple hits at the front.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AANickFan

    Where does "propraj" come from?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dirosissaias

    I guess from latin propius or french propre with the same meaning


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/desifromitaly

    Or from Italian "proprio" (sing. fem. "propria", pl. masc. "propri", pl. fem. "proprie").


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    • 2670

    Given the meaning of "one's own", I would say it comes from Italian.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/desifromitaly

    "Propraj" sounds like the Italian "proprio", it's true. But in Italian we don't say "Le mie proprie calze sono bianche", just "le mie calze sono bianche" ("my socks are white" and not "my own socks are white").


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    • 2670

    I wouldn't expect Zamenhof to put the word to the exact same usage as in Italian.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidWolff17

    English "proprietor", "proprietary."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/desifromitaly

    "Ŝtrumpo" is so similar to the Swedish word "strumpa" (that means "stocking, sock")! :-)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mansour.mahmoudi

    in what language there is like this word "ŝtrumpetoj" ? :-D:-D:-D:-D:-D


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AANickFan

    I don't know, but in Swedish we say "strumpa" (singular) "strumpor" (plural).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mansour.mahmoudi

    Tack! Det var intressant!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wilfred_Ivanhoe

    Why use miaj, not mia? Pardonu, mi estas komencanto


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    • 2670

    Possessives are just like any other adjective and must agree with the noun it accompanies.

    The noun is "ŝtrumpetoj", which is plural and non-accusative. Therefore "miaj", "propraj", and "blankaj" must all agree.

    If the noun were "ŝtrumpeto", which is singular and non-accusative, it would be "mia", "propra", and "blanka".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sanguine_Dreamer

    While I can see cases for the use of "my own" the own part often seems redundant and is not always used in English. Is this the case in Esperanto too?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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    • 2670

    It's emphatic, not redundant.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Friesk

    How did you know?!


    [deactivated user]

      ŝtrumpetoj looks like Schtroumpfs in French ^^


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GarrettMonie

      go rugxa sxtrumpetoj


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      • 2670

      rugxaj sxtrumpetoj


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ftay98

      Why can't I see the new words


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristiaHall

      I was doing good until this sentence happened. Somehow all the "j"'s are just overwhelming me.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristiaHall

      I hate this sentence. Ha ha.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bartimaus

      It's one of my bigger obstacles to esperanto.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      • 2670

      It's just how the plural is marked.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bartimaus

      No one is complaining about using j instead of s to make A thing plural, it is making non-plural things plural that is the hindrance. "Mys owns socks are whites." No amount of practice is ever going to make me guess correctly every time.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      • 2670

      There is no need to guess. Esperanto, like many European languages, has number and case agreement. If the noun is plural, its associated adjectives (except for "la") must also be marked plural. If the noun is accusative, its associated adjectives (except for "la") must also be marked accusative. It's a regular rule, no guesswork involved.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidWolff17

      English has rules similar to this too, except they tend to change the verb (and not regularly). Why do we change "He is reading" to "They are reading"? The verb changes because the subject has changed from singular to plural. Esperanto changes the noun and its adjectives.

      You'll get used to it with practice.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      • 2670

      This discussion is not about verb conjugation, it is a matter of making nouns (and adjectives) plural.

      cat --> cats
      kato --> katoj


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidWolff17

      Correct. I'm just saying that English has pluralization rules too, that may not obviously make sense but that English speakers are familiar with. So if Esperanto pluralization seems difficult at first, it's not so different from something that you've already successfully learned.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      • 2670

      Verbs and nouns are different matters. Verbs are not plural per se, they simply conjugate according to the subject. This thread was kicked off by someone complaining about all the J's. That's pluralization of nouns and adjectives. Verbs don't enter into it, especially since Esperanto only has one verb conjugation per tense/mood.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidWolff17

      Rae.F, you're missing my point. I'm not saying that verbs (in Esperanto) have anything to do with this.

      I am trying to point out that English, which the original poster is presumably familiar with, has rules about changing words due to plurals. In English it's verbs; in Esperanto it's the nouns and adjectives.

      If the original poster has survived the way that English does it, then he/she can be successful with a sort-of-similar set of rules in Esperanto.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      • 2670

      No, I get your point. I just think it's irrelevant and wrong. For one, English absolutely pluralizes nouns, as I illustrated with cat vs cats. For another, once again, verb conjugation is not quite the same thing as noun pluralization.

      And Esperanto is far more regular than English or any other natural language. Sure we have cat vs cats, but we also have foot vs feet and child vs children.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidWolff17

      Rae.F, I deeply apologize for expressing myself so badly that you can't see what I am trying to say. Please feel free to contact me privately if you wish to continue this discussion.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      • 2670

      Dude. I understand what you're trying to say. I disagree with it.

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