"You cannot eat money."

Translation:Vi ne povas manĝi monon.

3 years ago

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/thraenthraen
thraenthraen
  • 18
  • 14
  • 13
  • 10
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3

For those trying to lose weight, I wouldn't advise eating money. You might gain a few pounds (£).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Novantico
Novantico
  • 12
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3

ayy lmao

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vincemat
vincemat
  • 17
  • 15
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 7
  • 1012

That is one "sterling" joke!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aliarslan3019
aliarslan3019
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

In Turkish, eating money is an idiom. It means spending money.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pratyush.
Pratyush.
  • 16
  • 12
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 3
  • 2

It's similar in Hindi. 'Eating money' means to spend money foolishly without thinking in most useless ways.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baloug
Baloug
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 2

In French it's "claquer" ("to slam (a door)") or "flamber" ("to flame"). I guess there's still the idea of sudden disappearance in all of these terms...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/upstean
upstean
  • 13
  • 12
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7

i thought the same thing for rest of the world. but it isn't ? just special for us ? :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aliarslan3019
aliarslan3019
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

Well, I couldn't say. I have never heard the same expressin in any other languages I have studied.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChristianofPeace

I've never heard just "eating money", but I have seen sentences like "He is eating trough all of his money."

Maybe this is how you guys say it in Turkish too? I don't know. I'm a native English speaker with no knowledge of Turkish...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aliarslan3019
aliarslan3019
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

We literally say "to eat money" like "to eat an apple"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HerrArbo
HerrArbo
  • 20
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 3
  • 2

Something that "eats money" in English is expensive to use or run. i.e. "My hobbies eat money."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m.tastic
m.tastic
  • 25
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 2

True story: You can eat money, I tried it once. All I got was some major indigestion.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/knifey

I experienced rapid inflation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/astropauws
astropauws
  • 15
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 7
  • 3
  • 2

I hope it was a note and not a coin!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pripensi
pripensi
  • 11
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 3
  • 2

Is that a challenge?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Smalde
Smalde
  • 13
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4

Tell my goat she can't

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zaukaj

Not with that attitude!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Balaur
Balaur
  • 25
  • 22
  • 17
  • 17
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 66

For those curious, "Oni ne povas manĝi monon" was accepted. In my opinion, this is a more idiomatic translation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kiki_Michaels

I can't say just "Vi ne manĝas money."?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Novantico
Novantico
  • 12
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3

That would mean "you are not eating money" rather than you can't.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grey236
grey236
  • 14
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5

mangxas means "am/are/is eating" so mangxi is better usage and is the dictionary form

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 18
  • 16
  • 16
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3

if used with "povas".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hirtiganto
hirtiganto
  • 12
  • 11
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6

The question isn't who will let me but who will stop me

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RogelioMV
RogelioMV
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 6

Can someone explain why "Vi povas NE manĝi monon" is incorrect? Why the negation has to go before the verb but not after ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ViaUrsoTrinkas

Vi ne povas manĝi = You are unableble to eat Vi povas ne manĝi = You are able to not eat

You're thinking of "can not" in the English sense. It makes more sense thinking of it like being able or unable to do something.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VenerableScholar

Yeah, I encountered this a lot in Latin, too, though then it was with adjectives and nouns. In fact, I think it would be preferable to avoid putting a negative between two verbs at all, because that could create confusion, since you CAN put a negative AFTER the verb. So...

Vi ne povas mangxi. = You are unable to eat. Vi povas mangxi ne. = You are able to not eat. Vi povas ne mangxi. AVOID

Then again, I could be entirely wrong, but this has been my experience.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fantomius
Fantomius
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 1196

This reminds me of a silly joke:

"All stamps are food stamps if you eat stamps."

(Author unknown)

2 years ago
Learn Esperanto in just 5 minutes a day. For free.