"In Poland, Poles speak Polish."

Translation:En Pollando, poloj parolas la polan.

3 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/m.tastic
m.tastic
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With all the p's and l's, this seems like a tongue twister.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m.tastic
m.tastic
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Cool :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JackyDW
JackyDW
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Wait, so you can write a country's name three ways? Polio, Polujo, and Pollando? Does that apply to other countries like France, which I guess would be Francio, Francujo, and Franclando?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Flipox

Ah... This is "pol-land-o" ! I didn't understood it that whay. So it makes sense, thank you. Is this valid to write "Polio" or "Polujo" for Duolingo?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Flipox

I confirm, "En Polio, poloj parolas la polan" has been accepted.

So why this course prefer to use "-lando" insted of "-io" only for poland and not for other countries ?

And why refuse (for exemple) the use of "germanlando" ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshLingo1800

I believe, it is because some country names can use all three forms: ujo, io, and lando and some names can only use two forms: io and ujo.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NicolasDaL698501

Ugh, so how are we supposed to know which accepts all forms and which don't? It seems to make things unnecessarily more complicated, which defeats one of the purposes of Esperanto (making things easy to learn).

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elensefar

I found a nice answer there: https://esperanto.stackexchange.com/questions/219/why-are-country-names-in-esperanto-so-irregular

"Finally, what about country names ending in "-lando"? In some cases, like "Nederlando" and "Irlando", "land" is just part of the word root, and I don't see anything problematic with that. But there are also some country names, like "Pollando" and "Tajlando", where the word root "land/" is used after a demonym instead of "-uj-". This usage is indeed an irregularity. But note that there are only five countries for which it is very common to use "land/" instead of "-uj-", and only three or four other countries for which this is done by some speakers. It is always right to use the regular "-uj-" (or "-i-") instead of "land/" for these countries (i.e. to use "Polujo", "Tajujo", "Finnujo", "Skotujo" and "Svaziujo"). I personally actually only use these regular forms."

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tracy906994

Why is there a double L in "Pollando"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshLingo1800

Because it is Pol-Lando. Pol from polo or Pole and lando meaning country. Hope that clears it up :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tracy906994

Got it! Thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BioJess

Awesome tongue twister.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_Bon_
_Bon_
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Kial En Pollando, poloj parolas pole ne estas akceptita?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshLingo1800

May be due to it saying Polish and not in Polish, but it may be right. I would report it!

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wyrmksc

Why is ...parolas polan wrong but perviously Ni amas Usono. Was right? What is the rule to tell when la is or is not required? This is confusing since English is the opposite, for where the is required.

7 months ago
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