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  5. "Drikkene er veldig dyre."

"Drikkene er veldig dyre."

Translation:The drinks are very expensive.

May 29, 2015

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gothamcitygirl

Based on my time in Oslo, this is certainly the most truthful statement on Duolingo!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/effyleven

Oslo; the only place I ever saw a French family drinking water!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/patrickmccarron

The drinks are very animals


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luke_5.1991

"Animals" is actually "dyr" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/patrickmccarron

I know haha, it's just what came to my mind first.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pietvo

'Dear' is an old-fashioned English word for 'expensive'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rather_Dashing

Not that old fashioned! I use it. Maybe its regional.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JiaJunKoh

But singular 'expensive' is 'dyr' is it not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Regney
  • 2263

Yes, you're right. :0)
Drikken er dyr.
Drikkene er dyre.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zandland

This is Norway, after all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferBa56

I wonder if this is why in some parts of England you might say "the drinks are dear" instead of "the drinks are expensive"? I always used the word dear back home in Yorkshire.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/effyleven

Please note: "Dear" accepted for "expensive" in this exercise... which is nice for us Brits.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexandra282954

I find that this is also the case in southern U.S., although it might be used to mean valuable or precious more often than expensive. For example: "A necklace like that would cost you dear."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jax24

Just curious, from an etymological point of view, is there a connection between "dyr" and "dyre"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Assuming you mean between 'dyr' the noun and 'dyr' the adjective?

They have different, yet deceptively similar roots in Old Norse; dýr and dýrr, respectively, which trace back to the Proto-Indo-European dʰewsóm and diurijaz.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HairyChris88

It's about time we had a Proto-Indo-European course, isn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luke_5.1991

It would be remarkably different considering the complex grammar and the differences in culture between humans today and humans back when it was spoken.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kasturi.kulal

When the noun is in plural form (in this case 'drikkene' = the drinks), the adjective generally gets a 'e' in the end. If Drink was singular form, the statement would be 'Drikken er veldig dyr'. I hope that makes it clear.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/peter_sofos

Wouldn't it still be 'dyre' as the noun - 'drikken' - is in a definite form?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qisforben

That's a good question. Is it because the adjective doesn't precede the noun it describes?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferTauber

Yes, the definite form of the adjective is only used when it is attributive (before the noun). When it is predicative (after the noun) it only agrees for gender and number.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cezarribeiro

Ohh, tusen takk! Veldig interessant! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KosztolanyiG

And that's why Norwegians go to Sweden to get drunk. (And the Swedes go to Denmark, the Danish go to Germany, and the Germans stay at home.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NeilHutchi2

The Germans go to Spain, especially Mallorca!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/weerwater

All the more reason to start some home brewing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CogutCogutus

...said everyone visiting Norway for the first time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DrOctagonapus

Nah Oslo is more expensive than London, trust me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quetzal26021987

When you are using a negative connotation you use "too", not "very", the right translation is: "The drinks are too expensive". Sometimes Duolingo makes mistakes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Regney
  • 2263

If the drinks are too expensive, it means they are not affordable, e.g., "We went to the club but we didn't drink anything because the drinks were too expensive." (Drikkene var for dyre.)

On the other hand, if they are more expensive than that to which one is accustomed, one could say, "We went to the club and we didn't drink much because the drinks were very expensive."

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