"Hot coffee is good."

Translation:Varma kafo estas bona.

3 years ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Kulduris
Kulduris
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"Varmega kafo bonas" was right! Yes, I'm getting the hang of it, I think!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmwns

What is the difference between saying "Varmega kafo bonas" and "Varma kafo estas bona" ? How does this work?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Clara_2134

Two differences:

  • "bonas" vs "estas bona" = these mean almost the same, with almost any verb. Fluent Esperantists seem to mostly prefer the "bonas" form.

  • "Varmega" vs "varma" = from reading one of the other discussions of a sentence using "varma" in this lesson (Basics part 2, lesson 2), this seems to be about describing varying degrees of temperature, like this:

malvarma = cold,

varma = warm,

tre varma = very warm,

varmega = hot,

tre varmega = very hot.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Munuel1st
Munuel1st
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Is it also allowed to build forms like "tre malvarma" and "malvarmega"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Clara_2134

This is encouraged, even!

It is part of what Esperanto is about!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Clara_2134

I'd like to add that this approach for describing temperatures seems great to me!

EDIT: But also I should add, there seems to be some disagreement on this degree of temperature thing / how exactly to measure it, on the thread that I got this from, as well.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmwns

Does this work for all adjectives? ex: bonega (excellent) it sounds weird

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MailmanSpy

Yes and you will learn that adverbs and adjectives such as "tre" and "bona" modify how the verb/adjective/verb is while suffixes such as "-eg" and "-et" change the entire meaning of the word. Take, for example, "pafilo", "granda pafilo", "pafilego", and "granda pafilego". "Pafilo" is a gun, "granda pafilo" is a big gun, "pafilego" is a cannon, and "granda pafilego" is a big cannon. Since a cannon is basically a big gun, but a different weapon, you can just add the suffix. The same even goes for the ammunition, which is "kuglo" for a bullet and "kuglego" for a cannon-ball. You can probably do the same thing for daggers, swords, and longswords, and shacks, houses, and mansions.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Clara_2134

yes, i've read/heard the one for houses:

domo = house

domego = mansion

dometo = cottage !

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Clara_2134

Yes, bonega = excellent.

http://en.lernu.net/index.php

has an Eo-English (can be changed) dictionary in a box to the right of the page, and this agrees.

It seems that "-ega" is a suffix & "ega" is a word, both meaning "considerable/major/great".

Esperanto is wonderful for the way words can be formed by modifying & adding (even layering) suffixes etc!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ungewitig_Wiht

Mal'bon'eg'ul'land'o - un-good-er-person-land-noun - a country of terrible people.

Kok'aĵ'gust'ant'fromaĝ'o - chicken-meat-taste-ing-cheese-noun - cheese which tastes like chicken

Bier'mal'am'ant'patr'in'aro - beer-un-love-ing-dad-female-group-noun - club of mothers who hate beer

<h1>EsperantoEterne</h1>
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ungewitig_Wiht

mia patrino estus en la biermalamantpatrinaro

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Clara_2134

It probably just sounds weird because you aren't really very used to / familiar with it yet!

It will probably seem much more comfortable with time, if you continue learning & using the language!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/milosanj

No i think

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rcpjenn

This discussion reminds me of a time many years ago when I had to take a course in Medical Terminolgy. It was all Latin and Greek ( which didn't bother me at all ) and I found it fascinating. All one needed to do was take a root, and add as many prefixes and suffixes as you desired. In this way, one can describe exactly anything in medicine. I think I'm going to feel just as enthusiastic about Esperanto!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarethyuFlamel

Varma sounds like 'warm'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Menelion
Menelion
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Exactly! That is because Mr. Zamenhof took roots from different European languages, including Germanic ones like English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rainkumo
Rainkumo
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Any anti-Esperantists will call this an example of Orwellian newspeak. I like it though.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kobayashison

is "ne varmega" the only way to say "not hot" since "malvarmega" already means "very cold"? I mean, is there an order for processing the prefixes and suffix? mal(varmega) is different from (malvarm)ega

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deo.
Deo.
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So it doesn't matter whether you say "varma kafo estas bona" or "kafo varma estas bona"? :O

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xavierkiller22

Wtf, the grammar.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dante805148

Me hate do lingo

1 year ago
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