"Ŝi donas al mi tason da teo."

Translation:She gives me a cup of tea.

3 years ago

59 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/blessedwhitney

For donas think "donor" someone who gives.

Shameless plug: you can donate your bone marrow by signing up at bethematch.com. /End shameness plug. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jasonguess

Dankon! Ĝi estas tre bona!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Goim
Goim
  • 11
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 3

I have a question about plural with da/de

taso da teo - a cup of tea taso de teo - a tea cup

is it tasoj da/de teo for both?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaPingvino
LaPingvino
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2

Yes, it is :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Majklo_Blic
  • 25
  • 16
  • 11
  • 7
  • 1474

Ŝi mendas tason da teo.

Ŝi donas al mi tason da teo.

Mi trinkas la tason da teo.

La fino.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mye683629

tio estas bela

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Veztaro
Veztaro
  • 22
  • 17
  • 14
  • 8
  • 8
  • 10

Shouldn't it be tason da teon?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaPingvino
LaPingvino
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2

da is a preposition, after a preposition you don't use the accusative case.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Veztaro
Veztaro
  • 22
  • 17
  • 14
  • 8
  • 8
  • 10

Dankon multe.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidLillo2

Fun fact: the preposition for al in latin takes the accusitive

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lojbanlorxu
lojbanlorxu
  • 10
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

Oh! That is a fun fact

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/claybird121

I need a little grammatical help here. Why is it not "min"? Isn't "mi" what's receiving the cup?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jamthom8
Jamthom8
  • 18
  • 9
  • 7
  • 7
  • 4

-n is for direct objects--that is the thing the verb is being done to. If 'mi' was the direct object than she would be giving the speaker to something but she is instead giving the cup of tea to the speaker. The cup is the direct object and therefore gets the -n while the speaker is the INdirect object and therefore does not get the -n

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lojbanlorxu
lojbanlorxu
  • 10
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

To illustrate it a bit clearer you could also rearrange the sentence as "sxi donas glason da teo al mi"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MyNameIsFred

Is /tason/ good for cup and mug? or is there a different word for mug. Or maybe not a word becuase their really isn't a difference between a cup and a mug anyway.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StephenH0
StephenH0
  • 18
  • 13
  • 8
  • 3
  • 231

You can say "tasego" for mug.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SigurdS
SigurdS
  • 16
  • 16
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 6
  • 7

Is "she hands me a cup of tea" really wrong or just not mentioned/added yet?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaPingvino
LaPingvino
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2

It's not added yet, please propose it.

Also, strictly speaking you could translate she hands me as sxi enmanigas al mi.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SigurdS
SigurdS
  • 16
  • 16
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 6
  • 7

Thank you.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesNolan3
JamesNolan3
  • 16
  • 11
  • 11
  • 8
  • 8

Is there a different word for mug?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
  • 21
  • 13
  • 8
  • 1003

Someone elsewhere in this thread suggested "tasego" - and I suppose that's not a bad choice. Believe it or not, discussing dishes cross-culturally can sometimes be difficult. (What is a "suptelero" for example?) A mug might be a "granda taso" to one person and a "teglaso" to another. To someone else it might be a krucxo or krucxeto. My own take is that it's a "granda kafotaso" or just "kafotaso." In some country, tea is served in mugs and coffee in dinky cups. Best keep an open mind no matter how you say it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GoodGrief
GoodGrief
  • 16
  • 16
  • 7
  • 3
  • 2

Why isn't this correct?:

"She gives me a teacup."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jamthom8
Jamthom8
  • 18
  • 9
  • 7
  • 7
  • 4

Because she isn't giving you a teacup, she is giving you a cup of tea. A teacup would be taso de teo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nafziger10
nafziger10
  • 12
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2
  • 2

I feel like i need to go look for a refresher on how de and da Work.

In my mind de is when something pertains to another or in possession.(ex. Son de father). And i think of da as implying number i have 3 cups da tea.

But now my understanding is shaken and i feel like i need to relearn this.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidLamb3
DavidLamb3
  • 25
  • 24
  • 16
  • 396

"Da" is used where a quantity, not necessarily a number, is meant, as here - it's a cupful of tea, not a mug or a pot or a samovar.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ronaldo623
ronaldo623
  • 12
  • 10
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3

Why is the "al" needed.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
  • 17
  • 16
  • 15
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1708

"al" is "to" as in She gives the tea to me.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ronaldo623
ronaldo623
  • 12
  • 10
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3

Thanks

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/noah1786

she gives to me a cup of tea.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/calypsy
calypsy
  • 25
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 7
  • 3

I wonder too why it is not min.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jamthom8
Jamthom8
  • 18
  • 9
  • 7
  • 7
  • 4

-n is for direct objects--that is the thing the verb is being done to. If 'mi' was the direct object than she would be giving the speaker to something but she is instead giving the cup of tea to the speaker. The cup is the direct object and therefore gets the -n while the speaker is the INdirect object and therefore does not get the -n

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/calypsy
calypsy
  • 25
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 7
  • 3

Thank you.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FishyCuber

Could someone please explain to me the difference between 'de' and 'da'? Dankon.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
  • 17
  • 16
  • 15
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1708
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GirlWithTheGold

Is tason constructed of any other words?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
  • 17
  • 16
  • 15
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1708

Esperanto takes "tas*" from either the German or the French word "tasse", which means "cup".

The -o suffix makes it a noun.
The -j suffix would make it plural.
The -n suffix makes it accusative.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GirlWithTheGold

Thank you! Do you know what kind of cup this is? Like the type that holds water or the measurement cup (8 oz)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
  • 17
  • 16
  • 15
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1708

Given the context of this sentence, I would say at the very least it's the kind of cup you drink from. Whether it can also mean measuring cup or if there's a different word for that, I don't know.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GirlWithTheGold

Oh okay, well thank you!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
  • 21
  • 13
  • 8
  • 1003

8 ounce measuring cups are unknown outside the US. Also keep in mind that "taso" is generally a cup with a handle.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidLamb3
DavidLamb3
  • 25
  • 24
  • 16
  • 396

Yes, and it causes problems to non-US people trying to follow an American recipe! How about "mezurtaso"? But that still would not give any indication of size.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
  • 21
  • 13
  • 8
  • 1003

I've posted a few recipes for an international audience. I'm trying to remember how this works. out. 8 liquid ounces is something short of 250 ml. Our various measuring spoons work out almost exactly to divisions of 5 ml. You also run into trouble when the recipe calls for "1 box" or "1 can" of something -- since even within the US and over time there's no guarantee that boxes and cans will remain the same size. Then you run into the problem when a recipe calls for "1 box of yellow cake mix." We take so much of this stuff for granted.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThaleZOliver
ThaleZOliver
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6

Help me!!!! Together the object pronouns...

-Sxi donas min (She gives me)????? or can just be -Sxi donas AL mi

Vi kisas lin (You kiss him)

Explain me the uses

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
  • 17
  • 16
  • 15
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1708

The -n suffix in Esperanto marks the direct object of a transitive verb. This is the thing being acted on.

Sxi kisas min. Who is being kissed?
Sxi donas libron. What is being given?

In English, the indirect object of a transitive verb, or the thing that is receiving the direct object, can be expressed in two different ways. If we put it before the direct object, it remains unmarked. But if it comes after the direct object, it needs a preposition.

She gave me a book. What was given? Who received it?
She gave a book to me. What was given? Who received it?

In Esperanto, the syntax does not affect the grammar. Regardless of whether the indirect object goes before or after the direct object, it takes a preposition. And the direct object is always marked.

Sxi donis al mi libron.
Sxi donis libron al mi.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
  • 21
  • 13
  • 8
  • 1003

"Donas" can seem tricky for English speakers because "give" is often used two ways in English. "Give ME that" and "Give THAT to me." In Esperanto, you always put the N on the thing given and then say "al" for who it's given to.

  • Donu al mi libron. = Give me a book.
  • Donu libron al mi. = Give a book to me.
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/batra204
batra204
  • 19
  • 10
  • 8
  • 6
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

Can we use min instead of al mi?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
  • 21
  • 13
  • 8
  • 1003

No. Two reasons. First, it's best to avoid two accusatives in a row. Second, "sxi donis min" means that "me" was given by her to someone.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nytheris

So is it only the word directly after the preposition that doesn't take the accusative? Is that why it's tason rather than taso?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
  • 17
  • 16
  • 15
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1708

The fact that "teo" is the object of a preposition overrides the fact that "tason da teo" is the entire direct object of the transitive verb "donas".

If it were a large blue cup instead of a cup of tea, then it would be "Ŝi donas al mi grandan bluan tason".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Honema
Honema
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

Would "a teacup of tea" be "taso de teo da teo"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/krazykooper

What makes this accusative to have the n in tason?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
  • 17
  • 16
  • 15
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1708

"Tason" is the direct object of "donas". What is being given? A cup.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/narkop___
narkop___
  • 13
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4

Does "al" kind of designate an indirect object?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
  • 17
  • 16
  • 15
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1708

In this sentence it does. The cup of tea is the direct object, what is given. "Me" is the indirect object, who it is given to. We can say it the same way in English: She gives to me a cup of tea.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/.elfin.
.elfin.
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2

sounds like ASMR

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BlankName1

Why is al used here. Isnt al, to?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
  • 17
  • 16
  • 15
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 1708

Yes. In English we can say it one of two ways:

She gives me a cup of tea.
or
She gives a cup of tea to me.

In Esperanto, that "to" is required regardless of whether that phrase comes before or after the direct object.

Ŝi donas al mi tason da teo.
or
Ŝi donal tason da teo al mi.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
  • 21
  • 13
  • 8
  • 1003

Some verbs have two objects. These are called the direct object and the indirect object.

So, with a verb like "to give" or "doni" there are three things involved - the giver - the recipient - the gift

I give you a dog.

"I" is the subject, "you" is the indirect object, "a dog" is the direct object.

It means the same as "I give a dog to you".

In Esperanto, the indirect object is marked with "al."

10 months ago
Learn Esperanto in just 5 minutes a day. For free.

Learn Esperanto in just 5 minutes a day. For free.