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"Estas grava tago en la parko."

Translation:It is an important day in the park.

3 years ago

49 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/TateRasmus
TateRasmus
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But what is happening there?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Whoaholycow

estas picnic :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/linguisticat
linguisticat
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Jes! Estas granda pikniko por ĉiuj la Esperantistoj, ĉar Duolingo enkondukas Esperanton sur ilian retejon! - Yeah I probably massacred that sentence, but that is why I'm here - to improve my Esperanto. And very excited about it too!!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/STEEZY-DEO

I've been learning Esperanto for only 3 days and I understood most of that pretty quickly :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ronlin2808

gratulon!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AaronKurz
AaronKurz
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Mangxajxo! Tio estas tre grava! ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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La muzikistoj "Chicago" ludas kaj kantas Esperante tien!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gaby754722
Gaby754722
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The grass is growing faster than last year!

Isn't it exciting?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnnyMnemonic85

I put "an important day is in the park"

but if it's "It is" an important day, shouldn't it be "Gi estas grava..." ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lazar.ljubenovic
lazar.ljubenovic
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As far as I know, it's simply a construction in Esperanto for saying that something exists.

In English, when you say "It is an important day", "it" doesn't really refer to anything specific, it just has to be there for the sentence to be complete. Similar with "There is/are" -- you're not literally referring to a specific location whenever you say that phrase.

In Esperanto, "Ĝi estas grava tago" would but an emphasis on ĝi, meaning that you're referring to a specific day which would be obvious if there was context. The sentence as it is, without ĝi, implies that today is an important day in the park.

Take it all with a grain of salt since I'm an Esperanto beginner as well, though.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoeJScott
JoeJScott
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3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/heptapod

This

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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The comment that you're referring to already has some good answers posted to it When translating "it is" you only use "gxi" if there's an actual "it" in the world doing the thing. The "it" in "it is an important day" is simply a grammatical placeholder in English and doesn't refer to an "actual it" -- so no "gxi".

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidLamb3
DavidLamb3
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What is "This" referring to? Do you accidentally click "Post" before you had finished?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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Often a simple "this" is online slang for "the post that I'm replying to says exactly what I was going to say." I've replied with that understanding in mind.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatriciaJH

There are a lot of non-native English speakers on these comments pages -- I expect them to NOT understand English this/that references. So I just repeat the subject, which also removes a lot of ambiguity, and makes my writing clearer in general. Repeating the subject for non-English speakers is something I learned when doing international tech support for a really complicated programming product. <-Note that the bolded section could have been a "this".

Also, on the Duolingo comments pages, likes and dislikes can move replies away from the original posting.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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This thread is four months old and nobody has come back to explain whether "this" means something or whether he hit enter too soon. Probably no sense in commenting of the people you're talking to aren't checking in.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Quillosh

That moment when it asks for you to type what you see in english, but you type it in Esperanto...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kevinguy19
Kevinguy19
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Why is serious an option for "grava", but it's not accepted as an answer? I'm pretty sure that they didn't simply miss it, because the note said that "grava means important, not serious".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Latcarf
Latcarf
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Because there are cases where "serious" and "important" are synonymous, in which case "grava" can mean "serious". For instance "a serious problem" is the same as "an important problem".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kevinguy19
Kevinguy19
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Ok, I think I get it. Thanks.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SariahLily
SariahLily
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FWIW, it accepted "serious" just now for me. May 2017

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zbrojny120

Why isn't "there is an important day in the park" accepted?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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  • 1709

Because that doesn't make much sense in standard American English. It might be current in other dialects, but Duo tends to stick with the standard.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidLamb3
DavidLamb3
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"There is an important day in the park" is now accepted - I just tried it!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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Sometimes the course authors add clearly wrong answers (and by clearly wrong, I mean answers which nobody, even the course authors themselves, believes to be correct), with the goal of "not frustrating" learners. These include obvious misspellings such as "breath" for "breathe" -- and apparently "there is" when context clearly calls for "it is."

If someone were to say "Ni iru! Estas grava tago en la parko." There would be no doubt that he was talking about today. It's an important day in the park. Without the "ni iru" it would also be clear that it means "it is."

So the answer to zbrojny120's question is that when talking about things like days, with no contrived context, "it is" is the first meaning that should spring to mind, since, generally speaking, things like days aren't found lying around in parks.

It is true that "there is a day" is a possible translation, but only if there was a context that made that seem plausible. "Cxujare, estas grava tago en la parko." Yearly, there is an important day in the park. Without some special context, possible does not mean "likely" or "best."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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Oni pensus, ke estis la kvara de julio

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FaizalZahid
FaizalZahid
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Is there any plural?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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Of the sentence? Indeed. just not here. Estas gravaj tagoj en la parkoj. The ~j is used to indicate that a noun, and any associated adjectives, are plural.

There is NO plural form of any of the verbs.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FaizalZahid
FaizalZahid
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Yeah, I know that but why is this sentence in plural section?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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Pro tio mi ne havas respondon. Duo faras tian aferon foje.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/javebra

excuse me as a natural spanish speaker I have a english grammar question. Why should be this sentence : It's an serious day in the park instead It's a serious day in the park (the rule of "a" or "an " was related to the next word if it is begins with vocal or not)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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  • 1709

It should be "a serious day" because "serious" begins with a consonant sound. If Duo told you it should be "an serious day" then it's wrong and that should be reported.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/javebra

Thanks

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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In English, we use a before any word with a consonantal sound. An is used before vowels. There are exceptions to this, words which start with an h being the largest one.

Since you speak Spanish you should recognize the word naranja which came into English as "a noranj" and fairly quickly turned into "an orange." Esperanto fixes this "feature."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/javebra

Thanks

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MardiMonkey
MardiMonkey
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How is this plural?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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Faulty selection algorithm?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MardiMonkey
MardiMonkey
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Probably it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaJackson9

I think it was the Fourth of July.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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Mi diris tiun pli frue, sed Esperante. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Em.Jayne

is there no 'direct object' in this sentence? I mean, shouldn't one of these nouns have -n at the end? or nah?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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Nah. One of the clues is "estas". No -n with estas.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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No. Only transitive verbs can have direct objects, and only active verbs (verbs of action) can be transitive. Verbs like "to be" are stative verbs (verbs of state) and take subject complements. They act to equate or compare the subject with the predicate.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Divad52

"The important day is in the park."?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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  • 1709

"The important day is in the park"
La grava tago estas en la parko.

"It is an important day in the park"
Estas grava tago en la parko.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John53424
John53424
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Malgranda Sebastiano!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isaac3972

I think this may be a lot like German and occasionally English (and probably other languages) where there are implied pronouns. Like when your grandma says "eat," there's an implied "you" in front of the verb.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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No, it's very different.

When Grandma says "eat", this is an imperative. This is well understood and works the same in English and Esperanto. In Esperanto you use a -u ending (manĝu!) and the assumption is that you give a command, you're giving it to the person you're talking to -- so saying "you eat!" would be redundant. In English it would also be mistaken for an indicative sentence meaning "I know that you eat on a regular basis."

However, with "It is an important day", the word "it" is just a grammatical placeholder. Just like in "it's raining". When we say that it is raining, there's no actual it doing the action. In these situations, we don't use a subject in Esperanto. "Pluvas" (it's raining). For this reason these are often called "weather verbs" -- although they're also called "impersonal".

6 months ago