"Ben senin gibiyim."

Translation:I am like you.

May 29, 2015

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DottyEyes

Grammar reason why it's not "Ben seni gibiyim"? Is it perhaps because the structure is more like "I have your likeness"? Thanks, friends, for the help! Arkadaşlar, yardım için teşekkürler!

May 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ektoraskan

Interesting idea. But it's "I am", not "I have". So… I don't know…

There are some words that can be easily be used with normal nouns, but require the possessive forms when used with subject pronouns:

Araba gibi - like a car, but Senin gibi - like you.

The suffix "-(y)le" (with) is the same:

Arabayla - with the car, but Seninle - with you.

It's just a special rule.

May 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DottyEyes

Thanks! I'll just remember that those pronouns sometimes take endings where regular nouns don't, just like in English. In English, pronouns are the only words nowadays that change endings depending on their case (other than possessive). To the house, from the house, of the house, the house. To him, from him, of his, he.

May 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phillip_Davis

I think since "senin" is genitive, the literal meaning would be something like "I am of your likeness."

March 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ektoraskan

But gibi has no possessive (one would expect it to be: senin gibin)... So I'm not too sure if we can analyze it that way

March 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phillip_Davis

Good point. Oh well...

March 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/canongigue

Why not 'I like you'? I think the translation hint should provide different translation.

October 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

The last word "gibi" means like and has the 1st person personal ending on it :) It is not the verb "to like," which is "beğenmek."

October 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MelisaHati

'I like you.' means 'I love you.' = 'Seni seviyorum.' But 'I'm like you.' means 'I'm similar with you.' = 'Sana benziyorum.'

April 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quattrostelle

I'm having the hardest time with gibi constructions :-/ Having some notes on this would be helpful.

January 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrHilmiNevzat

"Ben senin gibiyim." Translation: I am like you.

"Ne senden fazlayım Ne senden az Aynı macerada ayrı biraz." - I am the same as you.

November 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuergenZirak

Is "Senin gibi benim" equivalent/correct? Because I have encountered other cases/questions in this course, where the phrase with "gibi" is preceding the noun which the comparison describes - much like an adjective.

December 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrHilmiNevzat

Hello JrgenZirak

"Ben senin gibiyim." Translation: I am like you.

"Senin gibi benim" - Like you I am. Do you agree on my translation of your answer? Gibi - (adjective) & (adverb) Benim - (Pronoun) My, mine, of mine (genitive of ben).

Your word order is a bit muddled: Subject - object - verb.

I cannot explain this any further for you & has Duo accepted your answer? Kind regards & have a very Happy New Year.

December 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuergenZirak

Thank you for your answer and a Happy New Year to you as well. I haven't had the opportunity to test "Senin gibi benim" yet - I hadn't tried it when I posted that comment. It's just that shortly before I had stumbled across ""Duo gibi kuş, İstanbul gibi ev yok!", where the "* gibi" phrases were preceding the nouns they describe. I guess it is the final verb "yok" that makes the difference in that case. In my suggestion there is no verb (unless you count the implicit "to be" corresponding to the "-im" suffix). So without the explicit verb it would seem more natural to consider the "senin gibi" a predicate/object and not an adjective phrase - and hence put it after the subject. Am I right?

December 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrHilmiNevzat

JrgenZirak

Good morning to you & some examples for you to see.

Postpositions - topic:

“Elma gibi bir meyve” - A fruit like an apple.

“Duo gibi kuş, İstanbul gibi ev yok” - There is no bird like Duo, no home like Istanbul.

Yüzüme bakti, gözlerime, ama senin gibi değil.

Hiç kimse senin gibi, canımdan öte can değil.

(Adverb) - değil

Not (negates meaning of verb "to be") Mutlu olabilirsin, ama ben değilim. You may be happy, but I am not.

Evli değil misiniz? Aren't you married?

(Noun) - değil (definite accusative değili, plural değiller)

Gibi does go after the (noun)

canımdan - (noun) - my life.

December 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuergenZirak

Hello MrHilmiNevzat,

Thanks a lot for taking the effort and posting all those examples. My main point originally was the slight confusion about the Turkish word order when translating something like "... is like ", but as posted before I think I more or less get it now.

In one case it is "A(=noun phrase or pronoun) is like X", with a clear subject and object , which translate to "A X gibi(+person suffix)".

On the other hand we have "There is a/no A like X", where I'm actually not quite clear what the subject is in the English sentence, at least the A alone does not play the role of a normal subject. In Turkish that is expressed more like the English "An A like X exists/does not exist" - Or even "An X-like A exists/does not exist" (although the latter sounds a bit unnatural). So the "like X" isn't an object, but a descriptive, adjective-like phrase, which goes first in Turkish: "X gibi A var".

The cause of my original confusion boils down to different uses of "to be" in English, I guess. Not unlike the case of "A is X" vs. "A is a/an Y ", with X being a property/adjective, and Y a category where the "is" is typically expressed with different words in romance and celtic languages. (Spanish "Ser"/"Estar", Irish "Tá"/"Is").

December 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qusay0

I like you

May 27, 2018
Learn Turkish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.