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"Good morning, how are you?"

Translation:Bonan matenon, kiel vi fartas?

May 29, 2015

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HitoMem

I have heard that you can say "kiel vi" to mean "how are you" instead of "kiel vi fartas" to specifically mean "how do you feel". Wouldn't that work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZelieZazou

Yes it would, but it is not accepted here... :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adrian729689

It's VERY lazy. Generally only used when non-Esperantist English speakers are listening in, because it stops them laughing when they hear the 'false friend'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nspot

Why can't we say "kiel vi estas" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mouxon

Yes, why is "estas" refused?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2363

Probably because it's not the same idiom as it is in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heysoos1

That would be something like asking "how do you exist?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sheshanpatel

Can "How are you" be translated as "Kiom estas vi"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lingvulo

No, "kiom" means "how much" (in terms of quantity).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andreim1828

fartas gives me the creeps


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deact1vated_User

Sometimes, I wish whoever created the Esperanto language would have picked a different word besides fartas. For obvious reasons, it just sounds weird.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2363

Zamenhof didn't speak English, so this never would have occurred to him.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deact1vated_User

I suppose that makes sense. It still just sounds weird, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2363

Zamenhof took it from the German fahrt, which means "journey". It's cognate with the English "fare".

Of course, there is a natural language where "fart" means something else.

https://inktank.fi/10-english-words-mean-something-else-languages/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andr16065

or maybe he took it from the nordic languares where it is spelled 'fart' without the 'h' and which is globally used nowadays in the runners community in name for a popular training method, 'fartlek'. fart = speed . btw in French and Spanish you say ''how are you going?'' for 'how are you?' as well, so it is not that far(t) fetched.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew122126

What does the word "fartas" itself mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2363

It's the present-tense conjugation of "farti", which is essentially the English "fare". "How are you faring?"

https://esperanto.stackexchange.com/questions/4771/difference-between-fari-and-farti


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cauerego

and if you're also not familiar (like me) with "fare" in this sentence, perhaps you heard it as "farewell" or "fare thee well", i just learned. in english, it means to proceed or get along.

it's also interesting to notice the similarities with "fari", in esperanto: https://esperanto.stackexchange.com/questions/4771/difference-between-fari-and-farti


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LunaMarie30749

When do I use "bone" and when do I use "bonan"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2363

Adverbs end in -e.
Adjectives end in -a.
Any noun/adjective (except for "la") that's in the accusative (direct object of a transitive verb) gets the -n suffix.

The greeting is "bonan matenon" because it's short for something like "I bid you a good morning" or "I hope you have a good morning" or something along those lines.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nathankoren

Just curious -- would "kiel fartas vin" not be acceptable? Is "vi" not a direct object in this case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/potatoeglot

It's not a direct object. A direct object is the one receiving the action (i.e. in "Mi amas vin", "vin" receives the action "amas" given by the subject "mi"). But "vi" here is the subject and is the one that does or experiences the action, so it can't be in the accusative case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2363

Beyond what crimson_seraph said, "farti" is a stative verb and stative verbs don't have direct objects. Instead, they take subject complements.

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