"Children love rabbits."

Translation:Infanoj amas kuniklojn.

3 years ago

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/greenq
greenq
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"kuniklo" is from Latin "cunīculus", Ancient Greek "κύνικλος"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MoiSelf
MoiSelf
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Compare

Asturian: conexu, coneyu

Catalan: conill

Danish: kanin

Dutch: konijn

English: coney

Friulian: cunin

Galician: coello

German: Kaninchen

Irish: coinín

Italian: coniglio

Norwegian: kanin

Occitan: conilh

Old French: connil

Portuguese: coelho, cunículo

Romansch: cunigl, cunegl, canign

Sardinian: conígiu, conígliu, coníliu, conillu, cunidhu, cunixu

Sicilian: cunigghiu, cunigliu

Spanish: conejo

Swedish: kanin

Venetian: cunicio, cunin, cunel, conicio, conéjo

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tenhobi
tenhobi
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Czech: králík

:D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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You missed out Welsh: Cwning(en)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HerrArbo
HerrArbo
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What does "coney" mean? I've never heard that before.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alareshu
Alareshu
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It means a rabbit! Perhaps a bit outdated nowadays, but it used to be in some Bible translations and stuff.

Fun fact: it's also related to Coney Island in NY- rabbits used to be found there, so it was named appropriately.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drakovyrn
drakovyrn
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So what does or mean when i go to Sonic and get a Coney Dog...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jumpthewalls
jumpthewalls
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I was wondering this. Thanks for the clarification! :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mycelial.ajna

I answered with "Geknaboj" instead of infanoj, just to see, and it totally worked :) good job duolingo ~

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drakovyrn
drakovyrn
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I asked this on a different thread, and you've answered my question! Dankon! :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Novantico
Novantico
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I'm probably wrong about this, but does anyone think that "geknaboj" should be an accepted replacement for "infanoj"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zerozeroone
zerozeroone
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With no facts to back things up....

I would say no, but without a lot of conviction. Geknaboj would be multiple children where there are both girls and boys, while infanoj says nothing about the gender of the children...it could be an all-boy, all-girl, or mixed group.

In standard Esperanto, ge- means both sexes together, and is normally only seen in the plural. In conversation, however, singular ge- is not uncommonly extended to meanings such as *gepatro "a parent" when a speaker either doesn't know or doesn't wish to reveal the gender of the noun.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Riism#Epicene_prefixes

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Novantico
Novantico
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Since it doesn't specify the genders of the children, I think it'd be fine with either infanoj or geknaboj. I'll give it a report and see what happens.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mycelial.ajna

worked for me just now, so they must have heard.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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There is a difference between infanoj and geknaboj. The former means children without respect to gender. The latter refers to a mixed group of boys and girls.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arancaytar
Arancaytar
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First I mistranslated kuniklojn as "chickens", and then "rabbits" as kokojn.

Apparently I'm really convinced that chickens are children's favorite animal.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tdannenbaum

Question: How do I know when to put the "n" at the end of a word? Because sometimes, for example, I have to write "Kunikloj" and others "kuniklojn". Could someone please explain the rule for that?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alareshu
Alareshu
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We call the -n the accusative case. There's a more in-depth explanation somewhere in the notes on here.

Basically, using the sentence "children love rabbits", "children" is the subject, "love" is the verb, and "rabbits" is the direct object.

The subject does the verb, and the direct object has the verb done to it. The rabbits are loved by the children.

You use the accusative case with direct objects. You do NOT use it when "esti" (to be) is involved, since that's thought to be an equalizer (the boy is a student = the student is a boy).

Examples:

The accusative pronouns: min = me, vin = you (object), lin = him, ŝin = her, ĝin = it (object), nin = us, ilin = them.

Mi amas vin. Vin amas mi. = I love you.

Vi amas min. Min amas vi. = You love me.

Ni vidas kelkajn kuniklojn. Kelkajn kuniklojn vidas ni. = We see some rabbits.

Kelkaj kunikloj vidas nin. Nin vidas kelkaj kunikloj. = Some rabbits see us.

EDIT: I see you've learned some German as well. The accusative case is also in German, which you have to change some aspects for (i.e, der -> den, ich -> mich, etc).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tdannenbaum

Thank you very much for the explanation. It's true that I study German, but I do it outside of Duolingo, in my school. Almost everyone in my year have been learning German for almost 10 years, and we still have problems with the declinations.

At first I thought the "n" was for plural, because it sounded natural to me, because of German. As you probably know, what changes depending on the declination is the article, and in order to do that correctly, you have to know the articles, which I don't (most of them). That's why I've added German to my Duolingo, to learn them.

Just to be sure, are other endings for other declinations, like in German "Nominativ", "Akkusativ" (which we just talked about), "Dativ" or "Genetiv", and do the words have different endings in each one?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alareshu
Alareshu
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Haha, I do the same, and have the same problems. It really is quite tricky to get the hang of. And yes, the articles are so annoying to remember/memorize. At least it's only the masculine that usually changes so often? (These things can be such a cold comfort when learning languages, lol.) I'm more proficient in German than on Duolingo, it's more laziness that I don't have a higher level.

Nominativ = subject, Akkusativ = accusative. Those are the only ones in Esperanto. Dativ and Genetiv have to be supplemented with words, like in English (de - of, from; al - to; etc).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tdannenbaum

Thank god... Otherwise my head would have exploded.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Himawari34

Mi amas kuniklojn(๑•̀ㅁ•́๑)✧

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kajmak383

What's the difference between: Infano and bebo?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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child, baby

The second one is smaller.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kajmak383

Dankon!

5 months ago
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