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  5. "Bonvolu, kara!"

"Bonvolu, kara!"

Translation:Please, dear!

May 29, 2015

28 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olyglotED

is Kara used in a light, motherly way as in "dear," or "dear" like 'sweetheart,' 'carino' etc. (romantic implications) ?

May 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vikungen

Definitely in the romantic way, but probably also in a more light, motherly way as you describe it.

May 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zerozeroone

As an example, it's used at the beginning of each news broadcast from China Radio International Online.

Saluton, karaj amikoj!

http://esperanto.cri.cn/

November 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaribbeanMax

It's an expression very informal! It comes from the Italian word "caro/a" with mean "dear". it's also very common in the UK. It could be a bit strange because it sounds romantic, but they even kiss each other on the cheek. (Don't forget Esperanto is a mix of languages).

December 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shiunsai

Kara sounds a lot like "cara" in brazilian portuguese, which means something like dude, or guy.

June 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Flavio_do_Brasil

Yeah lol.

I'll need to think of "cara querida" (pronounced "kara kerida") to avoid unintentional flirting.

July 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tomaloha

What's cara querida mean?

March 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabriel_Bach

Literally, it means wanted. This word is used as a vocative to someone (usually a wife or daughter = darling), but also as an adjective, which is the case here, meaning dear or beloved.

January 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucasDiniz22

that is what i first wrote rsrrs

November 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaribbeanMax

It's not related to the BRAZILIAN SLAG "cara". It comes from the Italian word "caro/a" which means "dear".

December 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MJC182

Kara = dear. However does kara also equate to 'expensive' as in La kafo granda estas kara?

June 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaCa826187

In British English 'dear' can mean both as well. That shirt's a bit dear etc.

July 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruruskadoo

Terribly late reply, but in English dear means valuable. So a person may be dear to you (hence affectionately referring to a person as 'dear'), or a mistake could cost you dearly.

February 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaribbeanMax

It'd definitely be "multekosta"

December 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brooke137956

In French, the word "chère" means "dear" in every English sense of the word (to begin a letter, as a pet name [or chèrie]) and also means "expensive." I didn't realize we also did that in English (I'm American and we don't use "dear" that way), so I suppose it's more common all over than I thought.

August 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaUsualSuspect19

The plot THICC ens.

November 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GastonDorren

Do adjectives keep their -a ending, even when they're used as nouns? Or shouldn't I consider it a noun here?

May 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexhuggs

I think it would be short for 'Dear one' or something like that. You couldn't have a 'dear' (value, not to be confused with 'deer', that animal.)

May 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GastonDorren

Thank you. The trouble is, when adjectives are used as nouns, one can always interpret them the way you suggest. But I suppose I'll learn more about it in due time. Mi estas komencanto, after all.

May 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexhuggs

Yes. Languages have their own quirks. It's logical once you get the hang of it, but the logic is often different in each language.

May 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CapdeBurro

Why does that word end with u? What word class is this?

May 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erchenswine

From when I used to learn Esperanto on a different website, +u indicates the imperative.

May 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JDLENL

Lernu!

June 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erchenswine

That's the one. :P

June 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TobyBartels

So it's an imperative ‘Be of good will!’?

July 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaCa826187

I suppose estu applies only to ﷲ? I'm kind of disappointed that my keyboard didn't have the ligature.

July 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AANickFan

It sounds like he's saying "Bonvonu".

December 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SemAarrest

Kara is also used as "Kjære" in scandinavian countries.

November 21, 2017
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