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"Doğum günü"

Translation:Birthday

May 29, 2015

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Complex77

As there are quite some people here who are interested in the orgin of words ...

Did you notice the similarity of doğum (birth) and doğu (east)?

I would not be surprised if those words had the same origin. The sun is "born" in the east, after all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selcen_Ozturk

that's true, because for "to rise" for sun, we also say "doğmak" , e.g. "güneş doğdu".

and similarly, when sun goes down we say "güneş batıyor" - batmak, to go down, batı, west ;)

Yani güneş doğudan doğar, batıdan batar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HishamAhamad

So "Happy birthday to you" would be "Seni mutlu doğum günü"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ektoraskan

No, because "happy birthday to you" has 6 syllables, but "seni mutlu doğum günü" has 8, so it would be impossible to sing it. ;p

So we say: Mutlu yıllar sana. (Happy years to you)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HishamAhamad

pictures rhyme in mind ,shakes head vigorously Yeah, this tune is catchy! :-P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Selcen_Ozturk

and.. " "Seni mutlu doğum günü" makes no sense :) Although we don't say that, grammatically it would be "sana", not seni :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brjaga
  • 2187

The extra -I on "günü" is because this is a construct, right? How would you say "his/her birthday"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ektoraskan

Yes. The "constructs", as you put it, don't change in the "his/her" form. So:

birthday: doğum günü

his/her birthday: (onun) doğum günü


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brjaga
  • 2187

Sorry, I thought I saw that term used to describe this kind of thing in Turkish, but maybe I was getting confused with Arabic. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AGreatUserName

Yeah, it's used in a similar way to the construct state in Arabic and Hebrew.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Princess_Nancy

What is the difference between gün and günü when to use what?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cianobosj

It's a Noun Compound. Read the tips and notes and you'll get it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cbthomas2006

The recording sounds quite bad

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