"Mi matenmanĝas kun ili."

Translation:I eat breakfast with them.

May 29, 2015

62 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samhorlockesp

I use "breakfast" as a verb in English. Apparently that's not allowed. :(

May 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoeJScott

same - allowed now!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Novantico

Really? I don't think I've ever heard of using it that way (American from the northeast)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jimnice

lol, maybe it is a west coast thing; we sometimes breakfast in Arizona.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aramande

While reading A Song of Ice and Fire, I realized that breakfast actually stands for Breaking of the fast. So you sometimes break your fast in Arizona. :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benevolent97

"Breaking of the fast[ing]". I did not realize that. Suddenly I feel like I unlocked a mystical knowledge thanks to you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OnesimusUnbound

If I'm not mistaken, in european middle ages, people don't eat in the morning to fast and they end up unproductive. Hence it was decided to "break the fast" :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/janKawa

Now it makes complete sense, in fact it's the same deal with Canadian French

Déjeuner (Dé)=Undo (Jeuner)=to fast

so it would literally mean, to undo fasting.

This just blew my mind!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cvictoria42

The "fast" in "breakfast" refers to the nightly "fast" when you're asleep. Your first meal of the day is thus breaking your nightly fast.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Interrobang3

Utah here, never heard it used that way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jacobthedrummer

Never heard it on the west coast or the Midwest or Canada either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/notthesun_

You can also lunch with someone! I don't know if you can dinner though... I guess you good just say dine!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/liskarh

Yes, or you can say you supped with someone (as in supper). :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davgwynne

In the UK breakfast would be used in this way. For example: I breakfast with my wife every morning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/narkop___

I'm from California, and using "breakfast" as a verb is strange to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zmjb1

Do you ever do lunch?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KX3.

As in having lunch with someone, why not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoJeBo

I've never heard that, but a trend has started in which the "to food" is being treated as a verb meaning "to go eat"

e.g. do you want to food? or who wants to food

So, I'm not surprised breakfast is used as a verb in some places.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoJeBo

I live in Ohio in the USA.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

Anywhere near Dayton?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zagadka314

I am from Chillicothe, but currently I live in Warsaw and fI am about to move to Hamburg


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

I'd already checked Pasporta Servo.

Mia celo estis sciigi al aliaj en la regiono.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

I asked because my sister is visiting Xenia OH and I'm looking for a second excuse to visit the area - such as to speak Esperanto with some folks there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DillonReyn

No way, Esperanto can word-build like German? SWEET!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/altindiefanboy

Yes, it's one of the most important parts of Esperanto. Most words are made from putting root words together, similar to German :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ungewitig_Wiht

What's Esperanto for Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz? I hope it is ridiculous and long like the actual word is


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brauxljo

Bovaĵo markigo monitorado delegacio Leĝo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JackBond

Ich frühstücke mit ihnen!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvanBG

Shouldn't this end with "ilin" because it's an object?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AVAX3M

No, it shouldn't, and yes, it's an object, but not a direct object. "Ili" isn't directly acted upon by "eat", that's why, but "I" only does "eat" with "ili", not that "ili" is eaten, just the "breakfast".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yarjka

"Mi matenmanĝas ilin" = "I eat them for breakfast"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AVAX3M

I don't know if that's right, but your suggestion is another story. But let me tell you something, the sentence above means, you're eating "with them" at breakfast, not "eating them". But I believe that "with them" doesn't only mean "with other people", for example, it can also mean "with foods/food items on the table other than the main breakfast itself". However, I still appreciate your suggestion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tommyklochny

I disagree. "Mi mangxas ilin" means I eat them, so "Mi matenmangxas ilin" would be I eat them for breakfast.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yarjka

Ah, very helpful clarification!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lohnesinpr

I also would say I breakfast with them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveT

I translated this as "take breakfast" and got an error.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rippler

Report it, that should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JasmineEllaine

Is it okay to say "Mi mangxas matenmangxon kun ili"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bluehooloovo

Mi estas komencanto, but it seems like that would be fine.


[deactivated user]

    That would mean "I eat breakfast with them", not "I breakfast with them", but it should be fine.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vqetu

    What is going one here ? BREAKFAST !


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n0ot

    LOL gotta love the "A Game of Thrones" reference. I think I've heard of "to break fast" from other novels as well. Never heard it in modern usage though, nor have I heard of the verb "to breakfast," but I'm going to start using that one now.

    I found a reference to "To break one's fast:" https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/break_one%27s_fast


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/northernguy

    Not to be confused with breaking wind.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rippler

    You mean you don't do both at the same time? I thought everyone did.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/altindiefanboy

    Actually it isn't trying to reference anything; the actual Esperanto usage is very common.

    "Matenmanĝi" means "to eat for breakfast", not "to break the fast", though if you try to translate the word literally into English it might seem that way. You''ll find that Esperanto often expresses with a single verb or adverb something that English would express with a phrase.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stephbutler19

    Could this be translated as "I am having breakfast with them." ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Novantico

    It certainly retains the meaning if you see it as such. I believe it to be a very reasonable interpretation.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dirosissaias

    to take a breakfast is wrong ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JackBond

    Typically in English, "breakfast" is treated as a concept, not a countable noun. You "have/eat breakfast", but you usually don't "take breakfast", unless you're taking a full breakfast meal somewhere else.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IgorPetruk2

    Can I translate "Do you want to eat breakfast with me?" as "Ĉu vi volis matenmanĝi kun mi?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jerettferett

    Beginner here, but i would say yes except I would say 'volas' instead of 'volis'. Volis is past tense, wanted.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guncero

    "morning-eating" sounds much more intuitive than "eating of the break from the fast"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Walter375725

    What is wrong with "I have breakfast with them" ? It seems to me that "To eat breakfast" and "To have breakfast" is the same thing. English speaking people (at least Canadians) would rather say "to have breakfast". By the way you can "have breakfast" but not necessary "to eat it".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kcirehikari88

    Matenmangas is a compount word right?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heruende

    why is it "Mi matenmangas kun ili" and not "Mi matenmangas kun ilin"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

    Because "kun" is an ordinary preposition and you'll never have an -n ending with an ordinary preposition.

    More info on the two kinds of prepositions here: https://blogs.transparent.com/esperanto/keys-to-understanding-esperanto-prepositions/


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/henrique408209

    I am breakfasting with them

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