1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Esperanto
  4. >
  5. "Children like puppies and ki…

"Children like puppies and kittens."

Translation:Infanoj ŝatas hundidojn kaj katidojn.

May 30, 2015

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoeJScott

Momentarily forgot "infanoj" so used "geknaboj" instead (having never seen the word before, just throwing the prefix on to see if it worked) and it was accepted! The system works! :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Goim

The magic of Esperanto =D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rahgots

Could you say homidoj instead of infanoj?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alareshu

"little humans"... 's got a certain alienesque feel to it. I LIKE IT.

ALL CHILDREN ARE NOW LITTLE HUMANS.

EDIT: lel I just realized "homido" is "human offspring", not "hometo" like I originally saw...

MI ŜATAS AMBAŬ, KAJ MI UZOS AMBAŬ. HOMETOJ ESTAS LA IDOJ DE HOMOJ- ILI ESTAS HOMIDOJ.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fizzy224385

I thought hometo was dwarf


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2676

According to Google Translate, "hometo" is specifically Thumbkin. "Dwarf" is "nano" (from the Latin root that gave us "nanosecond") or "gnomo".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alareshu

It's literally "little human", because the -et- suffix denotes smallness, and homo means "human".

It might be used to refer to dwarves (as in English's "little person"), but it literally means "little human" and thus can also be used to refer to children humorously.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stivorino

Children playing dress up?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vanege

Mi tajpis "Infanoj kiel hundidoj kaj katidoj."-n :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChuckBaggett

I persist in failing to put the n on direct objects.

"Young children are like puppies and kittens."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2676

That would be "estas kiel". Very different sense of the English word "like".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hellomidnight

If you wanted to say a female kitten, would you say katidino or katinido? Which suffix goes first?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EranWhetst

Katinido= An offspring of a female cat Katidino= A female offspring of a cat

That's how i understand it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kiki_Michaels

I'm pretty sure it would be katinido. Your base word for a female cat would automatically start as katino, so you'd be inserting a suffix from then on.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Latcarf

I would rather say "katidino", ie a baby cat who moreover is female. For me "katinido" would denote a baby of a female cat, which could be a male kitten.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jamthom8

Doesn't the mere existence of a kitten imply that it is a baby of both a female and a male cat?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Latcarf

Yes, exactly, that’s why I don’t think "katinido" makes much sense because it means "baby of a female cat" which is the same thing as "katido".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jamthom8

Yeah I totally misread what you said.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Migranto

Crud, I'm getting confused on the direct object thing. I used "hundidoj" and "katidoj" because liking something doesn't really seem like an action, per se. Which verbs, other than estas, will NOT require the direct object -n ending?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EranWhetst

None. "esti" is the only active verb that does not require a direct object ending (passive verbs cannot describe an action that is made on someone). All other verbs require this ending, unless there is a preposition between the verb and the object (which makes it an indirect object) for example: "Mi vidas la domoN" "Mi eliras EL la domo" Although, in some cases there is a preposition but it is still a direct object, for example: "Mi eniras EN la domoN" (I walk INTO the house) But it does not necessarily depend on the preposition itself, it is more dependent of the use of it, for example: "Mi iras EN la parko" (I walk IN the park) Here 'en' is used as 'in' and in the previous example it was used as 'into'.

You can read more about the '-n' suffix and do some exercises about it here: http://eo.lernu.net/lernado/gramatiko/konciza/objekto.php This is a great site, and I think that it is much better for beginning learning Esperanto, it explains the basics much better and it has a forum and public chat room and private helpers.

Hope that helped!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EranWhetst

Here you can find more explanations about it and also some exercises about prepositions and in which of them you use the '-n' suffix: http://eo.lernu.net/lernado/gramatiko/konciza/prepozicioj.php


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2676

If it's a transitive verb, it takes a direct object. Not all active verbs are transitive. Also, "active" is a grammatical category and shouldn't be confused with actual activity. (Just like how linguists say "noun class" instead of "grammatical gender" because grammatical gender has nothing to do with biological sex. It's from "genera", meaning type/kind/category.)

"Children like." Okay, what do they like? "Like" in this sense is a transitive verb and needs a direct object. "Children like baby animals."

"To be" is not an active verb at all, but a stative verb (also called a linking verb or a copula). It describes the state of something. It's like a great big equals sign. It does not take a direct object but rather a subject complement.

Some English verbs can be active or stative depending on how they're used.

Tom looks out the window. (active)
Tom looks tired. (stative)

In short, if the predicate reflects upon the subject, then you're probably dealing with a stative verb.

Additionally, Esperanto does not use the accusative (direct object) if a noun phrase is the object of a preposition (because that makes it an indirect object).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emmett705338

kio estas pli ofta: geknaboj aux infanoj? mi pensas ke 'geknaboj' konvenas pli en Esperanto, ne?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MValletta

"Hundidojn kaj katidojn geinfanoj ŝatas." seem like it should be a possible translation for "Children like puppies and kittens ." Is it because we were not instructed to note that children of both genders like them?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2676

infano is already gender-neutral, I believe. Thus geinfanoj would be putting perhaps too fine a point on it.

Learn Esperanto in just 5 minutes a day. For free.