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  5. "La koko estas besto kaj viva…

"La koko estas besto kaj vivas."

Translation:The chicken is an animal and lives.

May 30, 2015

92 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ben-powell

Kapitano Evidenta

June 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/craaash80

I was just wondering how you said it in Esperanto :D

December 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Euglot

It lives! It lives! Ahahahaha! XD

June 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dagguet

that moment when you start a new lesson and duolingo gives you crazy sentences.

January 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrendanMajkel

Ĝi vivas! Ĝi vivas! :)

March 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Novantico

Ĉu estas mi la sola homon, ke pensas la frazo sonas stranga en la angla?

Am I the only person that thinks the sentence sounds strange in English?

(please forgive/correct any grammatical mistakes in Eo)

June 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/altindiefanboy

*Ĉu mi estas la sola homo, kiu pensas ke la frazo sonas stranga en la angla?

The phrase is a little strange when translated word for word into English. A translation that sounds more natural is "La koko estas besto, kaj ĝi vivas." or "The chicken is an animal, and it lives."

July 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/memlerninto

Shouldn't it be "sonas strange", not "sonas stranga"?

June 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2060

This is actually a good question, since I've seen evidence that Esperanto often handles predicate adjectives differently than English does.

In English, "sounds" can be an active verb or a stative verb, depending on how it's being used. So something can sound strangely, meaning it's giving off a sound in an unusual manner, or it can sound strange, meaning that "strange" is describing the thing in question. You can feel bad, in which case you're describing the state of your health or emotions, or you can feel badly, in which case you're saying that your sense of touch is impaired.

But I've seen English sentences that are clearly using a stative verb and predicate adjective be translated into Esperanto using the adverb form.

June 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/memlerninto

In both cases, from my experience with Esperanto (and Ido), "to feel bad" and "to feel badly" would translate as "mi sentas malbone"; however, with the former, I would add "min" to clarify. Note that Zamenhof used both the adjective and the adverb for the predicate, for example see http://vortaro.net/#sin%20senti

June 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/craigmeu

No, I too think it somewhat strange.

March 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Imthebestlearner

no you aren't

November 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MountainAsh2

No, the sentence does sound strange. The problem is that it does not use parallelism, that is, they describe the rooster as being a noun and then as being an adjective (alive), rather than using two adjectives or two nouns.

June 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2060

vivas is a verb, not an adjective.
The chicken [is an animal] and [lives/is-alive].
Not:
The chicken is [an animal] and [alive].

But even if it were an adjective, it does not violate parallelism, because you certainly can say the second one, with the "is" covering both "an animal" and "alive".

June 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MountainAsh2

Thank you for correcting me; but still "is an animal" is a predicate with a verb and an object, while "lives/is alive" is a predicate consisting of a verb ("is" in the latter is being used as part of a verb, not as a transitive verb). I believe that this does violate parallelism.

June 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2060

Take another look at my brackets.

In the first example, there are two verb phrases headed by the subject.

In the second example, there are two complements headed by the verb.

June 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annodamydal

Would "and is alive" work too?

June 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lingoingo

Yes

June 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

Suggest it.

June 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Manuel_Lujan

I don't think so. The meaning it conveys may be the same, but that's a different structure; we're using the verb 'live',' not the adjective 'alive'; for educational purposes, I wouldn't accept it.

October 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrozenArrow73

yes that works. this sentence makes no sense in any language so best not worry about it too much.

July 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PrauaeBoleti

Could I say, "The chicken is an animal and it lives"?

May 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis_Domingos

Yes, because that's English - Esperanto doesn't require repetition of personal pronouns when talking about the same subject.

May 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmbertoRosa

Nor does Esperanto prohibit it. You could use "si" to make it more clear, but since there is no other "it" to be considered in that context, "gxi" is also fine. If the gender of the "koko" is known (or assumed), one could also use "sxi" to indicate female, "hi" to indicate male, or "li" to indicate epecine/male third person. And yes, chickens are people too. LOL!

August 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pampelius

hi? I thought he was li?

February 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2060

Yeah. I think they just made a typo.

February 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Essexmcintosh

i think he is using one of the gender reforms, "it" in some languages (i think EO included) can be a bit dehumanizing, so there are occasional pushes to add either masculine suffixes and pronouns, or a neutral third person, sxli is an example of the latter

June 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Louis369947

You can't use "si" as the subject of a sentence. It needs a subject to reference and that cannot be itself.

August 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

That's what I wrote, & I got docked for using "it" I contested the answer.

May 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThatOneDoge

I didn't even say it.

April 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/P_Azul

Yes, you can say that in English. It's not a correct translation of the Esperanto sentence, though.

November 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vipassana75

"The cock is an animal and lives." is wrong?

June 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Migranto

Well, no, but in English, "cock" is rarely used for that meaning...

June 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarylWilliams1

Rarely? Been afraid to talk in this chat thingy because I see so many people get attacked for next to nothing, but seriously, I've never seen an English Bible that called it a rooster, and plenty of English speakers have grown up learning "Bible English". In fact, I went to a catholic high school, and certain nuns there made a point of insisting that words like "cock", "ass", and "❤❤❤❤❤" were animal names, and not to be used in any other way. I've also heard quite a few more farmers call it a cock than a rooster... and who would be talking about them more than farmers?

It is all rather confusing thought, how everything seems to be male without that "in" suffix, except for chickens and cows and professionals... and any other exceptions I haven't figured out yet. Inanimate objects maybe? Dolls? Puppets? How's a person supposed to guess?

August 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Louis369947

Some nouns are masculine and a few are feminine, but the large majority is neuter.

May 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2060

Esperanto does not have grammatical gender. If a noun has the -in- affix, that means the person or animal it is referring to is female.

May 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Louis369947

And without that affix, it is of unspecified gender, not male. A language does not need grammatical gender for its nouns to have masculine or feminine meaning. In Esperanto, some nouns refer to masculine beings, a few to feminine beings, but the large majority leave the gender unspecified.

May 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2060

A language does not need grammatical gender for its nouns to have masculine or feminine meaning.

This is true. However, that is a very different thing from saying that nouns are masculine or feminine, which refers to grammatical gender.

May 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis_Domingos

That made me laugh :) I think "rooster" would have been a better compromise for "male fowl". "The cock" can be... well... misleading :P

June 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davgwynne

Only in American would you use "Rooster" for a cockerel. In UK English "cock" would be more likely. It is very common for a male bird to be called a cock bird.

August 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hayden_Watson

Cock is a male chicken, A male chicken is Esperanto would have the male prefix, so virkoko

August 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/drakovyrn

The inconsistency kills me.

October 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Margita_S

Isn't chicken specifically hen's/rooster's/cock's offspring? I am not native English speaker, but isn't "The hen is an animal and lives" also correct? (or is in english hen only female ?

September 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2060

"Chicken" is the name of the species and what we call the animal generically. "Chick" is the young. "Hen" is the female. "Rooster" is the male.

September 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Margita_S

Thank you very much for this. It's really helpful

September 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeSanMartin

I looked up koko and it was rooster or cock

kokido is defined as chicken

Sorry, as I progress in lessons I just want to be exact. This confuses me.

April 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davgwynne

Isn't kokido a chick? I think you meant to write kokino.

April 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phitheta

The lesson at the beginning says that "-in" is for female animals, "vir-" for male animals, and "-id" for offspring/young/child animals.

So, in English, "kokido" is "chick", "virkoko" is "rooster" or "cock", and "kokino" would be "hen"

October 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2060

Not just animals:
viro = man
virino = woman
knabo = boy
knabino = girl
avo = grandfather
avino = grandmother
onklo = uncle
onklino = aunt
etc...

October 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MosesPeris

Esperanto is saying that the chicken is not an inanimate object for our delight to eat, it as feelings.

December 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eldecee

Ĉu "a beast" ne taŭgas ĉi tie? (La angla ne estas mia gepatra lingvo!)

June 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2060

animal = dier
beast = beest

June 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kog12

Not a very good English sentence

May 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2060

It doesn't have to be. These lessons are all about grammar and vocabulary. As long as it's grammatical, it doesn't have to make sense.

May 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KingOdiny

But how long?

November 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eddygp

Kokino vs koko, anyone?

June 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Novantico

Kokino is a specifically female chicken. Koko is just a chicken in general.

June 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eddygp

Kokicxo is therefore a rooster, as far as I know?

June 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaizinM

Virkoko is the word generally used. The -iĉo suffix for male things, while it has a small following, is not standard Esperanto.

August 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeoName

If you go that route, it would be kokiĉo

July 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KiwiCymraeg

If "cock" is accepted as correct, why not "cockerel"?

August 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciaJH

Too specific, I think -- this really means "chicken" in general, but a cockerel is "a rooster under a year in age," per Wikipedia.

October 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2060

The Esperanto team didn't think of it? Suggest it next time it comes up.

August 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oreothegizz

La angla, what specifies beast being a creature?

September 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davgwynne

All creatures are beasts and all animals are creatures.

In English (at least UK English) the words “beast’, “animal” and “creature” are equivalent.

I have just checked my copy of Webster’s dictionary, and “beast” includes both vertebrate and invertebrate creatures. So, it seems to apply in US English too.

I just reported the “beast” translation as missing again, but since most people that I know seem to use “beast” to mean tetrapod then I won’t be surprised if it isn’t corrected.

November 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kayzels

Can "vivas" be used to mean "live" as in "live in the house?" Mi vivas en la domon?

January 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2060

No, that would be loĝi, cognate with "lodge".

Vivi is literally "to live, to be alive".
Loĝi is "to lodge, to reside, to dwell".

January 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JakharrVin

And here I thought they were tumbleweeds with legs.

February 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruinemacil

Why couldn't it be a beast?

July 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davgwynne

It could. In English: beast=animal=creature. This is also true in American English according to Webster.

April 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yemum1

Why did I misread it as "the chicken is the best and long live it"?

November 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mickyy5

Fritita koko ne estas vivas

January 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2060

You can't have two conjugated verbs in a row like that. Besides, vivas means is alive, so fritita kokaĵo ne vivas is all you need to say.

January 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pitaahio

"ne estas viva" would also work, I suppose? Technically?

April 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2060

Theoretically, but that depends on how strict the translation needs to be.

April 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kiriharakyouhei1

AVA

February 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hugglesaim

The chicken is ALIVE!!! They will be telling us its name is Flash Gordon and wants to save several planets next!

February 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GogenBulbose

Why "besto"? Are some similar words among european languages?

March 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/P_Azul

It's related to Biest, beast, beest, bist, bèsta, bestie, bête, besta, bestia. bæst, best, etc. of various Indogermanic languages, all referring to an animal, though in some cases with a negative association.

November 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2060

Yes. The various European languages are all related to each other more or less distantly (except Basque, which is an orphan).

April 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brownin329

I wanted to put "The chicken is an animal and lives," but that made absolutely no sense.

April 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/P_Azul

La koko estas besto kaj ĝi vivas. The verbs are not of the same kind, thus they can't combine without each having a subject.

November 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Argyle11

Why such a weird sentence? And not duo weird but borhersomely weird.

December 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/QueenOfKitKats

Off it is an animal bruhhhhhhhh. d

February 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Inav3v3

It seems like this would translate to, "The chicken is a living animal" ...?

April 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2060

No, that would be closer to "La koko estas vivanta besto".

April 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HokonoSerejdo

It would be helpful, just sometimes, if whoever made this course actually knew English, and not just Esperanto.

August 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spacekookie

...for now /o\

June 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MisterShivers

The chicken is an animal and is living. how is this not correct?

July 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2060

That's a valid interpretation, just not one the course contributors thought to put in the database. Flag it and report "My answer should be accepted" next time this comes around.

July 17, 2019
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