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"She starts a new course."

Translation:Ella comienza un nuevo curso.

3 years ago

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/cazort
cazort
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My first thought was to write "un curso nuevo" and it accepted this...but...is there any difference in feel, connotation, or emphasis between the two word orders?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

"Nuevo" after the noun means it newly exists. "Nuevo" before means that it is newly experienced. (E.g. a book that was just published vs. one you're reading for the first time)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PenuelX

So I think I can describe your comment as not only useful information, but also "nueva informacion nueva!"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/norma0044

Thank you so much for that explanation. Clear and concise. Estupendo!

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/irene121212

Whats the difference please between Empieza and Comienzo.?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElectricWeasel

Empieza means to start, comienza means to begin

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ignatznkrazy
ignatznkrazy
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But aren't those synonyms in English. I don't think the brand of American English that I speak differentiates between starting and beginning.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElectricWeasel

Yes they are, I am not sure why I said that but yes they are both interchangeable

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PenuelX

Can comenzar also mean to commence?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElectricWeasel

Comenzar means to commence yes

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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NOTA: comienzo, comienzas, comienza, comenzamos, comenzáis, comienzan (presente)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bibliophilea

Comenzar vs. empezar? Do they mean exactly the same thing? Are there sublte differences between them?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/omjeremy

Ruta should be allowed for course.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isaiah718543

This sentence sounds like it's taking about an educational course. Ruta would work if it were a physical route you were traveling.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melarish
MelarishPlus
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Can a "clase" not mean a course like it does in English?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/omjeremy

Clase means class, not course.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kimmykist

Does rumba not also mean course?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/omjeremy

It's rumbo not rumba. Rumba isn't a spanish word. Rumbo can be used for course.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrandonD15

Actually "rumba" is a dance started in Cuba of African Spanish orgins.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mortisimago
mortisimago
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I don't know, but I suspect rumba is for course in life and curso is for course of study

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charlie6361

My mistake. Ignore previous post

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/samgustafs1

Is there a difference between start and begin

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

As English verbs? Not really. The only exception I can think of is that "start" can mean to initiate something's motion (e.g. to start an engine), but "begin" doesn't really have this sense.

"Start" can also be a noun, whereas the corresponding noun form of "to begin" is "beginning."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ryan329177

Why is the adjective in front of the noun?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

Certain adjectives can be put before nouns in Spanish to shade their meaning. In this case, "curso nuevo" would have meant that the course newly existed, while "nuevo curso" means that it was newly experienced. That is, it was new to her.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ryan329177

Is there a rule of thumb as to what adjectives can do this?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

The main rule of thumb is that adjectives showing either appreciation or expected qualities can be put before the noun to intensify their meaning. E.g. la buena mujer, la hermosa vista, el plano lago.

Changing meaning more qualitatively is just a thing about certain adjectives that you have to remember. There's a good list here: http://spanish.about.com/od/adjectives/a/adjective_placement.htm

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ryan329177

¡Muchas gracias, mi amigo!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UnaGranSenora

Why was "Su comienza un nuevo curso" wrong? 'Su' can be his/her correct?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

"Su" is possessive: his/her, not he/she.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/valerie.ve2

Why is "nueva" wrong?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

It needs to match gender with the thing that is being described as new, which is the masculine "curso."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Metaxia17
Metaxia17
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Ella conuencia un nuevo curso

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TallulahSc

Didnt accept empieza

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robin408483

I had the opposite problem. When I used comienzo it was not accepted even though previously in same lesson it had used it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isaiah718543

That would be because it's not the correct conjugation for this sentence. "comienzo" is the I form in present tense. "comenzó" would be she/he/it/you (formal) in past tense. Similar though.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olgaz007

Didn't accept "ella empieza una nueva pista"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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I am not sure how you can "start" a racetrack. Well, you could start building one in Track Mania or something. :D

11 months ago