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"Mi volas iri hejmen."

Translation:I want to go home.

3 years ago

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/msalazarmassaro

What is the diffrence between: "Mi volas iri hejmen" "Mi volas iri hejmon"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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I'm not certain that I'm the better guy, but I'll attempt this.

Hejmen is an adverb with a directional indicator on it. "You want to go homeward". Hejmon is a noun in the direct object. "You want to go a home." The sentence would need something to indicate whose, or what kind of, home you want to go to.

I hope that helps a bit.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JakeH1
JakeH1
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That helped a lot, thanks

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lazar.ljubenovic
lazar.ljubenovic
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Hejmo is a more literal meaning of home, as in house. Hejme means home in phrases like "Come back home", "I'm home", etc.

I think that "Mi volas iri hejmon" is not grammatically correct, because hejmo is not a direct object, hence you can't attach -n to make it accusative case. But take it with a grain of salt, I'm a beginner myself! Let's wait for someone else to clear it up better.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/randomgang
randomgang
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I think that way would be more like "Mi volas iri al hejmo" but I am also a beginner. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/msalazarmassaro

The first part made sense, i can see the difference between a physical home and an ideological home. However, the sentence in english could mean it both ways.

the second paragraph i really dont get it, and as you say, lets wait for a beter guy

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BradfordBowman

My understanding is that prepositions may be replaced by the accusative case, so that "Mi volas iri hejmon" is equivalent to "Mi volas iri al hejmo" even though hejmo would not otherwise properly be a direct object in that sentence (because iri is not a transitive verb).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joffysloffy

In the sentence “Mi volas iri hejmon” (which is grammatically correct) “hejmo” is not a direct object and the accusative case is used here to indicate movement towards something, not to indicate a direct object (like mentioned, iri is an intransitive verb). It is also correct to say “Mi volas iri al hejmo”.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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In English we say "I want to go home" wherein "home" can be the hotel/campsite where one is currently sleeping, or it can mean "home", a starting place, or "home" the place where I reside when I'm not traveling. By making "home" an adverb Esperanto says "home = place where I reside…"

Some of you may be trying to make "hejme" into "homely", a no longer positive descriptive word, usually applied to females. Don't. There are other words for that. (& I won't mention any of them here, because I do TRY to be a gentleman)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/traevoli
traevoli
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BradfordBowman is technically right. In older texts you'll see phrases like "Mi iras Parizon" as a replacement for "Mi iras al Parizo". But "Mi iras Parizen" is the modern style and what you'll almost always hear today.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/meenyo
meenyo
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Can somebody explain why an adverb like "hejme", has an ending for an object? So, what's the differences between, "Mi volas iri hejme" and this sentence? Dankon!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joffysloffy

The accusative case here is not used to indicate an object, but to indicate direction. Here are some other examples where you use the directional -n with adverbs:
Mi staras antaŭ ĉiuj. = I'm standing in front of everyone.
Mi staras antaŭe. = I am standing at the font.
Mi iras antaŭen. = I walk forward. (direction of ‘to the front’, so -n)

Similarly:
Mi estas hejme. = I am home.
Mi iras hejmen. = I am going home. (in the direction of home, so -n)

Consequently, the sentence ‘Mi iras hejme’ sounds strange, but you would use the meaning of ‘iras’ as ‘to walk’ and so it can mean that you are walking home, as in, you're inside your home and there you are walking about.

Compare:
Mi saltas sur la tablon. = I jump onto the table. (You jump from somewhere else onto the table.)
Mi saltas sur la tablo. = I jump on the table. (You're on the table and jumping up and down.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/meenyo
meenyo
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Dankon for your explanation! I'm not a native English speaker so I'm trying to understand the full concept here. It's because I've learnt about accusative case in another language and it's a strict rule so it doesn't make any sense to me, because they're a different part of speech.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joffysloffy

Nedankinde :).
I'm not a native English speaker myself either, and that wouldn't help much, as English lacks the concept of the accusative case almost entirely (except in personal pronouns). Indeed, in the sentences above I had to use different constructions or prepositions to indicate what I meant, whereas in Esperanto a simple adverb or accusative was used.
The accusative case in Esperanto is also a strict rule though. It is just used for several different things. (In German is the same concept of a directional accusative case.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/meenyo
meenyo
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Yup, I've learnt German too back in my SHS, so when I read about how the adverb in Esperanto can be changed into accusative case, it just blows my mind. Plezuro! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joffysloffy

Ah, neat! I don't know what SHS is though, but I learned a little German in high school (as well?). I don't know much of it anymore though :s.
Haha, yes, Esperanto is wild like that! It's also cool how you can turn prepositions into adverbs like before!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/meenyo
meenyo
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SHS is an abbreviation for Senior High School. We use this term in our country. Yup, Esperanto is quite tricky, I thought that it's following the traditional grammar pattern, but sadly don't. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joffysloffy

Aha, I see!
Well, mostly it follows normal grammar patterns, but there are all these fancy extensions that simplify (rather compactify) a lot of sentences.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/meenyo
meenyo
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Yeah. Maybe there'll be simplified version of this language? :) Ido has been trying to simplify Esperanto, but it doesn't last long.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joffysloffy

No! Esperanto is a very simple language compared to pretty much every language. The little things like the aforementioned make Esperanto beautiful and elegant. One of the brilliant things of Esperanto is, in my opinion, the very simple -j for plurals, which Ido messes up, yielding ambiguous word endings: a word ending in an -i is either plural or an infinitive; that's dumb.
All these ‘complications’ allow one to express a lot of little nuances that other languages lack, while still keeping the language relatively simple. So simplifying Esperanto is really superfluous and would probably screw up a lot of the expressibilities and nuances.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/traevoli
traevoli
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If you scroll up you will see this has already been explained.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/meenyo
meenyo
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Ah, I see. Dankon!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cosmomica
Cosmomica
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Forrest, mi volas iri hejmen.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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Vivo estas kiel skatolo da ĉokoladaĵoj

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/trucktiger
trucktiger
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Contender for favourite audio, he sounds like a sad child :( A+ acting skills from the voice guy, really helps with context and remembering the words

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Raztastic
Raztastic
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  • frapetas ŝuoj kune -
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lrhale
lrhale
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Didn't accept "I wanna go home" :C

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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Aside from the incorrect grammar…

Meh! Report it anyways.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joffysloffy

Why is that grammatically incorrect? The word ‘wanna’ is perfectly acceptable, albeit very informal. It's in my Oxford dictionary.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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Really? I always considered it vernacular, and just a bit sloppy (though if you actually hear my speech you'd recognize that that is not intended as an insult to the word) The term is a slurred together form of two perfectly appropriate words ("want to") but is not, as far as I know, taught in English classes anywhere.

Oxford, eh? Maybe Irhale really should report it then. Does your dictionary include innit? Same sort of thing as wanna but built from "isn't it."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joffysloffy

Yea. It probably has been adopted because it's so wide spread.

As a matter of fact it does contain innit! That seems particularly vernacular to me, as you don't really hear it much, do you?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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Ain't that the truth. ;)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KaptianKaos8
KaptianKaos8
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ain't it that you musta be using summor korekt gramer in a formul sens

Meh! As FredCapp said, report it anyways.

1 year ago