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  5. "Buksa er altfor lang."

"Buksa er altfor lang."

Translation:The pants are much too long.

May 30, 2015

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

I like how you make sure that we learn the difference between to and too in English, too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gjordetbra

I should like to say such a phrase as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael17867

I second this notion!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvilCherub1

I agree with you in regard of this statement!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bronzdragon

Is "alt for" also acceptable? My Norwegian friend was confused about how this was a single word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TCAC2

Although a lot of native Norwegians make that mistake, "alt for" isn't correct in this case. "Alt for" and "altfor" have two different meanings. "Alt for" literally means "all for", while "altfor" means "way too"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jnis418148

Can you just ttanslate this to "the pants are too long?" Or is the "way" necessary?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

"Way", or similar, is necessary.

for = too
altfor = all too, way too, far too, altogether too, much too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stig_Greybarry

you are translating the prefix "alt" too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chaoticellum

Is "pants" meant as in British English or in American English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MargretAndersen

Underbukser are what you wear under your pants in American or the Norwegian word for pants in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ag3n7_z3r0

American. Another exercise had us translate it from trousers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FockeWulfF

I put "... Are too much", the correction said "... Much too"... I always thought it was "too much"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

You can say "too much" with a noun after it which gives the entire quantity as in "too much food", but when you have an adjective after it, this changes. You are describing "how long" which is "much too long". You could say "He is going much too fast." or "He has too much speed".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ctougas01

Hoou! Tusen takk! It's the first time I ever heard of this in years!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silverthornfire

What a joy! Usually they are too short!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvandroZafalon

"The pants" (plural) should not be "buksene"? While "Buksa" would be "The pant"? Can somenone explain?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

"Pants" is a tricky one, because they originally came in two pieces; one for each leg.

Of course they're now stitched together, forming a single garment, but it's still referred to as "pants" or "a pair of pants" in English.

In Norwegian you have the option of doing the same thing, using 'buksene' for a single pair of pants, but it's also common to use the "true" singular 'buksen' or 'buksa'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvandroZafalon

Oh now I understand ! Tusen takk


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Bare hyggelig!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ.Dennis

Do you have a reference for pants originally coming in two pieces? I haven't been able to find one and I think it's a folk etymology.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heithr

Is there a difference between buksa and buksen in looks? Is one a woman's pant and one a man's? Or is it just that the word can have either masculine or feminine endings?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gjordetbra

There's no literal difference in what the words describe; it's just a difference between feminine and masculine nouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TillyShadb

Buksa is trousers in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

Or pants, yes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

"Trousers" in British English and "pants" in American English, but "pants" in British English means "panties" or "underwear" in American English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

Two countries divided by a common language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tiny_Giants

to be fair, most people in the UK don't say "pants" people generally just say "underwear". It's one of those things particularly Americans associate with us (like saying "bloody" all the time) that isn't true in most cases.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

You're bloody well right about that. ;-D

And let's not talk about napkins…


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Thank you! I did not pay attention to the way that seemed. I didn't associate this with all British speakers, but some British speakers have complained about this on Duolingo and that is where I learned about this. My mistake was to refer to "The British" (people) and I am changing the statement to just include the facts.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UtkarshSyng

I put "lange". Isn't "buksa" plural here? :-(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

It's the definite singular, with the definite plural being "buksene".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

Sam, du har laget bukser mine altfor lange.

(det er en veldig gammel sang)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaeskee

Can't we say that altfor means "too" or "way too" instead of translating this as "much too" because it sounds off. It is possible to say it like this yes but it is not correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

"Altfor" doesn't mean "too", that's just "for".

"Far too", "way too", "all too", "altogether too" and "entirely too" are all accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALBERT202562

I guess that trousers are the same as pants aren't they?

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