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  5. "Kokken klipper kjøttet med e…

"Kokken klipper kjøttet med en saks."

Translation:The cook is cutting the meat with scissors.

May 30, 2015

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zek256
  • 1294

sounds like a health code violation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sgt.Burden

Come to think of it, you very often use scissors to cut chicken wings and drumsticks off a whole chicken.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Candidandelion

I always use scissors to cut up raw chicken or bacon.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arnorkr

"The chef de cuisine" was a bit too fancy translation of "kokken".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Not every cook is a chef de cuisine. "Kjøkkensjef" would be a closer translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kwebauw

What's the difference between "å skjære" and "å klippe"? Are both synonyms or is there a clear difference between them?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TCAC2

"Å skjære" means to cut something with a knife. "Å klippe" means to cut something with scissors.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stigjohan

Or, in the case of "klippe gresset", with a lawn mower.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LBoksha

Interesting to see Norwegian has two words for this, while German and English both only have one, while Dutch makes the exact same distinction as Norwegian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hrafnunga

English does have two, it's just that cut can be used for both meanings. We also have "clip" for scissors and grass clippings from lawn mowing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

German has both ‚schneiden‘=”to cut [in general]” and ‚scheren‘=“to shear | to cut with scissors”, though the latter term is mostly specialized for fur, as is the English “to shear”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LBoksha

Funnily enough, the word "scheren" also exists in Dutch (though the "ch" is pronounced as the infamous throaty Dutch G), which could also be used to refer to shearing sheep, but it's normally used to mean "to shave"/"rasieren". So many subtle differences. :-D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mprdo

Adreas, Good point! In Am Eng, the larger scissors used in a kitchen such as for cutting out rib sections on poultry or dividing the backs and breasts into smaller pieces are called "kitchen shears". Likewise, those for trimming plants, such as roses, are called "pruning shears". Maybe in Bokmal, there is a different word for those heavier duty variants. 12Jul17


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ramaskrik

Slovak, which roots from somewhere else entirely (it is a Slavic language) also makes this distinction.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neemel

Estonian, with even more remote roots, does not ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ani_Jane

Why does 'med en saks' not translate as 'with a scissors'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

'Scissors' only exists as a plural noun in English, so it doesn't play well with the singular article 'a'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ani_Jane

Oh! Lol, I have always said 'a scissors', maybe I need to take the English for Native Speaking Idiots course after this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Hehe, I know how you feel! I've been learning a worrying amount of Norwegian while making this course. Don't tell anyone... ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luke_5.1991

Man, I thought I was the only one!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elilla.b

It means that English is changing, and you're at the forefront of the updated version ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SinaNekAkh

This should translate to 'a scissor'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sapiophia

'A scissor' is wrong too. It's a pair of 'scissors' (as in two blades). Like trousers, or pants, because there are two parts to them.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_plurals#Plurals_without_singulars


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SinaNekAkh

Uh huh, so I have been saying it wrong. Shouldn't it then be 'with scissors' without the article? Or 'with a pair of scissors'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sapiophia

Yes, it can be either :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Myan9

Living for the alliteration


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kubelnaby

i was wondering... i mean, not strictly language related, but does someone actually cut the meat with scissors or is this one of those purposely weird sentences of duolingo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aleyzee

In another app I saw Jeg Kutter. KUTT is the general act?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JudithLeeP

In other questions where scissors was used the answer was a pair of scissors but in this sentence you say you said I was wrong to use a 'pair of'. Actually I had wanted to use only the word 'scissors' although I would rather have only used 'scissors'. When you marked me wrong in the other cases when I only used 'scissors', I assumed you used 'a pair' in all cases. So someone tell me why I was wrong in all cases.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ron459389

kind of confusing, one might trim meat with scissors but one would generally use a knife to cut it

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