"Hoe kom ik in de stad?"

Translation:How do I get to the city?

3 years ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Str8OuttaBlighty
  • 14
  • 10
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3

Why has "How do I get into town?" not been accepted? This is definitely how many native English speakers would pose this question.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2200Lucia60
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 16
  • 1375

Hi Karen, "How do I get TO the city?" means: l am at a certain distance from the city, in full country land, and I wonder how (which bus/train I need?) I go to the city. "How do I get INTO the city?" Means: I am near, in the suburb of the city and I am asking how to get in the center. And that one is not the theme of the Dutch sentence.. Hope others confirm my interpretation... Bye Karen Stra8Out... Lu.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Str8OuttaBlighty
  • 14
  • 10
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3

Thanks Lu, you illustrate the difference between the two situations well, but I'm still not sure which situation the given Dutch phrase refers to, or if it could be used in both cicumstances... In which case, I would think that "How do I get into town?" should also be accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2200Lucia60
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 16
  • 1375

Yes Karen, I agree with you that the situation coming from the Dutch sentence isn't clear at all and by consequence your version "How do I get into town" should be accepted too! When I meet that exercise in the future, I will test your answer and in case of rejection, I am going to report it! Thank you Karen. See you later, Lu

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/minichelonia

is there a reason why "How am I coming to the city?" isn't accepted? I know its not the same meaning as the suggested translation, but I wouldve thought it would be correct.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rhhpk
  • 17
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 6

It's hard to imagine a situation where you would say that.
"How am I coming to the city?" isn't a question asking for directions, but more a kind of surprise that you're coming to the city rather than where you wanted to go - sort of "how did I end up here?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/minichelonia

By what means of transport will I be able to come to the city?

is the meaning I had in mind

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rhhpk
  • 17
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 6

Yes, the answer given here could mean that as well.

You could use your suggestion and it might be understood as which bus/train etc. to take or as asking for directions, but a native English speaker would never use it in that context - as I said, it's hard to imagine a situation where a native English speaker would say that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/minichelonia

thankyou for the feedback. (I am a native english speaker btw)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Atcovi

so why no "naar" for "in"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2200Lucia60
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 16
  • 1375

Hi Actovi. It can be said, but "❤❤❤ kom ik naar de stad" sounds less natural to me than "❤❤❤ ga ik naar de stad" However "❤❤❤ kom ik in de stad" willing to know if there are buses to bring you into the town, is a perfect way to ask it, expressing in fact the idea to go INTO a determined place. Cheers.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2200Lucia60
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 16
  • 1375

"How do I get down town? " , is that another possible translation? Native English speakers, explain. Thanks! Lu

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis_Domingos
  • 18
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 2

A downtown area is only a part of a city, and that's translated in Dutch as "de binnenstad" (inner city), "het stadscentrum" (the city center), or "de zakendistrict" (if you're talking about the central business district of a given city).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2200Lucia60
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 16
  • 1375

Hi Luis, the explanation to give was not so much but you' ve been complete and clear. Thank you very much. I go on studying, as a lot of wonderful people is helping me. Best wishes, Lu

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wei-Da
Plus
  • 23
  • 19
  • 9
  • 24

❤❤❤ ga ik toe de stad? Does this sentence have the same meaning with the above one?

Also, can I directly replace kom with ga in this one?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2200Lucia60
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 16
  • 1375

Hi Wei-Da. First of all, when to use "komen" or "gaan" is a bit a delicate question. Generally you say " Ik kom naar jou (toe)" in pure Dutch, while "Ik GA naar jou (toe)" is probably more Flemish Dutch.But I'm not totally sure of that. As I know, the "return" is indicated with "gaan", willing to say KOMEN en GAAN, in English literally TO COME and TO COME BACK. Second. Your given alternative sentence is not correct. However, if you insist in using " GA", you must write: " ❤❤❤ GA Ik NAAR de stad (toe)?To end, this: ❤❤❤ KOM IK IN DE STAD?❤❤❤ KOM IK DAAR?❤❤❤ GA IK DAAR NAAR TOE? ❤❤❤ KAN IK DE STAD BEREIKEN? whether somebody talks more Flemish or 'real' Dutch... NONE of these sentences sound bad, however... Good luck in study and life! Lu.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wei-Da
Plus
  • 23
  • 19
  • 9
  • 24

Thanks a lot. Now I know that "kom" and "gaan" is Dutch have more subtle meanings than "come and go" have in English. For beginners like me I think it's easily confused as we tend to translate directly from English to Dutch.

Your answer has been very helpful

Best, Da

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2200Lucia60
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 16
  • 1375

Hi Da. You wrote [Now I know that "kom" and "gaan" is... ], corrected it becomes [...that "komEN" (infinitive) and "gaan"...]. It will always be a pleasure to help you, IF I can... Ever the best, Lu

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dhalphir

"How do I get into the town?" should be accepted here, unless I'm badly wrong.

1 year ago
Learn Dutch in just 5 minutes a day. For free.