"Frimærket er hundred år gammelt."

Translation:The stamp is a hundred years old.

May 30, 2015

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Mr.Keko
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I'm no native English speaker but just "is hundred" seems strange.

Isn't it better to say "a hundred" or "hundreds"?

May 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/NeilHutchi2
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It is totally incorrect to omit the indefinite article in front of 'hundred'.

August 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/TineSurel
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"hundred" er forkert, det hedder "hundrede år gammelt".

May 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/mads-lime
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Både 'hundred' og 'hundrede' er rigtige at sige :)

http://ordnet.dk/ddo/ordbog?query=100.

May 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/oldestguru
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in the Danish dictionary there is only "hundrede". "Hundred" in Danish is nowhere to be found outside duolingo

August 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ycUvuSap
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Is there an official "the Danish dictionary"? My impression was that Den danske ordbog is quite reliable.

March 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Maddog72

In English it should say postage stamp. There are other kinds of stamps.

June 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/christhroup
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Certainly in British English, "stamp" with no other qualifiers would normally refer to a postage stamp. Unless the context made it obviously something else (eg a teacher talking about using a stamp for marking schoolwork).

October 31, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/edalgas
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The same goes for American English.

May 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/juanikay

hey, duo, "a hundred years" is the same as "a century." why can't it be The stamp is a century old?

December 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/christhroup
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A century is a hundred years long, but I don't think many English speakers would use those terms interchangeably. "The stamp is a century old" sounds odd to my ears; although I would obviously understand what you mean.

December 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Isaac_Luna_
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It wouldn't sound weird to me at all. It's just that it deviates a little too much from the original sentence. If I remember correctly, the Danish word for "century" is "et århundred".

October 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/NeilHutchi2
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Just in my opinion, it departs too much from the original. To continue your argument, why not replace it with 'ten decades' or 'one thousand, two hundred months'? ;)

August 3, 2017
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