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"Estuve con una familia estadounidense."

Translation:I was with an American family.

5 years ago

64 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JMaibor
JMaibor
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@Gamerdude666. 100% correct. Actually, some Latin Americans get offended when North Americans think the term "American" is only for them. If you are from North America, Central America, or South America, you're American. The term "estadounidense" specifically refers to those from the U.S. It does not mean "American for them". There is no English word for "estadounidense". "American family " would translate like this: familia americana.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tamara377

in mexico we all just say "gringos/gringas" (among friends) because it's way easier for everyone to say, and that word also specifically refers to people from the USA.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bluemax89

Referring to a English speaking person as a "gringo" or a "gringa" is more offensive to English speaking people (including Canadians) than a resident of the United States referring to themselves as "American". It's downright derogatory. It's like calling a Mexican by one of the many derogatory terms used to describe them in English (I won't mention them here).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dougconnah

I think "gringo" has been going through a reverse pejoration for a while and seems to be used quite openly nowadays. There's a newspaper in Baja, the Gringo Gazette, a restaurant in Santiago, Café Melba, that's called a gringo breakfast paradise, Gordon Goodwin's Big Phat Band plays a terrific "Samba del Gringo," and on and on. Speaking personally, I'm not offended by it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/demsw

I was not in the least offended either. I call myself a gringa.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeyDC65

I will second what dougconnah said. Gringo is not, on its own, considered an offensive term and people should really not be offended by it. In fact, in some regions, it simply means foreigner and not necessarily specifically those from the U.S. In others, it does specifically refer to people from the U.S.

In either case, the word can be used offensively, just like can be done when referring to certain groups in English, by putting other negative words with it. However, simply calling somebody a gringo is no different than calling somebody Mexican, Peruvian, Chilean, etc.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Gringo/gringa is used by my very polite Peruvian teacher all the time. She'll admonish a poor Spanish pronunciation by saying. "You sound like a gringa/gringo. Now say it again en español."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/erennert20
erennert20
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Is she using it like a scolding? I am confused.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/meilonn
meilonn
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So does mine XD (except mine is Venezuelan).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/meilonn
meilonn
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I wouldn't consider it offensive either, mainly because I have a Latina friend who calls the rest of my group of friends gringos (mainly because we don't speak Spanish perfectly). But then again, she does it teasingly (and she doesn't speak perfect Spanish either XD).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGibbins

Being offended is a choice. Choose not to be.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lingo6128

Choose not to be harmed - and you won't feel harmed.

Don't feel harmed - and you haven't been.

Marcus Aurelius.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lubyleslie

I am a gringa living in Central America and here there is no derogatory or offensive element to it. I am not certain there ever was but do know that there really is none now.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ryancito_Sipo

In my experience most latinos in central and south america (except brazil) get offended by it; that is why i just use gringo when in spanish speaking countries in the Americas, even when talking in english. And my fiancee now says american when speaking in english to me and when in the U.S.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pneuros

Add to this the fact that Mexico is also a "United States" (Estados Unidos Mexicanos). It once made me very confused about how to tell people where I was from while traveling. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexico

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rajennagar

According to Wiki, this is where 'estadounidense' is derived:

"Spanish and the Brazilian dialects of the Portuguese, use terms derived from Estados Unidos, the translation of "United States" – estadounidense and estadunidense, respectively"

:)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AllenJesse

Go on with your junk

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stoneystone

In my experience the majority of the English speaking world is unaware of this 'We are all American' notion in South America and Mexico. I only found out about it by offending a Chilean with this exact context. If you say the word American for any situation in Australia, Britain, South Africa, NZ etc, they will automatically assume you are talking about someone of US origin. The Americas are so large that we tend to either use the actual country of origin i.e. He is Brazilian, She is Argentinian or just use He is South American if they are not from the US. It is a bit rude now I know/think about it but it is not common knowledge in these aforementioned places. Hope that helps a little... :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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That's what we get for naming the country after the continent. I'd suggest we call it Columbia, but then everyone will confuse it with Colombia, so maybe just Usona? And with the adjective being Usonan.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGarrick62

At the risk of diving too deep into politics, I'll add that the butcher Columbus already has far too many things carrying his name.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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You know, that's a good point. He was lucky to survive anyways.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Frank Lloyd Wright prefered the term Usonian (in fact, he claimed to have created it.) I think Benjamin Franklin wanted to call the nation Columbia.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaered
chaered
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Esperanto has Usono = USA (the country), usona = US-American (adjective), usonano = US-American (US citizen).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marihaley

I wrote "I stayed with an American family" and it was rejected even though "stayed" was one of the translations given for estuve on the drop down menu.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChayaDoppelt
ChayaDoppelt
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So did I. Can anyone explain why?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LilibethR

estadounidense = American but American does not mean estadounidense?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gamerdude666

Citizens of the USA call themselves American. They don't call themselves "United-States-ians". But if you think about it, people from Mexico are also Americans in the sense that they live in America/North American. So the word for "American that lives in Mexico" is mexican/mexicano in both languages. But Spanish speakers call "Americans that live in the USA" something that's essentially saying "United-States-ian" (as far as I can tell from my limited understanding of the spanish language), while people who live in the US call themselves simply "American" with the convention that people who live in America who aren't inhabitants the USA are Canadians/Mexicans/Cubans etc.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tholm
tholm
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Sure, but we do say "US" as an adjective quite a bit in international contexts: "I'm a US citizen." "The US consolate." I lived in Russia, and though we would likely say, "I'm going to hang out with some American friends," the sentence "I'm going to hang out with some US friends," would be totally appropriate.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IndaImmega
IndaImmega
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I translated this sentence as "I was with a US family" but Duo did not like it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/demsw

I think this should be good. Did you report it?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IndaImmega
IndaImmega
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Duo takes it now.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vandermonde

For what it's worth, i suspect this is less a result of our egocentrism and more a result of our laziness. The United States of America is way too long a name for a country. No one calls themselves The people's republic of chinese, but aside from the acronym, the only thing we can shorten ourselves to is also the name of two whole continents.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/caiser
caiser
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Yes for them

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duolinguo

right?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hrangue
Hrangue
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why isn't it estuvo?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Hrangue, The preterit tense is tricky. Estuvo is third person (he, she ,it) when you expect the first person ending to be O it is really E. Have to memorize a new set of verb endings.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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Preterit first person is usually E ending. And usually stressed on the last vowel, unless there was a root change.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sciboinkhobbes

It's definitely tricky. Something that helps me remember the preterite is a saying: "'e' for me, 'o' for others". For example, "estuvE" has an "e for me", while "estuvO" has an "o for others" (he, she, it). Maybe this will help others, too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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brilliante

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AllenJesse

Do you own Taca airlines

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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No, they own Talca Airlines.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/caiser
caiser
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  • Yo estuve
  • Tú estuviste
  • Él estuvo...
5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AllenJesse

correct

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DannyDannyDanny

I always learned this as "Estados Unidos" why is it crammed together to make one word?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/caiser
caiser
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Estados Unidos is the name of the country and estadounidense is the name that we use to call their citizens

  • Estados Unidos: estadounidense
  • Francia: francés
  • Inglaterra: inglés ...
5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Danny, Because it is being made into an adjective.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AllenJesse

Thats just how it is

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnTACO32

Why ESTAR and not SER? Still confused when to use which verb. Is it ESTAR because its "sort of" a Location situation? Ex. "I was with the american family(in some location somewhere)." Need a hint. Gracias

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bill-Roca

http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/serest1.htm

"essential quality" implies ser, a "condition" implies estar ... in this sentence you can interpret it as he was temporarily with an American family but it's not an essential unchangeable part of who he is.

Look at the green apple example given at the link above:

<pre>La manzana está verde. (condition: verde = unripe) La manzana es verde. (essential characteristic: verde = color green) </pre>
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/barrynelson

Could this be translated as ' I went with an American family'?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pobrecito13

No. That would be 'Fui con una familia estadounidense.' The verb being the preterite tense of IR, which is the same as the preterite tense of the verb SER.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soreIIina
soreIIina
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I lived why is incorrect?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gabrielwangbati

I think ''I was with one american family'' should be accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Madeline114012

Why is it "I" was with... Wouldn't that be estuvo?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xanuyan

Ah. Politics. Reminds me of how in USian English, "latino" doesn't mean the "latino" of other languages. In American English it is short for "latinoamericano," so people from other romance countries are offended USians don't consider them Latino.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JacquesGos3

"I was with an American family" is just as correct as "I stayed with an American family". After all, according to the Duolingo App itself, correct translations to "Estuve" are "I was, was and I stayed." Hence, it always comes down to storyline context. Both translations are correct but yield a different meaning. Hey guys I was with an American family this afternoon. How cool was that!? Or I stayed with an American family over the holidays and they were cool too. ¿Comprende Duolingo? Being penalized for nuances is starting to become annoying.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/linburnlane

Purely because I keep messing up "estadounidense", can one say "norteamericano"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/machtibor

I found it interesting and surprising to find out that US used to be called in Czech as what would be literally translated as "United States of Northern America". This would clear out some of these problems...except that there's also Canada and Mexico who too are North-Americans (or maybe Mexico is Central American, but Canada is the true North strong and free :)) ).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kainui

"I was with an American father" is one of many duolingo sentences enhanced in the fortune cookie spirit by saying "in bed" afterwards.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jczaia1230

I wrote US family these jerks didn't accept it

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stoneystone

They do now.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bill-Roca

I had "I was with a family from the United States" since I always thought americano was 'American' (and 'American' includes more than just the USA) and they accepted that.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jidohanbaiki
Jidohanbaiki
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I wrote "US-American family" and it wasn't accepted either.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kowal5ki

Yanks don't even know their own geography :)

5 years ago