"Please open the door."

Translation:Bonvolu malfermi la pordon.

3 years ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Albrechtion
Albrechtion
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Why isn't it "malfermu"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis_Domingos
Luis_Domingos
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You can't use two imperatives in a row - since "bonvulu" is already in the imperative, the next verb goes to the infinitive.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Albrechtion
Albrechtion
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Ok, thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yekrats

You might be able to say, "Malfermu la pordon, mi petas." (Puts the "please" into the "mi petas" form.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amuzulo
amuzulo
Mod
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I can confirm that we also accept this answer. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sesflankoj

We haven't really covered imperatives ending in '-u' in the skills tree yet, and I did not see any tips and notes at the beginning of this verbs section. That would be extremely helpful. Would it be useful to have a separate skill group for it?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis_Domingos
Luis_Domingos
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There is a skill about Imperatives later on :) Right now, all you need to know is the basic rule, which I've explained below: you can't have two imperatives in a row.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/e.m.w.
e.m.w.
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Malgrandaj porkoj, malgrandaj porkaj...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jl45a
jl45a
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why not "Bonvolu malfermas la pordon" ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mathso2
Mathso2
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After a modal verb, (e.g. can, may, want) the infinitive is always used. This also works in English, for example "I can be strong" makes sense but "I can am strong" doesn't.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cm_2871
cm_2871
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what exactly does imperative mean in terms of grammar? also, when is it appropriate to use bonvolu versas mi petas?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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  • 1760

The imperative is the verb mood you use when, for example, giving someone instructions. In English, it takes the form of the bare infinitive: "Be good."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperative_mood

Also, after the imperative in Esperanto, you must use the infinitive. So your sentence should be "Bonvolu verŝi*".

Saying both "bonvolu" and "mi petas" is a little redundant since they both mean essentially the same thing, but that's style, not grammar.

And since "verŝi" is generally a transitive verb, you'll probably need to include a direct object, which takes the accusative declension, which is the suffix -n. "Bonvolu, verŝi gxin, mi petas."

*(or versxi if you can't make the letters with the diacritical marks)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cm_2871
cm_2871
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Okay thank you and I also just realized i made a typo, i meant *versus not versas but thank you, I understand now

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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  • 1760

I'm not sure "versus" is a word in Esperanto.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cm_2871
cm_2871
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no i mean the word "versus" in english sorry for the confusion

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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  • 1760

Oh. And now I understand your original question. Hopefully I covered it in my first reply to you?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dusics95
dusics95Plus
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Please Esperanto community, introduce the words apri=open and malapri=close as synonyms... What's the etymology of fermi?! PS porto would be more logical than pordo imo

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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  • 1760

In French, "to close" is "fermer".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dusics95
dusics95Plus
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But it just means Portugal right?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danielqsc
danielqsc
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In fact, Portugal is Portugalio or Portugalujo. Porto is a city in it.

I just found out: it can also mean portado (ago de tiu, kiu portas) (http://vortaro.net/#portado). Porti usually means to carry, to wear (https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/porti#Esperanto).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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  • 1760

The country name Portugal comes from the Latin pordus, which means "harbor/port". "Port" as in "harbor" and the Spanish/Italian/French/etc. word that means "door" go back to the same Proto-Indo-European root. So it's not a coincidence.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=Portugal
http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=port

1 year ago
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