1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Esperanto
  4. >
  5. "Please open the door."

"Please open the door."

Translation:Bonvolu malfermi la pordon.

May 31, 2015

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Albrechtion

Why isn't it "malfermu"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis_Domingos

You can't use two imperatives in a row - since "bonvulu" is already in the imperative, the next verb goes to the infinitive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yekrats

You might be able to say, "Malfermu la pordon, mi petas." (Puts the "please" into the "mi petas" form.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amuzulo

I can confirm that we also accept this answer. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sesflankoj

We haven't really covered imperatives ending in '-u' in the skills tree yet, and I did not see any tips and notes at the beginning of this verbs section. That would be extremely helpful. Would it be useful to have a separate skill group for it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis_Domingos

There is a skill about Imperatives later on :) Right now, all you need to know is the basic rule, which I've explained below: you can't have two imperatives in a row.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/e.m.w.

Malgrandaj porkoj, malgrandaj porkaj...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jl45a

why not "Bonvolu malfermas la pordon" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mathso2

After a modal verb, (e.g. can, may, want) the infinitive is always used. This also works in English, for example "I can be strong" makes sense but "I can am strong" doesn't.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cm_2871

what exactly does imperative mean in terms of grammar? also, when is it appropriate to use bonvolu versas mi petas?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2672

The imperative is the verb mood you use when, for example, giving someone instructions. In English, it takes the form of the bare infinitive: "Be good."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperative_mood

Also, after the imperative in Esperanto, you must use the infinitive. So your sentence should be "Bonvolu verŝi*".

Saying both "bonvolu" and "mi petas" is a little redundant since they both mean essentially the same thing, but that's style, not grammar.

And since "verŝi" is generally a transitive verb, you'll probably need to include a direct object, which takes the accusative declension, which is the suffix -n. "Bonvolu, verŝi gxin, mi petas."

*(or versxi if you can't make the letters with the diacritical marks)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cm_2871

Okay thank you and I also just realized i made a typo, i meant *versus not versas but thank you, I understand now


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2672

I'm not sure "versus" is a word in Esperanto.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cm_2871

no i mean the word "versus" in english sorry for the confusion


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2672

Oh. And now I understand your original question. Hopefully I covered it in my first reply to you?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/djule95

Please Esperanto community, introduce the words apri=open and malapri=close as synonyms... What's the etymology of fermi?! PS porto would be more logical than pordo imo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2672

In French, "to close" is "fermer".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/djule95

But it just means Portugal right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danielqsc

In fact, Portugal is Portugalio or Portugalujo. Porto is a city in it.

I just found out: it can also mean portado (ago de tiu, kiu portas) (http://vortaro.net/#portado). Porti usually means to carry, to wear (https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/porti#Esperanto).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2672

The country name Portugal comes from the Latin pordus, which means "harbor/port". "Port" as in "harbor" and the Spanish/Italian/French/etc. word that means "door" go back to the same Proto-Indo-European root. So it's not a coincidence.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=Portugal
http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=port

Learn Esperanto in just 5 minutes a day. For free.