"Mi venas por manĝi."

Translation:I come to eat.

3 years ago

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JakeH1
JakeH1
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Is por necessary here? If so, why?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jackmchugh12

the same as 'pour' is in french. Just think it as 'in order to'

'I come in order to eat'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phillipguy06

I second your question! Is por really necessary here?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JakeH1
JakeH1
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Hey, I left this comment a while ago. I can now answer my own question with a definitive yes.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Subhog
Subhog
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Is that because of the enlightenment you get on level 15?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BGXCB

No, it's because of the informal nature of english, I think. In english we really should say "I come in order to eat", or "I come for the purpose of eating", but we shorten it to "I come to eat". There are a lot of occasions where the esperanto translation sounds like a more formal version of modern english.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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Wait... you mean ... THE Jake H?

(Or am I looking for JakeH0?)

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/creambun

What is the difference between "por" and "al?" Both have the meaning "to." Thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scintilla72
Scintilla72
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As far as I can tell, "por" = "for"/"in order to" and not any other meaning of "to".

One could also translate this sentence as "I'm coming for to eat", making the "for" explicit, and it would be perfectly valid English -- same as e.g. "coming for to carry me home" -- but in practice nobody else seems to use that construction in English anymore.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wattsin
Wattsin
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This makes the most sense as: eat = mangas, eating would =mangxi, -ing =to

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PurpleHuedMagPie

Maybe one is a "to a thing" and the other "to a person"? I'm just guessing cause I'm wondering the same thing.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paulally

Still sounds like ni to me

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkH188

I'm not getting any audio from this one.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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Works OK for me.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/omniduo
omniduo
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I come for eating.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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Or "I come for to eat" -- but yes. It's not quite everyday English, but it shows the structure and meaning.

10 months ago
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