"The piece of fruit tastes good."

Translation:La frukto bongustas.

3 years ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/faust.twi
faust.twi
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there is no words "piece" in translations

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hellomidnight

In English, 'fruit' can be both the plural and the singular. To specify a single fruit, we say "a piece of fruit". In Esperanto it is much more economical: "frukto" is the singular and "fruktoj" is the plural.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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I keep reading "Piece of…" as a slice or a section.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hellomidnight

Yes, "a piece of fruit" can also mean a slice or section of a fruit. This is one of those cases where English is really imprecise. But usually when talking about a slice or section of a fruit, you either say "fruit pieces" (you might see that written on a cereal box) or specify what fruit it is, e.g. "A piece of watermelon" or "Pieces of apple" rather than "A piece of fruit". "A piece of fruit" almost always refers to one whole fruit.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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I still want "piece of fruit" to be Fruktero.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hellomidnight

I think if you used 'fruktero' an Esperantist would understand it to mean 'slice/segment of fruit'. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nathankoren

That's not at all correct. I've never heard of a (whole) single fruit being referred to as "a piece of fruit". While "fruit" can be both plural and singular, that's the difference between "give me a fruit" [a single whole fruit] and "give me some fruit" [multiple whole fruits]. You would not say "a piece of fruit" to refer to (say) an entire melon or orange. Conversely, a slice of melon or a wedge from an orange is very definitely "a piece of fruit", and not "a fruit".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tonyclif

In Australia it is very common to refer to a complete banana or orange etc as "a piece of fruit", just as much as for a portion of the same fruit - so not very precise.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CliffJonesJr
CliffJonesJr
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As an American, "a fruit" sounds incorrect to me. It's really similar to saying something like "a rice". It implies "type of fruit" more than "piece of fruit". And yes, a piece can be the whole thing. Watermelon is a funny example though; a piece is more like a serving of fruit, which includes a whole apple or a whole orange but probably just a wedge of watermelon.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DominicSal294966

Agreed. (West coast US area) I would ask for "a fruit" if I wanted one unique whole fruit. If I referred to a piece of fruit, it would be a slice of a whole piece of fruit (and not a whole piece of fruit itself)

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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Not sure why your experience is different, but I've always understood a single apple or banana to be "a piece of fruit." Americans and Australians have chimed in saying the same thing - and according to these two threads, it's a normal expression in British English as well.

http://forum.thefreedictionary.com/postst15317_one-fruit-or-a-piece-of-fruit-.aspx

http://forum.wordreference.com/threads/a-piece-of-fruit-a-fruit.1227566/

If you say "an apple is a fruit" - your saying that it's not a vegetable. "One apple is a piece of fruit."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/faust.twi
faust.twi
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O_o_O didn't know.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NguyenThu547576

I translated "piece of fruit" fruktero. And the translation was not accepted. I know that the suffix "er/" is not yet taught. So you are right not to accept it. But I really do not agree with you putting "piece" in the sentence to be translated. It complicates the learning of the beginner.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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If you hover over "frukto" it tells you that it means "piece of fruit." I agree that this is one more thing to learn, but I disagree that teaching Esperanto as it is actually used counts as "complicating" the learning.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kavalasz
Kavalasz
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La frukto estas bongusta. I think this is right, too. Or isn't???

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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Yes. It's arguably a better way to say it.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Catheke
CathekePlus
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@Erika : When you say "La frukto estas bongusta", it's the litteral translation of "The (piece of) fruit is tasty". Here it is asked to translate the verb "to taste good", and not the adjective... Therefore it is better to translate it by "La frukto bongustas". Even if actually the idea is indeed the same. :)

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sumxs1
Sumxs1
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A bowl of different fruits. I say, "please pick out a piece of fruit."

10 months ago
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