"He is reading a German-language book."

Translation:Hij leest een Duitstalig boek.

May 31, 2015

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/nikbels12
  • 18
  • 18
  • 16
  • 6
  • 2

waarom geen "duitstalige"????

November 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Axelels
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 13
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9

because 'boek' is a 'het' word. You say 'het Duitstalige boek', but een Duitstalig boek

December 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/nikbels12
  • 18
  • 18
  • 16
  • 6
  • 2

Dankjewel!

December 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/gusbemacbe
  • 25
  • 25
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9
  • 2

Are Franstalig, Portugeestalig and Spaanstalig correct for a Dutch native?

And a Dutch-speaking, Portuguese-speaking person or a Dutch-speaker, a Portuguese-speaker or a Dutchophone, a Lusophone? How to say it in Dutch?

Does Dutch have Greek and Latin prefixes of demonyms, for example, Luso-French, Anglo-American, Italo-Brazilian, Franco-Canadian, Brazilo-German, Germano-Austrian, etc.? Check the lists of demonym prefixes in French and in English:

  1. Préfixes nationaux en français

  2. English nationality prefixes

December 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/-Jurjen-
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Franstalig, Portugeestalig en Spaanstalig are right.

You can refer to people who speak a language with adding an "e" after the adjectives. For example: zij is een franstalige, but this is quite uncommon. Most dutch people say just that someone speaks a language:

Dit is Anna, ze spreekt frans.

February 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/gusbemacbe
  • 25
  • 25
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9
  • 2

Dank u wel heel erg! :-D

February 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Axelels
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 13
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9

If you don't mind but in Dutch we don"t say dank u wel heel erg. We say Heel erg bedankt or simply dank u wel :)

December 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/-Jurjen-
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Greek and Latin prefixes are not used. You just put one demonym behind the other demonym with a "-" for example: Haar moeder is Duits, haar vader is Italiaans, ze is Duits-Italiaans.

There is only one exeption and that's the word "angelsaksisch". In English it would be "Anglosaxon" and it is used to express something Anglo-German.

February 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/gusbemacbe
  • 25
  • 25
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9
  • 2

Dank u wel nog eens!

February 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Axelels
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 13
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9

If you don't mind but in Dutch we say nog eens bedankt and not dank u wel nog eens :)

December 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/brfnll

So Duits has the specific connotation the book was written by a German, whereas Duitstalig just means the book is in the German language and could be an Austrian book, a Swiss book, a German translation of Harry Potter, etc?

May 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
Mod
  • 25
  • 20
  • 18
  • 17
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 7

'Duitstalig' indeed means that it's written in German. Doesn't have to be written by a German. :)

May 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
  • 22
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 306

Since "Duits" can refer to the country as well as the language, it can be ambiguous (depending on the context). Although in ambiguous contexts will usually refer to the country I think. "Duitstalig" takes the ambiguity away, as do sentences like: "Dit boek is in het Duits" (language) or "Dit boek komt uit Duitsland" (country).

May 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/-Jurjen-
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

If you say that a book "Duits" is without "-talig" it can also refer to an Austrian book, but that would be because you don't know the book is from Austria.

You also hear no one talking about American books. Dutch people talk about books in the english language as English books.

February 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Axelels
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 13
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9

is it me or is this a strange traduction? for me a German-language book seems like a book about the German language or to study German and not one writen in German? I thought you could say 'he reads a German book'?

December 8, 2016
Learn Dutch in just 5 minutes a day. For free.