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  5. "That boy is my grandson."

"That boy is my grandson."

Translation:Tiu knabo estas mia nepo.

May 31, 2015

22 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jepkatoj

As filo is son and praavo is grandfather I expected grandson to be prafilo. Why is it nepo, which seems to not build off existing words?

May 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis_Domingos

Praavo is great grandfather (from avo, grandfather).

Nepo doesn't build from other words because "avo" is already a base word (pranepo means great-grandson, though); unlike in English, this same divergence exists in other languages (in Portuguese, avô/avó vs. neto/neta).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jepkatoj

Oh yeah, I somehow didn't notice that grandfather wasn't {something} + patro. Got a little confused. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis_Domingos

No worries - again, it makes some sense to make that mistake in English. Once you have the base words memorized, creating words in Esperanto really is just a piece of cake.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

Too much so sometimes. I've failed a couple of tests because I made up my own words, without realizing it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fiddlerbird555

That would be the difference between learning the language and passing the test. Alas, Duolingo is not immune to that teaching trap.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andrewgtreantos

Consider it "Failing Forward" because you are learning from the mistakes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/everton.flavio

And.. What about fil.id.o?

"Filido" actually would mean offspring of a son, that maybe could be interpreted as a "nepo". That's the beauty of the language. If you forget a given word, you can create others with similar, or even the same, meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2072

Mi estas komencanto, sed mi pensas ke "-id" estu...

I am under the impression that "-id" is used on the species level, not the personal level. But I could be wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raztastic

If we did not have these roots (fil-, nep-), then "son" would be "patrido" or "patrinido" and "grandson" would be "patridido" or "patrinidido". I think it is useful to have roots dedicated to these basic family relationships to avoid ambiguity/loss of sanity.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spoutine

Why "tiu" and not "tio" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fiddlerbird555

Tio is (so far as I know) never used with people (vs things) , and it seems to be more general than "Tiu". Tiu is sometimes used with things, and seems to have a connotation of "that particular thing" rather than "that category of thing" (If someone corrects me, believe them; I'm not all that certain)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciaJH

That's about as Ⓘ understand it. The -u ending means "this/that individual, this/that one," so it refers to individual people; and people are assumed to be individuals whether or not you know their exact identity. You also use it when you're talking about a particular object or creature.

In contrast, the -o ending is for objects, so tio means "that/this " or "that/this thing," and you use it when you're speaking of a single, generic interchangeable item. Evildea has a great youtube video on them here: https://duckduckgo.com/?q=evildea+tiu+tio&t=fpas&iax=1&ia=videos&iai=0vc-wNwS98o


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spoutine

of course... Thanks !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/seanboyle30

Why not "estas mian nepon?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

The -n as direct object indicates that an action is happening to these nouns & adjectives. Mere being is not an action.

There will be more on this in the discussion on transitive & intransitive verbs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2072

"To be" is not a transitive verb. It's not even an active verb. It's a stative verb. As such, it does not take direct objects but rather subject complements.

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