"Se mennesket!"

Translation:Behold the man!

May 31, 2015

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeanne-Thomase

Love that Ecce homo is accepted :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StellarHowl

What is ecce homo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SylvainMou12

It's a famous sentence in the Bible, said by Ponce Pilate designing Jesus Christ to the hostile crowd. From that, it's also the name given to artistic depictions of the Christ crowned with thorns (at least in English, French and Norwegian).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cecilence

For a non native English speaker and a non Christian, it is very difficult to make sense out of this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CristianD.1

Same here, it feels like a tricky question. I do not really y see the value


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WaltonRoth

In Greek the word in “Behold the man” was clearly male: Ἰδοὺ ὁ ἄνθρωπος. In Vulgate Latin too: ecce homo. In several German translations I find “der Mensch”, which has a male gender but can refer to humans in general. The Norwegian menneske is always neuter. In an older Norwegian translation it was Se det menneske! (Det Norsk Bibelselskap 1930). But in a newer one, it was Se denne mann!» (En Levende Bok), which renders the Greek better.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/londoncallling

Anthropos (I can't do Greek letters on my phone) is masculine only in the grammatical sense. It means human person and can refer to a man or woman. The ancient Greek for man in the masculine sense was aner (long e). So menneske is actually the perfect translation. It's English that confuses the issue because man used to mean mankind in general, but now only means a male.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hrafnunga

Yep, the Latin also means "human being, person" in addition to man.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mprdo

And at least 10 lesson groups earlier, we learned "man" is used for "one" (as in "man kan betaler").10jul17


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kanakakisermis

Mann is not the same as man.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PrmExr2487

"Bibelen Guds Ord" (1997) translates it as 《Se Det Mennesket!》


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MannuBeyHive

To behold = å se?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmHoek

Plato vil vet hvor du er.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Riley_DM02

Featherless biped


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jaid.

Not today, Diogenes


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nieudany

Is "se" an imperative form of "ser" here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Indeed it is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/datsyl82

I think this is great. Keeps the learning process interesting beyond just practical travel phrases


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rose.boi

Why not just 'Se mannen'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaggiePye

Because in this context you want the connotation of "mankind/humankind," not just "adult male human."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bunchybunc

Famous 'quote' aside, would 'See the humans' be an accepted translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

"See the human!" would be, but not the plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvangelineM14

is 'se' supposed to sound like two syllables?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvangelineM14

Is 'se' supposed to sound like two syllables?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HengLok

is mennesket and menneske pronounced the same? I'm going to have difficulty hearing the difference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eriklw87

Se mennesket som er en bønne.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeggyNorsk

I love that song!

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