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  5. "He is a student but they are…

"He is a student but they are not students."

Translation:Is dalta é ach ní daltaí iad.

May 31, 2015

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Breandan2014

I would say that dalta is the Irish for pupil and that mac léinn is the Irish for student. I understand that the problem is with the English but I would think that both answers should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

I completely agree. I always learned mac léinn for 'student'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Troublesum1

I don't understand where the verb "to be" is in the second half of the answer. I thought that "ní" by itself pretty much translated as "not" and therefore needed to be paired with a separate verb, while "níl" was a contraction of "ní bhfuil" so it has the accompanying verb included. What am I missing here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KieranWalk

Ni on its own can also be the negative form of the copula (is) and thats the role it has here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IuileanMGabhann

Considering that there is a contrast between two persons here (maybe I’m biased by Italian, where this is significant), would it also be correct/usual to say ‘iadsan’?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MicheleTreCaffe

...? significant in what way, in Italian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TadhgMonabot

Why is daltai not lenited after ni?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1491

daltaí isn't a verb, and this isn't a negative particle, it's the negative form of the copula is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TadhgMonabot

Go raibh maith agat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/teresa599811

Can anyone explain to me when the rule for vowels following each other apply ? I thought 'is dalta hé' But it is 'é'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1491

There is no rule for vowels following each other (you've seen plenty of sentences that start with tá an). There are cases where the sounds of two vowels would blend into each other without some sort of buffer to keep them apart, and there are times when that blending isn't a problem, so you don't need a buffer.

In the case of pronouns like é, í and iad, you use a h- prefix after , cé and cá*.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MicheleTreCaffe

...and 'siad' vs 'iad'? Could they have used 'siad' here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1491

No. , and siad are only ever used as the subject of an active verb, and adjacent to that verb. They are not used with the copula.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kevinkelly233021

scríobh mé seo don cheann seo...Is mac léinn é ach ní mic léinn iad agus deir siad go bhfuil sé mícheart...chuir mé tuairisc isteach air.....

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